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Limviriyakul P.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Limviriyakul P.,Kasetsart University | Tseng L.-C.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Shih T.-W.,National Museum of Marine Science and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology | Year: 2016

Coral symbiotic crabs provide considerable benefits to their host corals. A comprehensive understanding of the association between these crabs and their hosts could help clarify the relationship, interaction, and importance of symbionts with coral reefs as hosts. In this study, the coral symbiotic crab Tetralia rubridactyla was test for host preference and fidelity. Five oceanic objects were provided to the crabs: common host corals (Acropora hyacinthus and A. digitifera), uncommon host corals (Pocillopora damicornis and Stylophora pistillata), and dead coral skeletons. The crabs were collected from the 2 source host corals A. hyacinthus and A. digitifera and subjected to an experiment comprising 7 treatments. Each treatment included 2 stages of no-choice and choice conditions to estimate the expected selection frequencies. The results revealed that the crabs chose any available object under the no-choice condition, and exhibited various preferences under the choice condition. Moreover, T. rubridactyla exhibited significantly higher frequencies to inhabit Acropora corals (p < 0.01, χ2 test), than dead coral skeletons and uncommon host corals. In all the treatments, the preferences of the crabs from the 2 source hosts were similar. Present results demonstrated T. rubridactyla host selection conditioning as follows: (1) Under the no-choice condition, inhabit any choice object for shelter; (2) under the choice condition, if without a common host, randomly inhabit any uncommon choice object as a host; and (3) under the choice condition, if a common host is available, selecting the common host is the first priority because it could provide food and space. This study revealed that T. rubridactyla express neither fidelity nor preference between A. hyacinthus and A. digitifera. Thus, these results also suggested that the distribution of T. rubridactyla on Acropora corals in the reef is affected by an abundance of corals rather than the preferences of coral species. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Liu A.K.,Ocean University of China | Su F.-C.,National Museum of Marine Science and Technology | Hsu M.-K.,Taipei Chengshih University of Science and Technology | Kuo N.-J.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Ho C.-R.,National Taiwan Ocean University
Continental Shelf Research | Year: 2013

The objective of this study is to investigate the generation and evolution of mode-two internal waves on the shelf break. In this study, some historical mooring and satellite data have been investigated for the detection of mode-two solitons in the ocean. A recent field experiment in May 2009 near Dong-Sha Island in the South China Sea (SCS) is first described and analyzed. During the experiment, a small mode-two wave was observed following a huge mode-one soliton on the shelf. Then, the environmental conditions for the evolution of mode-two internal waves were assessed for parametric and sensitivity study based on the CTD data from previous experiment in SCS. The generation of mode-two waves on the shelf by disintegration of mode-one solitons in the deep ocean is proposed and analyzed based on the theory of modal-decomposition. For comparison, the soliton characteristics of mode-one and -two waves from environmental parameters have been estimated. It's been shown that the soliton width of large mode-two waves is much wider than mode-one waves. [U+25BA] We investigated the generation and evolution of mode-two solitons on the shelf break.[U+25BA] Historical mooring and satellite data have been investigated for the detection of mode-two solitons in the ocean.[U+25BA] The mode-two waves on the shelf are generated from the disintegration of mode-one solitons in the deep ocean.[U+25BA] The soliton width of large mode-two waves is much wider than mode-one waves. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Chang N.N.,National Taiwan University | Liu E.Y.,National Taiwan University | Liao Y.C.,National Museum of Marine Science and Technology | Shiao J.C.,National Taiwan University
Journal of Fish Biology | Year: 2015

Otolith stable-oxygen-isotope composition and microstructure were analysed in order to investigate the vertical habitat shift of deep-sea cusk eels (Ophidiiformes). Otolith δ18O profiles suggested that both viviparous blind cusk eels and oviparous cusk eels experienced a pelagic larval stage and then settled to the deep-sea floor over a vertical distance that ranged among individuals from 200 to >1000 m. This result shows that the larvae of viviparous Barathronus maculatus undertake an ontogenetic vertical migration after a period of larval drift that may facilitate their wide distribution on the sea floor. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.


PubMed | National Museum of Marine Science and Technology, South African Institute For Aquatic Biodiversity and Academia Sinica, Taiwan
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Jaydia erythrophthalma n. sp. is described from specimens collected during two recent biodiversity surveys along the east and west coasts of Luzon, Philippines. It is characterized by a first dorsal fin with eight spines, serrated posterior and crenulated ventral preopercular edges, reddish orange iris and two series of brown spots tinged in orange on the upper part of the body.


PubMed | Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Academia Sinica, Taiwan and National Museum of Marine Science and Technology
Type: | Journal: Scientific data | Year: 2015

The long-term species diversity patterns in marine fish communities are garnering increasing attention from ecologists and conservation biologists. However, current databases on quantitative abundance information lack consistent long-term time series, which are particularly important in exploring the possible underlying mechanism of community changes and evaluating the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation measures. Here we describe an impinged fish assemblage dataset containing 1, 283, 707 individuals from 439 taxa. Once a month over 19 years (1987-1990 and 2000-2014), we systematically collected the fish killed by impingement upon cooling water intake screens at two nuclear power plants on the northern coast of Taiwan. Because impingement surveys have low sampling errors and can be carried out over many years, they serve as an ideal sampling tool for monitoring how fish diversity and community structure vary over an extended period of time.


Gon O.,South African Institute For Aquatic Biodiversity | Liao Y.-C.,National Museum of Marine Science and Technology | Kwang-Tsao S.,Academia Sinica, Taiwan
Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Jaydia erythrophthalma n. sp. is described from specimens collected during two recent biodiversity surveys along the east and west coasts of Luzon, Philippines. It is characterized by a first dorsal fin with eight spines, serrated posterior and crenulated ventral preopercular edges, reddish orange iris and two series of brown spots tinged in orange on the upper part of the body. © 2015 Magnolia Press.


Jiang G.-C.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Chan T.-Y.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Shih T.W.,National Museum of Marine Science and Technology
Zootaxa | Year: 2014

The eggs of three deep-sea pandalid shrimps Heterocarpus abulbus, H. hayashii and H. sibogae are successfully hatched in the laboratory. The first zoeal stage of these shrimps are described, with those of H. abulbus and H. hayashii being reported for the first time. First zoeae of different Heterocarpus species can be distinguished by the spination at the anteroventral carapace, body size, rostral length and appendage setation. Copyright © 2014 Magnolia Press.


Jiang G.-C.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Landeira J.M.,Hokkaido University | Shih T.-W.,National Museum of Marine Science and Technology | Chan T.-Y.,National Taiwan Ocean University
Journal of Crustacean Biology | Year: 2016

The morphology of the first nine zoeal stages of the upper-bathyal caridean shrimp Heterocarpus abulbus Yang, Chan and Chu, 2010 are described and illustrated in detail from laboratory-hatched material. In comparison with previous studies of Heterocarpus larvae, an important progress in larval rearing was achieved, with the larvae surviving in the laboratory for 25 days. Although some adult characters had started to develop, the absence of pleopods at the zoea IX suggests that H. abulbus has an extended planktonic larval phase that likely consists of at least 11 zoeal stages. The larvae of H. abulbus can be readily distinguished from other known Heterocarpus zoeae by the large size of their zoea I and for having four instead of three setae on the first segment of the endopod of the second maxilliped in zoea II and subsequent stages. © 2016 by The Crustacean Society. Published by Brill NV, Leiden.


Endo H.,Kochi University | Liao Y.-C.,National Museum of Marine Science and Technology | Matsuura K.,National Museum of Nature and Science
Ichthyological Research | Year: 2015

A new owstoniine bandfish, Owstonia kamoharai, is described based on six specimens (147–402 mm in standard length) collected from off southern Japan: Shikoku Island, Kii Peninsula, and Suruga Bay. The new species differs from its congeners by the following combination of characters: dorsal-fin rays III, 21; anal-fin rays I, 14; pectoral-fin rays 21–23; total caudal-fin rays 17 (branched 13); vertebrae 28–29; gill rakers on first arch 39–40; cheek with 88–123 scales in 8–10 rows; lateral line without branch, not forming loop in front of dorsal fin, ending below 8th–10th dorsal-fin soft rays; scales in longitudinal rows 53–56; lower margin of preopercle smooth; pelvic fin short, not reaching to anus; posterior margin of caudal fin rounded; uniformly reddish coloration with black markings on membranes of both jaws; and white margins of vertical fins. © 2015 The Ichthyological Society of Japan


Lee S.-W.,National Museum of Marine Science and Technology
Geologica Carpathica | Year: 2014

Mantodea are very rare in the fossil record. 28 fossil species are reported since the earliest occurrence of mantodeans in the Upper Jurassic (Tithonian). Here, I describe Cretophotina santanensis n. sp. from the Aptian (Lower Cretaceous) Crato Formation of Chapada do Araripe (northeastern Brazil). This species is characterized by long antenna and primitive raptorial forelegs. Morphological characters shared with the living genus Chaeteessa would support its assignment to the family Chaeteessidae. The tropical occurrence of the Early Cretaceous genus Cretophotina in Gondwana, together with occurrences of the genus Chaetessa from subtropical and temperate zones of Laurasia, implies that members of the family Chaeteessidae achieved nearly cosmopolitan distribution during the Early Cretaceous.

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