Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Flaounas E.,National Observatory of Athens Greece | Kotroni V.,National Observatory of Athens Greece | Lagouvardos K.,National Observatory of Athens Greece | Kazadzis S.,National Observatory of Athens Greece | And 2 more authors.
Atmospheric Science Letters | Year: 2015

This study addresses the question of cyclone contribution to dust transport events over the Mediterranean. For this reason, we tracked and associated all intense cyclones in the period 2005-2012 with satellite estimations of the aerosol optical depth, the aerosol index and the aerosol Ångström exponent. Results show that cyclones are related with up to 20% of the total dust events over the Mediterranean, especially affecting its eastern side. When considering only the extreme dust events, the cyclone contribution may reach 70%, highlighting cyclones as one of the main factors for extreme dust transport events in the region. © 2015 Royal Meteorological Society. Source


Flaounas E.,National Observatory of Athens Greece | Lagouvardos K.,National Observatory of Athens Greece | Kotroni V.,National Observatory of Athens Greece | Claud C.,Ecole Polytechnique - Palaiseau | And 4 more authors.
Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society | Year: 2015

Two deep cyclones occurred in the Mediterranean between 25 and 31 October 2012, during the first Special Observation Period (SOP1) of the Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX). Both cyclones were associated with extreme rainfall covering a large part of the western Mediterranean Sea, where 24 h accumulated precipitation measurements exceeded 150 mm. We combine complementary observations from airborne radar and lidar systems, ZEUS lightning detection network and meteorological surface stations along with satellite diagnostics on deep convection, for a detailed microphysics and (thermo-)dynamical analysis of the two extreme rainfall cases. In addition, we use operational analysis data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) for analysing the synoptic conditions and diagnosing strongly ascending air masses in the vicinity of the cyclones, so-called warm conveyor belts (WCBs). The analysis revealed the different physical characteristics of the two cyclones responsible for the extreme rainfalls. Both cyclones were associated with a WCB and a comma cloud, but deep convection, intense lightning and very cold cloud tops occurred only for the first case while the second cyclone was mostly associated with stratiform rainfall, a strong WCB, and only a few embedded cells of deep convection. © 2015 Royal Meteorological Society. Source

Discover hidden collaborations