Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Arlington, VA, United States

The National Nanotechnology Initiative is a United States federal government program for the science, engineering, and technology research and development for nanoscale projects. “The NNI serves as the central point of communication, cooperation, and collaboration for all Federal agencies engaged in nanotechnology research, bringing together the expertise needed to advance this broad and complex field.” Initiative participants state that its four goals are to advance a world-class nanotechnology research and development program; foster the transfer of new technologies into products for commercial and public benefit; develop and sustain educational resources, a skilled workforce, and the supporting infrastructure and tools to advance nanotechnology; and support responsible development of nanotechnology.↑ ↑ Wikipedia.


Peng S.,Nanyang Technological University | Peng S.,National Nanotechnology Initiative | Zhu P.,National University of Singapore | Mhaisalkar S.G.,Nanyang Technological University | Ramakrishna S.,National University of Singapore
Journal of Physical Chemistry C | Year: 2012

This paper reports the fabrication of self-supporting three-dimensional ZnIn 2S 4/PVDF-poly(MMA-co-MAA) (ZIS/Polymer) composite mats with hierarchical nanostructures by a simple combination of an electrospinning technique and a hydrothermal process and their high photocatalytic activity. The characterization results show that ZnIn 2S 4 (ZIS) nanosheets with a thickness of about 20 nm distribute uniformly on the surface of the nanofiber polymers to form mats. The coverage density of the ZIS nanosheet coating on the surface of the polymer mats could be controlled by simply adjusting the amount ratios of feeding reactants to polymers. Furthermore, the growth process of ZIS coating is investigated based on time-dependent experiments. The obtained ZIS/Polymer heteroarchitectures show high photocatalytic property and stability to degrade methyl orange (MO) because of the formation of hierarchical nanostructures, which might improve the adsorption and catalysis of the dyes. Due to the self-supporting property of the mats, the ZIS/Polymer mats could be laid or hung conveniently anywhere under solar irradiation and recycled easily, which provides a solution to the separation problem for conventional catalysts that are small in size. The study may open a new way to build hierarchical device fabrics with optical and catalytic properties. © 2012 American Chemical Society. Source


News Article | April 26, 2016
Site: http://www.rdmag.com/rss-feeds/all/rss.xml/all

"This is a proof-of-principle study demonstrating that proteins can be used as effective vehicles for organizing nano-materials by design," says senior author Gevorg Grigoryan, an assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth. "If we learn to do this more generally - the programmable self-assembly of precisely organized molecular building blocks—this will lead to a range of new materials towards a host of applications, from medicine to energy." The study appears in the journal in Nature Communications. According to the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative, scientists and engineers are finding a wide variety of ways to deliberately make materials at the nanoscale - or the atomic and molecular level—to take advantage of their enhanced properties such as higher strength, lighter weight, increased control of light spectrum and greater chemical reactivity than their larger-scale counterparts. Proteins are "smart" molecules, encoded by our genes, which organize and orchestrate essentially all molecular processes in our cells. The goal of the new study was to create an artificial protein that would self-organize into a new material—an atomically periodic lattice of buckminster fullerene molecules. Buckminster fullerene (buckyball for short) is a sphere-like molecule composed of 60 carbon atoms shaped like a soccer ball. Buckyballs have an array of unusual properties, which have excited scientists for several decades because of their potential applications. Buckyballs are currently used in nanotechology due to their high heat resistance and electrical superconductivity, but the molecule is difficult to organize in desired ways, which hampers its use in the development of novel materials. In their new research, Grigoryan and his colleagues show that their artificial protein does interact with buckyball and indeed does organize it into a lattice. Further, they determined the 3-dimensional structure of this lattice, which represents the first ever atomistic view of a protein/buckyball complex. "Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties," Grigoryan says. "In this research, we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene into ordered superstructures. Further, excitingly, we have observed this protein/buckyball lattice conducts electricity, something that the protein-alone lattice does not do. Thus, we are beginning to see emergent material behaviors that can arise from combing the fascinating properties of buckyball and the abilities of proteins to organize matter at the atomic scale. Taken together, our findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design."


News Article | April 27, 2016
Site: http://www.cemag.us/rss-feeds/all/rss.xml/all

A Dartmouth College scientist and his collaborators have created an artificial protein that organizes new materials at the nanoscale. "This is a proof-of-principle study demonstrating that proteins can be used as effective vehicles for organizing nano-materials by design," says senior author Gevorg Grigoryan, an assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth. "If we learn to do this more generally - the programmable self-assembly of precisely organized molecular building blocks -- this will lead to a range of new materials towards a host of applications, from medicine to energy." The study appears in the journal in Nature Communications. According to the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative, scientists and engineers are finding a wide variety of ways to deliberately make materials at the nanoscale - or the atomic and molecular level -- to take advantage of their enhanced properties such as higher strength, lighter weight, increased control of light spectrum and greater chemical reactivity than their larger-scale counterparts. Proteins are "smart" molecules, encoded by our genes, which organize and orchestrate essentially all molecular processes in our cells. The goal of the new study was to create an artificial protein that would self-organize into a new material -- an atomically periodic lattice of buckminster fullerene molecules. Buckminster fullerene (buckyball for short) is a sphere-like molecule composed of 60 carbon atoms shaped like a soccer ball. Buckyballs have an array of unusual properties, which have excited scientists for several decades because of their potential applications. Buckyballs are currently used in nanotechology due to their high heat resistance and electrical superconductivity, but the molecule is difficult to organize in desired ways, which hampers its use in the development of novel materials. In their new research, Grigoryan and his colleagues show that their artificial protein does interact with buckyball and indeed does organize it into a lattice. Further, they determined the 3-dimensional structure of this lattice, which represents the first ever atomistic view of a protein/buckyball complex. "Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties," Grigoryan says. "In this research, we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene into ordered superstructures. Further, excitingly, we have observed this protein/buckyball lattice conducts electricity, something that the protein-alone lattice does not do. Thus, we are beginning to see emergent material behaviors that can arise from combing the fascinating properties of buckyball and the abilities of proteins to organize matter at the atomic scale. Taken together, our findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design."


News Article
Site: http://cen.acs.org/news/ln.html

A federal science competition for high school students led to the creation of Radio Blitz, a superhero who disposes of waste. Students were challenged by the National Science Foundation and the National Nanotechnology Initiative to create superheroes who use nanoscience in their powers. Radio Blitz is the creation of Madeleine Chang from Bergen County Academies in New Jersey. It won both second prize and the People’s Choice Award.


Home > Press > Identifying Commercial Success Stories from the National Nanotechnology Initiative: National Nanotechnology Coordination Office and White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Issue a Request for Information on NNI-Supported Success Stories Abstract: he National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) are asking for examples of commercialization success stories arising from Federal investments in nanotechnology research & development since the inception of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) in 2001. Under the NNI, the U.S. Government has invested more than $22 billion in fundamental and applied research in nanotechnology, the development of world-class user facilities for fabrication, characterization and modeling/simulation, and in the responsible development of nanotechnology. The formal Request for Information (RFI) can be found in today’s Federal Register; its purpose is to gather information to better understand how these investments and resources have been utilized in the successful transition of nanotechnology-based products from the lab to market. “I look forward to hearing more commercialization success stories from the U.S. nanotechnology community,” said Dr. Michael Meador, NNCO Director. “Fifteen years ago, the NNI planted the seeds of foundational research in nanoscience and nanoengineering, and now we are seeing the fruits of these investments. Businesses across the country have grown from the idea stage into market-ready products with the support of the NNI, and we want to hear their stories.” An OSTP blog post today details a number of recent nanotechnology success stories, including work that led to two National Medal of Science awards and one Medal of Technology and Innovation award this year. Submissions for the RFI are due February 29, 2016. About National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) About Dr. Meador and the NNCO: Dr. Michael Meador serves as Director of the NNCO, which is leading the efforts to promote the goals of the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) in fostering cutting-edge nanotechnology R&D; establishing world-class testing, characterization, and fabrication facilities; facilitating commercialization of nanotechnology-based products; and promoting the responsible development of nanotechnology. The NNCO serves as a central point of contact for U.S. nanotechnology R&D activities, and provides public outreach on behalf of the NNI, including hosting and curating Nano.gov, the U.S Government’s nanotechnology website. As NNCO Director, Dr. Meador is also a staff member at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. He is a strong advocate for the nanotechnology business community, seeking pathways to commercialization, and helping companies overcome the challenges to success that are specific to nanotechnology businesses. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Discover hidden collaborations