National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK

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Roberts C.D.,UK Met Office | Palmer M.D.,UK Met Office | Desbruyeres D.G.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Hyder P.,UK Met Office | Smith D.,UK Met Office
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans | Year: 2016

We present an observation-based heat budget analysis for seasonal and interannual variations of ocean heat content (H) in the mixed layer (Hmld) and full-depth ocean (Htot). Surface heat flux and ocean heat content estimates are combined using a novel Kalman smoother-based method. Regional contributions from ocean heat transport convergences are inferred as a residual and the dominant drivers of Hmld and Htot are quantified for seasonal and interannual time scales. We find that non-Ekman ocean heat transport processes dominate Hmld variations in the equatorial oceans and regions of strong ocean currents and substantial eddy activity. In these locations, surface temperature anomalies generated by ocean dynamics result in turbulent flux anomalies that drive the overlying atmosphere. In addition, we find large regions of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans where heat transports combine with local air-sea fluxes to generate mixed layer temperature anomalies. In all locations, except regions of deep convection and water mass transformation, interannual variations in Htot are dominated by the internal rearrangement of heat by ocean dynamics rather than the loss or addition of heat at the surface. Our analysis suggests that, even in extratropical latitudes, initialization of ocean dynamical processes could be an important source of skill for interannual predictability of Hmld and Htot. Furthermore, we expect variations in Htot (and thus thermosteric sea level) to be more predictable than near surface temperature anomalies due to the increased importance of ocean heat transport processes for full-depth heat budgets. © 2016. The Authors.


Firing Y.L.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Mcdonagh E.L.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | King B.A.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Desbruyeres D.G.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans | Year: 2016

Observations made on 21 occupations between 1993 and 2016 of GO-SHIP line SR1b in eastern Drake Passage show an average temperature of 0.53°C deeper than 2000 dbar, with no significant trend, but substantial year-to-year variability (standard deviation 0.08°C). Using a neutral density framework to decompose the temperature variability into isopycnal displacement (heave) and isopycnal property change components shows that approximately 95% of the year-to-year variance in deep temperature is due to heave. Changes on isopycnals make a small contribution to year-to-year variability but contribute a significant trend of -1.4±0.6 m°C per year, largest for density (γn)>28.1, south of the Polar Front (PF). The heave component is depth-coherent and results from either vertical or horizontal motions of neutral density surfaces, which trend upward and northward around the PF, downward for the densest levels in the southern section, and downward and southward in the Subantarctic Front and Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF). A proxy for the locations of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) fronts is constructed from the repeat hydrographic data and has a strong relationship with deep ocean heat content, explaining 76% of deep temperature variance. The same frontal position proxy based on satellite altimeter-derived surface velocities explains 73% of deep temperature variance. The position of the PF plays the strongest role in this relationship between ACC fronts and deep temperature variability in Drake Passage, although much of the temperature variability in the southern half of the section can be explained by the position of the SACCF. © 2016. The Authors.


Durden J.M.,Ocean and Earth ScienceUniversity of Southampton | Ruhl H.A.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Pebody C.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | van Oevelen D.,Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
Limnology and Oceanography | Year: 2017

Inputs of detritus from the surface ocean are an important driver of community dynamics in the deep sea. The assessment of the flow of carbon through the benthic food web gives insight into how the community is sustained, and its resilience to fluctuations in food supply. We used a linear inverse model to compare the carbon flow through the food webs on an abyssal hill and the nearby plain at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain sustained observatory (4850 m water depth; northeast Atlantic), to examine the partitioning of detrital input in these substantially different megafaunal communities. We found minimal variation in carbon flows at the plain over two years, but differences in the detrital inputs and in the processing of that carbon input between the hill and plain habitats. Suspension feeding dominated metazoan carbon processing on the hill, removing nearly all labile detritus input to the system. By contrast, half of all labile detritus was deposited and available for deposit feeders on the abyssal plain. This suggests that the biomass on the hill is dependent on a more variable carbon supply than the plain. The presence of millions of abyssal hills globally suggests that the high benthic biomass and respiration, and reduced deposition of detritus may be pervasive, albeit with varying intensity. © 2017 Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography.


Benetti M.,University of Iceland | Reverdin G.,Paris-Sorbonne University | Lique C.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Yashayaev I.,Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Center | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans | Year: 2017

The Labrador Current is an important conduit of freshwater from the Arctic to the interior North Atlantic subpolar gyre. Here we investigate the spatial variability of the freshwater sources over the southern Labrador shelf and slope during May-June 2014. Using measurements of seawater properties such as temperature, salinity, nutrients, and oxygen isotopic composition, we estimate the respective contributions of saline water of Atlantic and Pacific origins, of brines released during sea ice formation, and of freshwater from sea ice melt and meteoric water origins. On the southern Labrador shelf, we find a large brine signal and Pacific water influence indicating a large contribution of water from the Canadian Arctic. The brine signal implies that more than 4 m of sea ice formed upstream, either in the Arctic or in Baffin Bay and the northern Labrador Sea. Over the midshelf and slope at 52°N, we find a stronger influence of slope water from the West Greenland Current with a smaller contribution of Pacific water and no brine signal. Thus, there is advection of water from the slope region to the midshelf between 55°N and 52°N. Very freshwater with high meteoric content is found close to the coast in June 2014. Observations from 1995 and 2008 suggest a higher fraction of brine and Pacific water on the shelf compared to that observed in 2014. © 2017. American Geophysical Union.


Schulz E.W.,Center for Australian Weather and Climate ResearchAustralian Bureau of MeteorologyMelbourne | Josey S.A.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans | Year: 2017

This study analyzed shipboard air-sea measurements acquired by the icebreaker Aurora Australis during its off-winter operation in December 2010 to May 2012. Mean conditions over 7 months (October-April) were compiled from a total of 22 ship tracks. The icebreaker traversed the water between Hobart, Tasmania, and the Antarctic continent, providing valuable in situ insight into two dynamically important, yet poorly sampled, regimes: the sub-Antarctic Southern Ocean and the Antarctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) in the Indian Ocean sector. The transition from the open water to the ice-covered surface creates sharp changes in albedo, surface roughness, and air temperature, leading to consequential effects on air-sea variables and fluxes. Major effort was made to estimate the air-sea fluxes in the MIZ using the bulk flux algorithms that are tuned specifically for the sea-ice effects, while computing the fluxes over the sub-Antarctic section using the COARE3.0 algorithm. The study evidenced strong sea-ice modulations on winds, with the southerly airflow showing deceleration (convergence) in the MIZ and acceleration (divergence) when moving away from the MIZ. Marked seasonal variations in heat exchanges between the atmosphere and the ice margin were noted. The monotonic increase in turbulent latent and sensible heat fluxes after summer turned the MIZ quickly into a heat loss regime, while at the same time the sub-Antarctic surface water continued to receive heat from the atmosphere. The drastic increase in turbulent heat loss in the MIZ contrasted sharply to the nonsignificant and seasonally invariant turbulent heat loss over the sub-Antarctic open water. © 2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.


Giering S.L.C.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Sanders R.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Martin A.P.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Moller K.O.,Institute for Hydrobiology and Fisheries ScienceUniversity of HamburgHamburg Germany | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans | Year: 2016

Sinking organic matter in the North Atlantic Ocean transfers 1-3 Gt carbon yr-1 from the surface ocean to the interior. The majority of this exported material is thought to be in form of large, rapidly sinking particles that aggregate during or after the spring phytoplankton bloom. However, recent work has suggested that intermittent water column stratification resulting in the termination of deep convection can isolate phytoplankton from the euphotic zone, leading to export of small particles. We present depth profiles of large (>0.1 mm equivalent spherical diameter, ESD) and small (<0.1 mm ESD) sinking particle concentrations and fluxes prior to the spring bloom at two contrasting sites in the North Atlantic (61.30°N, 11.00°W and 62.50°N, 02.30°W) derived from the Marine Snow Catcher and the Video Plankton Recorder. The downward flux of organic carbon via small particles ranged from 23 to 186 mg C m-2 d-1, often constituting the bulk of the total particulate organic carbon flux. We propose that these rates were driven by two different mechanisms. In the Norwegian Basin, small sinking particles likely reached the upper mesopelagic by disaggregation of larger, faster sinking particles. In the Iceland Basin, a storm deepened the mixed layer to >300 m depth, leading to deep mixing of particles as deep as 600 m. Subsequent restratification could trap these particles at depth and lead to high particle fluxes at depth without the need for aggregation ("mixed-layer pump"). Overall, we suggest that prebloom fluxes to the mesopelagic are significant, and the role of small sinking particles requires careful consideration. © 2016. The Authors.


Porter M.,Scottish Association for Marine Science | Inall M.E.,University of EdinburghEdinburgh | Hopkins J.,National Oceanography CentreLiverpool UK | Palmer M.R.,National Oceanography CentreLiverpool UK | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans | Year: 2016

Using underwater gliders we have identified canyon driven upwelling across the Celtic Sea shelf-break, in the vicinity of Whittard Canyon. The presence of this upwelling appears to be tied to the direction and strength of the local slope current, which is in itself highly variable. During typical summer time equatorward flow, an unbalanced pressure gradient force and the resulting disruption of geostrophic flow can lead to upwelling along the main axis of two small shelf break canyons. As the slope current reverts to poleward flow, the upwelling stops and the remnants of the upwelled features are mixed into the local shelf water or advected away from the region. The upwelled features are identified by the presence of sub-pycnocline high salinity water on the shelf, and are upwelled from a depth of 300 m on the slope, thus providing a mechanism for the transport of nutrients across the shelf break onto the shelf. © 2016. The Authors.


Prieto E.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | Gonzalez-Pola C.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | Lavin A.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | Holliday N.P.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK
Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans | Year: 2015

The oceanic hydrography of the north-easternmost region of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre has been monitored since 2003 by three sections extending between 100 and 200 nautical miles from the Spanish NW and N coast into the Atlantic and the Bay of Biscay. The sections were occupied twice a year from 2003 to 2010, annually after that, and measure the whole water column (>5000 m). Correlation of series in the vertical and among sections, autocorrelation and estimates of the effect of the noise induced by the mesoscale field, all indicate that observed signatures are robust changes of water masses at the regional scale. The hydrographic time series are not characterized by smooth trends but instead by shifts that persist through consecutive cruises. The most notable features include a shift to more saline central waters around 2005 after which they remained stable, and a decrease in thermohaline properties of the Labrador Sea Water from autumn 2008 to 2010. Years with a strong winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index are characterized by shifts in thermohaline properties across most of the intermediate levels, with the most notable event being the warming and increasing salinity that followed the large NAO index drop of 2010. The observations are consistent with current understanding of the large-scale functioning of the North Atlantic, which predicts a northeastward expansion of subtropical temperate waters in the eastern boundary as a response to NAO forcing. The observed variability is discussed in relationship to large-scale circulation. © 2015. American Geophysical Union.


Lawrence J.,UK National Oceanography Center | Popova E.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Yool A.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Srokosz M.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans | Year: 2016

Rapidly retreating sea ice is expected to influence future phytoplankton production in the Arctic Ocean by perturbing nutrient and light fields, but poor understanding of present phytoplankton distributions and governing mechanisms make projected changes highly uncertain. Here we use a simulation that reproduces observed seasonal phytoplankton chlorophyll distributions and annual nitrate to hypothesize that surface nitrate limitation in the Arctic Ocean deepens vertical production distributions where light-dependent growth rates are lower. We extend this to interpret depth-integrated production changes projected by the simulation for an ice-free Arctic Ocean. Future spatial changes correspond to patterns of reduced surface nitrate and increased light. Surface nitrate inventory reductions in the Beaufort Gyre and Atlantic inflow waters drive colocated production distributions deeper to where light is lower, offsetting increases in light over the water column due to reduced ice cover and thickness. Modest production increases arise, 10% in a seasonally ice-free Arctic Ocean and increasing to 30% by the end of the century, occurring at depth. © 2015. American Geophysical Union.


Feng X.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Tsimplis M.N.,National Oceanography CentreSouthampton UK | Woodworth P.L.,National Oceanography CentreLiverpool UK
Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans | Year: 2015

The long-term changes in the main tidal constituents (O1, K1, M2, N2, and S2) along the coasts of China and in adjacent seas are investigated based on 17 tide-gauge records covering the period 1954-2012. The observed 18.61 year nodal modulations of the diurnal constituents O1 and K1 are in agreement with the equilibrium tidal theory, except in the South China Sea. The observed modulations of the M2 and N2 amplitudes are smaller than theoretically predicted at the northern stations and larger at the southern stations. The discrepancies between the theoretically predicted nodal variations and the observations are discussed. The 8.85 year perigean cycle is identifiable in the N2 parameters at most stations, except those in the South China Sea. The radiational component of S2 contributes on average 16% of the observed S2 except in the Gulf of Tonkin, on the south coast, where it accounts for up to 65%. We confirmed the existence of nodal modulation in S2, which is stronger on the north coast. The semidiurnal tidal parameters show significant secular trends in the Bohai and Yellow Seas, on the north coast, and in the Taiwan Strait. The largest increase is found for M2 for which the amplitude increases by 4-7 mm/yr in the Yellow Sea. The potential causes for the linear trends in tidal constants are discussed. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

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