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National Nuclear Security Administration

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News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

An international team of scientists, including one from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has found that up to 20 percent loss in the annual maximum amount of water contained in the Western United States' mountain snowpack in the last three decades is due to human influences. Peak runoff in streams and rivers of the Western U.S. is strongly influenced by melting of accumulated mountain snowpack. A significant decline in this resource has a direct connection to streamflow, with substantial economic and societal impacts. The team showed that observed snowpack loss between the 1980s and 2000s is consistent with results from climate simulations with combined changes in natural factors (such as solar irradiance and volcanic aerosols) and human influences (such as greenhouse gases, aerosols, ozone and land use) changes. The observed snowpack loss was inconsistent with simulations that considered natural influences only. Based on the current state of the snowpack, the researchers estimate a further loss of up to 60 percent within the next 30 years. "The projected losses have serious implications for the hydropower, municipal and agricultural sectors in the region," said John Fyfe, a senior research scientist at the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis of Environment and Climate Change Canada, and lead author of a paper appearing in the April 18 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. Using observations, land surface reanalysis products and climate model simulations, the team characterized the combined influences of decadal variability and external influences on recently observed and near-term projected changes in snowpack over the Western U.S. "These results add to the evidence of a human influence on climate that will have severe impacts on our water supply," said Benjamin Santer, an LLNL climate scientist and a co-author of the paper. Observations of snow water equivalent (SWE) were acquired from the United States Natural Resource Conservation Service Snow Telemetry (SnoTel) network of automated snow pillow measurements across alpine sites. The team focused on the post-1981 period, since the number of observations before this time was too low for calculations of reliable regional averages of SWE. The researchers used monthly (January-May) SnoTel observations that were continuously available from 1982 to 2016 at 354 stations with elevations greater than 1,500 meters. The data showed that 307 of the 354 stations (or about 87 percent of all stations) have a negative trend in annual maximum snow water. The maximum loss typically occurs in April. "These reductions in snowpack water storage have broad implications for future forest productivity and carbon storage, forest vulnerability to fire, as well as streamflow and water supply," Fyfe said. "Such sensitivities should be carefully considered in mitigating climate risks, particularly in the context of water resource and land management in the western United States." The LLNL portion of the work is supported by the DOE Office of Science. Founded in 1952, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provides solutions to our nation's most important national security challenges through innovative science, engineering and technology. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is managed by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Scientists and researchers at the federal government's largest national laboratory are pushing ahead with work related to national security and the proliferation of nuclear weapons as new managers take over New Mexico-based Sandia National Laboratories for the first time in decades, officials said Monday. Director Stephen Younger discussed the lab's future during a news conference that marked the start of a new contract with National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, a subsidiary of Honeywell International. The U.S. Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration announced the $2.6 billion management contract in December. Officials have spent the last few months working on a smooth transition for the lab's thousands of employees and operations. The bulk of work at Sandia centers on the research, development and maintenance of nuclear weapons, but scientists there also have worked on energy and climate projects. Younger, who has a background in nuclear weapons, called Sandia's employees the "superheroes of technology." "Sandia defends the world and provides the opportunity for millions, if not billions, of people to lead peaceful and productive lives," he said. Younger said his team has centuries of combined experience when it comes to national security issues and while the core mission of Sandia will not change, Honeywell, Northrup Grumman and other partners will be looking for ways to do more work and do it faster. The new lab leadership acknowledged current global conflicts, including nuclear threats by North Korea. "The government understands the importance of these institutions, and the institutions understand they have to be accountable for the money and the information they're providing. It's a different world today," Younger said. Lockheed Martin had operated Sandia, located in Albuquerque, for the past two decades and was among bidders that lost out to the Honeywell team. With an annual budget of close to $3 billion, Sandia is one of the Albuquerque area's largest employers with more than 10,500 workers. Most are based in Albuquerque, but Sandia also operates sites at Lawrence Livermore lab in California and testing facilities in Nevada and Hawaii. Its Albuquerque campus spans more than 21 square miles. A recent report by a coalition of local governments found that Sandia's partnership with private organizations through a science and technology park has generated more than $315 million in economic impact across the state over two years. Sandia will continue to work with local and small businesses, Deputy Director Dave Douglass said Monday.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

IMAGE:  An F-16C makes a pass over Nevada's Tonopah Test Range after a March test of a mock nuclear weapon as part of a Sandia National Laboratories life extension program for... view more ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- From a distance, the drop of a mock nuclear weapon -- containing only non-nuclear components -- was a mere puff of dust rising from a dry lake bed at Nevada's Tonopah Test Range. However, it marked the start of a new series of test flights vital to the nation's B61-12 weapon refurbishment program. Initial data showed the March 14 test was a success, said officials at Sandia National Laboratories, which runs Tonopah. For months, teams will be analyzing a wealth of data they collected from this first of a qualification test series planned over the next three years. Those watching from the tower of the range's Test Operations Center felt "excitement and pleasure that it all worked as we expected," said Anna Schauer, director of Sandia's Stockpile Resource Center. The B61-12 consolidates and replaces four B61 variants in the nation's nuclear arsenal. The first production unit in the weapon's life extension program is scheduled to be completed in 2020. Test day dawned cloudless and wind-free, perfect weather at the range, an area of 280 square miles with two main target areas on flat lake beds sitting between mountain ranges. Workers from Sandia and contractor Navarro Research and Engineering operated tracking telescopes, remote cameras and other instruments in the field to gather information on the reliability, accuracy and performance of the weapon under conditions meant to replicate operations. An F-16C from Nellis Air Force Base near Las Vegas, chosen to drop the test unit representing a B61-12, began with a dry run over one of the lake beds. But during his next pass for the planned release, he had to roar off after a small group of wild horses ambled onto the lake bed. A video feed from a remote camera in the area showed the horses trotting away to safety, herded by wranglers: security officers in a white pickup, its headlights and rack lights pulsing. "That's a first for us," said test director Joe Simile of Sandia. "We've never had to chase horses away from the target." The extra pass meant the F-16 carrying the test unit and a companion wingman F-16 would have to refuel in flight from a tanker airplane circling the area before returning to base. Then, horses cleared off, the pilots circled back. The test director queried those responsible for the various aspects of the test, from telemetry to the pilot of the drop plane. One by one they gave the test a go and a disembodied voice over the intercom announced, "Range is green. Cleared to release." The announcement, "Commence run," galvanized dozens of people watching and listening to live feeds of preparations at the tower. Most dashed out to the balconies to watch -- a natural reaction despite knowing the lake bed was miles away and they'd see nothing more than dust rising from the high-altitude drop. The video feed, a much closer look, showed the F-16 release the test unit, the unit's spin rocket motor ignite and the mock weapon fall through the air. "It's great to see things all come together: the weapon design, the test preparation, the aircraft, the range and the people who made it happen," Schauer said. After the drop, the two F-16s turned to scream past the control tower about a half mile away, giving observers a closer look at the planes. On the lake bed, the only sign of the drop was a surprisingly neat hole. An hour or so after the test, Simile stood near the hole, describing plans to recover the weapon, his discussion punctuated by a warning beep-beep-beep from a truck backing up to unload recovery equipment. Crews were back later to dig the mock weapon out of the dirt. "The test unit recovery went very well, with the unit packaged up for return to Albuquerque," said Lee Post, B61-12 flight test lead. "We can only hope our future tests go this well." Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. With main facilities in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, Calif., Sandia has major R&D responsibilities in national security, energy and environmental technologies and economic competitiveness.


News Article | March 17, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Graphene - Here's What You Should Know Even as criticism is mounting on slashing climate funding and allocations on science programs, the budget plan of President Trump would be generous with the energy department. This will be to manage the nuclear stockpile and revive the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste storage facility. In the new allocations, the National Nuclear Security Administration budget would get a rise of 11.3 percent while axing many of the programs run by Energy Department with an estimated cut of almost 18 percent. In the budget for Energy Department, nearly half the money goes into maintaining the nuclear stockpile and cleaning the waste left by programs of nuclear weapons research and production. In the budget, the president would provide $6.5 billion for thie program. The Obama administration had dropped the Yucca Mountain storage facility meant to hold commercial nuclear waste in the underground for 1 million years. The revival of Yucca project is supported by the Nuclear Energy Institute but is strongly opposed by ex-Senators like Harry M. Reid. While the energy budget spending would be pruned 5.6 percent from the current levels to $28 billion, with redistribution of funds based on priority. The slashed budget will have Office of Science losing $900 million from its average corpus of $5 billion from which research is supported by more than 300 universities and most of the national labs. Among the programs that may be dumped will include Energy Star labels and Weatherization Assistance. The latter doles out funding to states and low-income families of ancient tribes for improving energy efficiency. Also to be scrapped are the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy that spends $300 million on basic research. Other notables to be scrapped are Title 17 loan guarantees that assist energy projects with a low-carbon orientation and Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Program. The latter had supported companies like Tesla in the electric cars development and for launching combustion engines made of light materials as in the case of Ford. "The private sector is better positioned to finance disruptive energy research and development and to commercialize innovative technologies," the Office of Management and Budget said. Meanwhile, Trump's administration has sought the views of U.S. energy companies on the U.N. global climate accord, according to sources. The move is being interpreted as a sign that Trump is planning to retreat from his 2016 campaign stand of backing out of the Paris Climate deal. Many of the companies replied that they want the United States to remain in the deal and offered support for U.S. commitments. The accord has the backing of nearly 200 countries to limit global warming by slashing carbon dioxide and other emissions from fossil fuels. The United States will be required to reduce emissions between 26 and 28 percent to come down to below 2005 levels by 2025. The companies contacted were "publicly traded fossil fuel companies," and it was known that the White House wanted their inputs before taking a decision on the Paris accord. The sources said the White House has been leading the discussions with the companies, not the State Department. However, a White House official declined to comment. Calling climate change a hoax, Trump had said if he wins, the White House will "cancel the Paris Climate Agreement" within 100 days, as the deal is too costly for the U.S. economy. After assuming office, Trump has been mostly quiet on the issue and said in an interview that he would keep an open mind on the Paris deal. He also met with climate change advocate and former Vice President Al Gore in December. Among the energy companies, Exxon Mobil and ConocoPhillips have expressed support for the pact. The World Coal Association which has Peabody and other miners, also said it backs the deal. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Sandia National Laboratories Director Stephen Younger discusses the future of the federal government's largest weapons and research facility now that it's under new management during a news conference in Albuquerque, N.M., Monday, May 1, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Scientists and researchers at the federal government's largest national laboratory are pushing ahead with work related to national security and the proliferation of nuclear weapons as new managers take over New Mexico-based Sandia National Laboratories for the first time in decades, officials said Monday. Director Stephen Younger discussed the lab's future during a news conference that marked the start of a new contract with National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, a subsidiary of Honeywell International. The U.S. Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration announced the $2.6 billion management contract in December. Officials have spent the last few months working on a smooth transition for the lab's thousands of employees and operations. The bulk of work at Sandia centers on the research, development and maintenance of nuclear weapons, but scientists there also have worked on energy and climate projects. Younger, who has a background in nuclear weapons, called Sandia's employees the "superheroes of technology." "Sandia defends the world and provides the opportunity for millions, if not billions, of people to lead peaceful and productive lives," he said. Younger said his team has centuries of combined experience when it comes to national security issues and while the core mission of Sandia will not change, Honeywell, Northrup Grumman and other partners will be looking for ways to do more work and do it faster. The new lab leadership acknowledged current global conflicts, including nuclear threats by North Korea. "The government understands the importance of these institutions, and the institutions understand they have to be accountable for the money and the information they're providing. It's a different world today," Younger said. Lockheed Martin had operated Sandia, located in Albuquerque, for the past two decades and was among bidders that lost out to the Honeywell team. With an annual budget of close to $3 billion, Sandia is one of the Albuquerque area's largest employers with more than 10,500 workers. Most are based in Albuquerque, but Sandia also operates sites at Lawrence Livermore lab in California and testing facilities in Nevada and Hawaii. Its Albuquerque campus spans more than 21 square miles. A recent report by a coalition of local governments found that Sandia's partnership with private organizations through a science and technology park has generated more than $315 million in economic impact across the state over two years. Sandia will continue to work with local and small businesses, Deputy Director Dave Douglass said Monday.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

US nuclear weapons lab to keep focus on national security (AP) — Scientists and researchers at the federal government's largest national laboratory are pushing ahead with work related to national security and the proliferation of nuclear weapons as new managers take over New Mexico-based Sandia National Laboratories for the first time in decades, officials said Monday. Director Stephen Younger discussed the lab's future during a news conference that marked the start of a new contract with National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, a subsidiary of Honeywell International. The U.S. Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration announced the $2.6 billion management contract in December. Officials have spent the last few months working on a smooth transition for the lab's thousands of employees and operations. The bulk of work at Sandia centers on the research, development and maintenance of nuclear weapons, but scientists there also have worked on energy and climate projects. Younger, who has a background in nuclear weapons, called Sandia's employees the "superheroes of technology." "Sandia defends the world and provides the opportunity for millions, if not billions, of people to lead peaceful and productive lives," he said. Younger said his team has centuries of combined experience when it comes to national security issues and while the core mission of Sandia will not change, Honeywell, Northrup Grumman and other partners will be looking for ways to do more work and do it faster. The new lab leadership acknowledged current global conflicts, including nuclear threats by North Korea. "The government understands the importance of these institutions, and the institutions understand they have to be accountable for the money and the information they're providing. It's a different world today," Younger said. Lockheed Martin had operated Sandia, located in Albuquerque, for the past two decades and was among bidders that lost out to the Honeywell team. With an annual budget of close to $3 billion, Sandia is one of the Albuquerque area's largest employers with more than 10,500 workers. Most are based in Albuquerque, but Sandia also operates sites at Lawrence Livermore lab in California and testing facilities in Nevada and Hawaii. Its Albuquerque campus spans more than 21 square miles. A recent report by a coalition of local governments found that Sandia's partnership with private organizations through a science and technology park has generated more than $315 million in economic impact across the state over two years. Sandia will continue to work with local and small businesses, Deputy Director Dave Douglass said Monday.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

The Chemical Safety Board has investigated about 130 chemical-related industrial accidents over two decades. Like many science-related federal funding items, it would be abolished under the new $4.1 trillion budget proposed by President Donald Trump this week. The American Chemical Society has referred to it as “a death sentence.” The American Association for the Advancement of Science has estimated the proposed annual budget would cut overall federal research spending by 16.8 percent. Another major funding loser would be the Environmental Protection Agency, which would be hacked by about a third, including axing 3,800 jobs, and reducing the Superfund program – a stated priority of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt – by $330 million, to $762 million. Pruitt announced an initiative this week to “streamline” the Superfund program, which is already funded at half the level it was in the 1990s. The Department of Energy would be cut back 5.7 percent. While including more spending for the National Nuclear Security Administration and its role maintaining the nation’s nuclear weaponry, the budget would cut $700 million from an office promoting energy efficiency and completely eliminates others, including the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. Other high-profile scientific agencies would see dramatic cuts. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would be cut by 18 percent, to approximately $6.3 billion. The National Institutes of Health would also be reduced by the same 18 percent, to approximately $26 billion total for 2018. The climate-change programs of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other agencies within the Department of Commerce would be strongly squeezed by a total reduction of 15.4 percent of the Department. No department is being cut back more than the Department of Education, which is proposed to get hacked nearly in half, by approximately 46.9 percent. That includes axing after-school programs, teacher training, and also subsidized federal student loans, among other public services. NASA would sustain about a 3 percent cut, leaving it at almost the same $19 billion funding level – but a series of climate-change research projects and education outreach programs would be axed. The beneficiaries of the many cuts would be the Department of Defense, which would see tens of thousands more personnel, widespread pay raises for troops, and additional $64.6 for military operations in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Another agency which would be boosted is the Department of Veterans Affairs, which would go up 3.7 percent, mostly for discretionary medical spending at the 1,200 VA facilities across the country. Almost all of the proposed cuts would have to be approved by Congress, which could mean the final numbers would be significantly different. The Associated Press contributed to this report.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

Overall, federal R&D would take a 16.8% hit, down $12.6 billion, according to estimates from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The “budget fails to recognize that federal R&D investment is the most critical step driving U.S. innovation,” says Glenn Ruskin, spokesperson for the American Chemical Society, which publishes C&EN. “Slashing federal research budgets will result in less innovation, less job creation, and less economic growth—all of which undermines our global competitiveness.” Congress has widely ignored presidential budget requests in the past, and that might be the case for Trump’s 2018 budget as well. Many Republicans and Democrats rejected the proposal. Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and John Cornyn (R-Texas) declared it “dead on arrival.” Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas, the top Democrat on the House Science, Space & Technology Committee, says, “I hope and expect that by the time the appropriations process is over, we will have achieved a saner outcome.” Although the budget isn’t binding, it does show Trump’s science and technology priorities. NASA, a longtime Trump favorite, would be down just 2.8% to $19.1 billion. And both the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration, which oversees the agency’s nuclear weapons programs, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency would get increases. However, most agencies are facing double-digit declines in funding under the proposal. This largely mirrors cuts laid out in a preliminary budget Trump released in March, despite protests from science advocacy organizations and some members of Congress. The National Institutes of Health is slated to lose about $7.4 billion, or 21.5%, down to $26.9 billion in 2018. The agency hasn’t seen funding levels this low since the early 2000s. The Trump Administration is planning to eliminate NIH’s Fogarty International Center, which focuses on global health and builds scientific expertise in developing countries to address pandemics. Many in the biomedical community are appalled by the President’s request. “These proposed cuts are unconscionable and unjustified,” says Hudson H. Freeze, president of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. “Are we ready to abdicate our role as a world leader in research?” DOE’s Office of Science, which funds basic physical science research, is facing cuts of 17.0% to $4.5 billion. Energy programs would be even harder hit, with an estimated loss of 60.3%, including the elimination of the Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy, which was created by the Obama Administration. The National Science Foundation is slated for an 11.0% decrease overall to $6.6 billion under Trump’s proposal, bringing it back to 2002 funding levels. Under those funding levels, the success rate for grant applications is estimated to fall to 19% from 24% in 2016, the most recent year data were available. NSF’s Chemistry Division largely spread its cuts across programs while preserving its core individual investigator grants, which would take an 8% hit. Career grants for early career scientists would get a 10% cut, which might mean smaller grants for new scientists. The Centers for Chemical Innovation program, which supports topical research centers at universities, would be cut by 24%. The National Institute of Standards & Technology, which has had strong Congressional support in recent years, faces a proposed decrease of 23.2% below 2017 levels to $725 million. The lab’s core science programs would be cut by 15% to $547 million. The Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership, which supports small- and midsized manufacturers nationwide, would be killed under the 2018 budget proposal. The National Network for Manufacturing Innovation would get a $10 million reduction from 2017 levels to $15 million. Among the hardest hit would be the Environmental Protection Agency, which would receive $5.7 billion in fiscal 2018, a 30% decrease from the 2017 level. EPA science and technology efforts would receive $397 million, a 44% decrease from 2017 funding. However, the agency office that oversees commercial chemicals would get about 240 additional full-time employees to help implement the revised Toxic Substances Control Act. The office would receive $65 million, an increase of $6.6 million compared with 2017, for its chemical risk review program. Part of the increase would be paid for by industry fees.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

The Chemical Safety Board has investigated about 130 chemical-related industrial accidents over two decades. Like many science-related federal funding items, it would be abolished under the new $4.1 trillion budget proposed by President Donald Trump this week. The American Chemical Society has referred to it as “a death sentence.” The American Association for the Advancement of Science has estimated the proposed annual budget would cut overall federal research spending by 16.8 percent. Another major funding loser would be the Environmental Protection Agency, which would be hacked by about a third, including axing 3,800 jobs, and reducing the Superfund program – a stated priority of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt – by $330 million, to $762 million. Pruitt announced an initiative this week to “streamline” the Superfund program, which is already funded at half the level it was in the 1990s. The Department of Energy would be cut back 5.7 percent. While including more spending for the National Nuclear Security Administration and its role maintaining the nation’s nuclear weaponry, the budget would cut $700 million from an office promoting energy efficiency and completely eliminates others, including the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. Other high-profile scientific agencies would see dramatic cuts. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would be cut by 18 percent, to approximately $6.3 billion. The National Institutes of Health would also be reduced by the same 18 percent, to approximately $26 billion total for 2018. The climate-change programs of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other agencies within the Department of Commerce would be strongly squeezed by a total reduction of 15.4 percent of the Department. No department is being cut back more than the Department of Education, which is proposed to get hacked nearly in half, by approximately 46.9 percent. That includes axing after-school programs, teacher training, and also subsidized federal student loans, among other public services. NASA would sustain about a 3 percent cut, leaving it at almost the same $19 billion funding level – but a series of climate-change research projects and education outreach programs would be axed. The beneficiaries of the many cuts would be the Department of Defense, which would see tens of thousands more personnel, widespread pay raises for troops, and additional $64.6 for military operations in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Another agency which would be boosted is the Department of Veterans Affairs, which would go up 3.7 percent, mostly for discretionary medical spending at the 1,200 VA facilities across the country. Almost all of the proposed cuts would have to be approved by Congress, which could mean the final numbers would be significantly different. The Associated Press contributed to this report.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan powered by 2.0L EA888 Gen3B engine | Main | US sues Fiat Chrysler over diesel emissions » The Trump Administration released its proposed FY 2018 budget, which it calls “A New Foundation for American Greatness”. To help achieve the Administration’s overall budget goal in 10 years, the FY2018 budget includes $3.6 trillion in spending reductions over 10 years, the most ever proposed by any President in a budget. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is targeted for the largest percentage reduction in FY 2018, with a $2.6-billion cut (31.4%) in discretionary spending to a proposed $5.7 billion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) faces a $1.7-billion cut (5.6%) to $28 billion, the US Department of Transportation (DOT) faces a $2.4-billion cut (12.7%) to $16.2 billion, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) is looking at a cut of $800 million (10.7%) to $6.7 billion. (Health and Human Services faces the largest dollar cut: $12.7 billion, or 16.2%). EPA. All major program activities face about 34% in cuts. Enforcement spending takes a 69% haircut, dropping from an estimated $419 million in 2017 to a proposed $129 million for 2018. The Budget concentrates EPA’s enforcement of environmental protection violations on programs that are not delegated to States, while providing oversight to maintain consistency and assistance across State, local, and tribal programs. Superfund spending drops 57% from $762 million to $330 million. The new budget envisions an 18% reduction in payroll to $873 million, with a cut in civilian full-time equivalent employment of 26%: from 9,729 FTE to 7,228. Among the other highlights: The Budget includes $2.3 billion for the State Revolving Funds, a $4-million increase over the 2017 level. The Budget also provides $20 million for the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program, equal to the funding provided in the 2017 annualized CR. This credit subsidy could potentially support $1 billion in direct Federal loans. Targets EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) at a level of approximately $250 million, which would result in a cut of $233 million from the 2017 annualized CR level. Eliminates funding for specific regional efforts such as the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, the Chesapeake Bay, and other geographic programs. These geographic program eliminations are $427 million lower than the 2017 annualized CR levels. The Budget returns the responsibility for funding local environmental efforts and programs to State and local entities. Eliminates more than 50 EPA programs, cutting an additional $347 million compared to the 2017 annualized CR level. Lower priority and poorly performing programs and grants are not funded, nor are duplicative functions that can be absorbed into other programs or that are State and local responsibilities. Examples of eliminations include: Energy Star; Targeted Airshed Grants; the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; and infrastructure assistance to Alaska Native Villages and the Mexico Border. DOE. Although the overall budget for the US Department of Energy (DOE) is a requested $28.0 billion—a $1.7-billion or 5.6% decrease from the 2017 annualized CR level—the budget provides a $1.4-billion (11%) increase above the 2017 annualized CR level for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The 2018 budget envisions an increase in direct civilian employment to 1,715 FTE—up 5.5%. Highlights of the proposed budget for the DOE include: Sustainable transportation program activities within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy face a combined 49% cut in funding. DOT. The President’s 2018 Budget requests $16.2 billion for DOT’s discretionary budget—a $2.4-billion (12.7%) decrease from the 2017 annualized CR level. Highlights include: NSF. Although all existing NSF program activities face cuts under the proposed budget, the budget adds in a new program: the Office of Polar Programs, with $409 million in funding.

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