National Institute for Nutrition

Hanoi, Vietnam

National Institute for Nutrition

Hanoi, Vietnam

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Nakayama T.,Osaka University | Ueda S.,University of Ryukyus | Huong B.T.M.,National Institute for Nutrition | Tuyen L.D.,National Institute for Nutrition | And 5 more authors.
Infection and Drug Resistance | Year: 2015

Recent studies have reported a widespread distribution of extended-spectrum P-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria, not only in the nosocomial setting, but also in the community; some local communities in Southeast Asia have been reported to show a high prevalence of ESBL-producing bacteria. However, the details regarding the quantitative/qualitative state of ESBL-producing bacterial spread in Southeast Asia are currently unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the state of ESBL-producing bacterial spread in community residents from the Indochinese peninsula, as a representative region of Southeast Asia. In order to achieve this aim, local community residents in Laos and Vietnam were examined for fecal carriage of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and the findings were compared with data from a previous study in Thailand which was conducted in the same manner as this study. Between 47.0%-70.2% of the Laotian and Vietnamese residents carried ESBL-producing CTX-M genotype Enterobacteriaceae. The most common sub-genotypes of CTX-M were CTX-M-1 (33.0%—17.5%) and CTX-M-9 (47.5%-64.1%), and these rates were similar among all three countries. Taken together, these results confirmed that ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae are widely disseminated in Indochinese countries, such as Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam. © 2015 Nakayama et al.


PubMed | Osaka University, National Institute for Nutrition, Mahidol University and University of Ryukyus
Type: | Journal: Infection and drug resistance | Year: 2015

Recent studies have reported a widespread distribution of extended-spectrum -lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria, not only in the nosocomial setting, but also in the community; some local communities in Southeast Asia have been reported to show a high prevalence of ESBL-producing bacteria. However, the details regarding the quantitative/qualitative state of ESBL-producing bacterial spread in Southeast Asia are currently unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the state of ESBL-producing bacterial spread in community residents from the Indochinese peninsula, as a representative region of Southeast Asia. In order to achieve this aim, local community residents in Laos and Vietnam were examined for fecal carriage of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and the findings were compared with data from a previous study in Thailand which was conducted in the same manner as this study. Between 47.0%-70.2% of the Laotian and Vietnamese residents carried ESBL-producing CTX-M genotype Enterobacteriaceae. The most common sub-genotypes of CTX-M were CTX-M-1 (33.0%-47.5%) and CTX-M-9 (47.5%-64.1%), and these rates were similar among all three countries. Taken together, these results confirmed that ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae are widely disseminated in Indochinese countries, such as Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam.


Hoan N.V.,Montpellier SupAgro | Hoan N.V.,National Institute for Nutrition | Mouquet-Rivier C.,Montpellier SupAgro | Eymard-Duvernay S.,Montpellier SupAgro | Treche S.,Montpellier SupAgro
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2010

Extrusion cooking and amylase addition are two processing methods used for the preparation of high energy dense (ED) gruels of suitable consistency. A quantitative study of energy and nutrient intakes of 67 infants aged 6 to 10 months in rural areas in Vietnam was carried out to compare the effects of these processes used alone or in combination. Twice a day, for a period of four days each, infants successively ate four gruels prepared from different flours based on a blend of rice, sesame and soybean: an instant flour obtained by extrusion cooking (gruel A), a ready-to-cook flour obtained by extrusion cooking plus α-amylase addition (gruel B), a flour produced by milling crude rice, sesame and roasted soybean plus α-amylase addition (gruel C) and without amylase (control gruel D). Gruels A, B and C had a high ED of respectively 94, 122 and 124 kcal/100 g while the control gruel D had a low ED (59 kcal/100 g). The intakes of the four gruels were inversely linked to their ED. However, despite the fact that gruels B and C had similar ED, larger intakes were obtained with gruel B, which was attributed to better acceptability. The average energy intakes of high ED gruels A, B and C, respectively 112, 134 and 117 kcal/meal, were significantly higher than that of gruel D (81 kcal/meal). Of the three processing methods, the one combining extrusion cooking and amylase addition gave the best results in terms of gruel acceptability and energy intake.

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