National Iranian Gas Company

www.iraniangas.ir/Portal/Home/
Tehran, Iran

The National Iranian Gas Company was established in 1965 as one of the four principal companies affiliated to the Ministry of Petroleum of the Islamic Republic of Iran with 25,000 million Rials initial capital.NIGC is responsible for the treatment, transmission, and delivery of natural gas to the domestic, industrial, and commercial sectors and power plants. The National Iranian Gas Exports Company was created in 2003 to manage and to supervise all gas pipeline and LNG projects. Until May 2010, NIGEC was under the control of the NIOC, but the Petroleum Ministry transferred NIGEC, incorporating it under NIGC in an attempt to broaden responsibility for new natural gas projects.As at 2012, 12,750 villages have been connected to gas network. NIGC does not play a role in awarding upstream gas projects; that task remains in the hands of the National Iranian Oil Company. Iran has the largest gas network in the world with 30,000 kilometres of high-pressure pipelines. Wikipedia.

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Mesgarian R.,National Iranian Gas Company
Proceedings of the International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management | Year: 2016

The completion of a sweetening solvent change from Di ethanol Amine (DEA) into methyl Di ethanol Amine (MDEA) in sour gas sweetening units conducted offspec flash gas. Flash gas lined up directly from flash drums to incinerators in the sulfur recovery units (SRU), area was completely implemented in 2014. The flash drum gas is an off-spec gas with a high concentration of carbon dioxide. The fundamental objective is to use this low Btu, high CO2 gas as a low cost fuel. Scrubbing the gas to remove the CO2 makes it complicate and too costly to use as a fuel. However, if this gas could be blended with higher Btu spec gas typically supplied to incinerators, it would meet the objective of providing a lower cost fuel while volumetrically reducing the CO2 content of the final mixture. Fuel gases with large percentages of an inert gas such as Carbon Dioxide will have a ratio of rich-to-lean flammability limits less than that of natural gas. Flammability ratios of less than 2.2 to 1 based on volume at standard conditions (14.7 psia and 15 °C), may experience problems maintaining stable combustion over the full operating range of the combustion incinerator burners. Burners can operate with fuel gases having a very wide range of heating values, but the amount of variation that a specific fuel system design can accommodate is limited, usually ± 5%. The fuel nozzles are designed to operate within a fixed range of pressure ratios and changes in heating values are accommodated by increasing or decreasing the fuel nozzle area or the fuel gas temperature. Since changing the fuel nozzle area is difficult, the temperature of the fuel gas is generally changed to accommodate significant changes in the heating values. The project objective was to design and install a blending stations utilizing either Btu or Wobbe Index as the basis to blend the gases such that the resulting fuel would be a lower cost alternative, and meet burner firing requirements for the incinerator and environmental emissions limits. A temporary analyzer that could determine the composition of the natural gas in near real time mode was employed. The analyzer outputs, as well as other instrumentation, were brought into the plant's DCS for operator monitoring and control of the gas blending stations. Our research of the Wobbe Index indicated that the preferred blending control mode should be based on the Wobbe Index. However, there did not appear to be any distinct advantage in using the Wobbe Index over the heating value or Btu. Since usually both Btu and Wobbe Index outputs are available from the gas analyzers, the logic configuration could developed such that the Operator select either Btu or Wobbe Index as the basis for controlling fuel gas blending. The project evaluated two methods of blending, those being a single blending system at the plant gas yard or individual blending systems at each unit. However, the incinerators chose multiple blending systems because they intended to burn the blended gas only in the gas burners and felt the additional operability offset the cost of the additional blending stations. This would allow the plant to determine which method gave them the best control of the blending stations. We know that the maximum limit of the Low Btu fuel gas is a 50% ratio, but the minimum limit (low flow) is set by blending system characteristics. To ensure trouble free start-ups, plant Operations prefers to start the burners of incinerator on Hi Btu fuel gas. Once the unit is online and operating reliability; at a given load, the Operator places the blending station in service. The success of the blending station depends on the quality of the temporary analyzer signals. If the blending station analyzer fails, the blending control is automatically, or by Operator action, placed on flow control and the Hi Btu gas remains on pressure control. If the gas yard analyzer fails, the station is automatically placed on flow control (Low Btu gas) and pressure control (Hi Btu gas). During the start-up phase of the project, both methods of controlling the blending stations were tested. There were no significant differences found between controlling based on Btu or Wobbe Index. Because the Wobbe Index is incremented in finer divisions, one would expect that finer blending control could be obtained, but for this application, very fine adjustments to the blending ratio are not necessary. The Low Btu gas on flow control is the default blending control method. This method was also tested, both as an Operator selected operational mode and as a default control mode when one of the analyzers fails. The plant is currently operating on flow control mode, selected by the Operator, because the Low Btu gas can yet provide enough gas to justify blending based on Btu or Wobbe Index. © IEOM Society International. © IEOM Society International.


Beni S.S.,National Iranian Gas Company
Proceedings of the International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management | Year: 2016

NIGC Inspection activities are based on Technical Inspection Statute in sub-companies. Individual inspection department activities is based on inspection policy. Inspection policy covers all inspection activities. Inspection & Technical Control Policy gives the general principles and guidelines on the Inspection, Technical Control and Testing of operation facilities, equipment and Material. Identify the inspection strategies are base on inspection policy and inspection activities. Result of functional assessment analysis would be applied by monitoring model using the indexes. Index selection is combination of scientific model & actual inspection activities. © IEOM Society International. © IEOM Society International.


Ghiasi M.M.,National Iranian Gas Company | Bahadori A.,Southern Cross University of Australia | Zendehboudi S.,University of Waterloo
Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering | Year: 2014

Natural gas usually contains a large amount of water and is fully saturated during production operations. In natural gas dehydration units' water vapor is removed from natural gas streams to meet sales specifications or other downstream gas processing requirements. Many methods and principles have been developed in the natural gas dehydration process for gaining high level of triethylene glycol (TEG) purity. Among them, reducing the pressure in the reboiler at a constant temperature results in higher glycol purity. The main objective of this communication is the development of an intelligent model based on the well-proven standard feed-forward back-propagation neural network for accurate prediction of TEG purity based on operating conditions of reboiler. Capability of the presented neural-based model in estimating the TEG purity is evaluated by employing several statistical parameters. It was found that the proposed smart technique reproduces the reported data in the literature with average absolute deviation percent being around 0.30%. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


The report covers forecast and analysis for the compressed natural gas market on a global and regional level. The study provides historic data of 2014 along with a forecast from 2015 to 2020 based on both volume (Million Cubic Meters) and revenue (USD Billion). The study includes drivers and restraints of the compressed natural gas market along with the impact they have on the demand over the forecast period. Additionally, the report includes the study of opportunities available in the compressed natural gas market on a global level. In order to give the users of this report a comprehensive view on the compressed natural gas, we have included a detailed competitive scenario and source portfolio of key vendors. To understand the competitive landscape in the market, an analysis of Porter’s five forces model for the compressed natural gas market has also been included. The study encompasses a market attractiveness analysis, wherein source segments are benchmarked based on their market size, growth rate and general attractiveness. The study provides a decisive view on the compressed natural gas market by segmenting the market based on source, applications and regions. All the segments have been analyzed based on present and future trends and the market is estimated from 2014 to 2020. Based on source, compressed natural gas market can segmented into associated gas, non-associated gas, and unconventional methods. Key application markets covered under this study includes light duty vehicles, medium/heavy duty buses, and medium/heavy duty trucks. The regional segmentation includes the current and forecast demand for North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, and Middle East and Africa with its further, Bifurcation into major countries including U.S., Germany, France, UK, China, Japan, India and Brazil. The report covers detailed competitive outlook including the market share and company profiles of the key participants operating in the global compressed natural gas market include Indraprastha Gas Limited (IGL), National Iranian Gas Company, Mahanagar gas Limited (MNGL), and J-W Power Company, OAO Gazprom, Trillium CNG, GNVert, ANGI Energy Systems Inc., NeoGas Inc., China Natural Gas Inc. and J-W Power Company. The detailed description of players includes parameters such as company overview, financial overview, business strategies and recent developments of the company. This report segments the global compressed natural gas market as follows:


Compressed Natural Gas (Associated Gas, Non-Associated Gas, Unconventional Methods) Market for Light Duty Vehicles, Medium/Heavy Duty Buses, Medium/Heavy Duty Trucks Applications: Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Segment, Trends and Forecast, 2014 – 2020 The report covers forecast and analysis for the compressed natural gas market on a global and regional level. The study provides historic data of 2014 along with a forecast from 2015 to 2020 based on both volume (Million Cubic Meters) and revenue (USD Billion). The study includes drivers and restraints of the compressed natural gas market along with the impact they have on the demand over the forecast period. Additionally, the report includes the study of opportunities available in the compressed natural gas market on a global level. In order to give the users of this report a comprehensive view on the compressed natural gas, we have included a detailed competitive scenario and source portfolio of key vendors. To understand the competitive landscape in the market, an analysis of Porter’s five forces model for the compressed natural gas market has also been included. The study encompasses a market attractiveness analysis, wherein source segments are benchmarked based on their market size, growth rate and general attractiveness. The study provides a decisive view on the compressed natural gas market by segmenting the market based on source, applications and regions. All the segments have been analyzed based on present and future trends and the market is estimated from 2014 to 2020. Based on source, compressed natural gas market can segmented into associated gas, non-associated gas, and unconventional methods. Key application markets covered under this study includes light duty vehicles, medium/heavy duty buses, and medium/heavy duty trucks. The regional segmentation includes the current and forecast demand for North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, and Middle East and Africa with its further, Bifurcation into major countries including U.S., Germany, France, UK, China, Japan, India and Brazil. The report covers detailed competitive outlook including the market share and company profiles of the key participants operating in the global compressed natural gas market include Indraprastha Gas Limited (IGL), National Iranian Gas Company, Mahanagar gas Limited (MNGL), and J-W Power Company, OAO Gazprom, Trillium CNG, GNVert, ANGI Energy Systems Inc., NeoGas Inc., China Natural Gas Inc. and J-W Power Company. The detailed description of players includes parameters such as company overview, financial overview, business strategies and recent developments of the company. This report segments the global compressed natural gas market as follows:


Ghiasi M.M.,National Iranian Gas Company | Shahdi A.,Islamic Azad University at Tehran | Barati P.,Petroleum University of Technology of Iran | Arabloo M.,Islamic Azad University at Tehran
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research | Year: 2014

Knowledge of the phase behavior of condensate gas systems is important for predicting reservoir performance and future processing needs. In this communication, new improved models are developed to calculate the gas phase and two phase compressibility factors based on constant volume depletion (CVD) analysis of the well stream effluent at any depleted state in retrograde gas condensate systems. These methods are based on compositional analysis of more than 1300 compositions of gas condensates collected worldwide. The average absolute relative deviation and correlation coefficient of the developed models from experimental gas phase and two phase compressibility factor values were about 0.73% and 0.998 and 1.30% and 0.992, respectively. This study also presents an evaluation of 120 possible methods of calculating the gas compressibility factor for gas condensates. The accuracy of the new models has been compared to all 120 methods. The comparison indicates that the proposed models are consistent, reliable, and superior to all the methods. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


Tavan Y.,National Iranian Gas Company | Shahhosseini S.,Iran University of Science and Technology | Hosseini S.H.,Ilam University
Separation and Purification Technology | Year: 2014

Separation of azeotropic mixtures is one of the most energy intensive systems in petrochemical industries. In the present study effect of feed-splitting on energy demand of the extractive distillation of CO 2-ethane azeotropic process is studied by means of Hysys process simulation software and relevant optimization analysis. Two alternatives are proposed for using feed-splitting technique in the process. The proposal presented in this work is splitting the feed before entering it to the heat exchanger in such a way of keeping a proper fraction of the feed at its original temperature and the rest being heated up with the warmer bottom product. A comparison between the results of the feed-splitting configurations and the conventional process in terms of total energy demand and environmental problems are carried out to determine the best scheme. It is observed that the best scheme of feed splitting technique in its optimized state leads to 56% reduction in energy demand in comparison with the conventional process. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Tavan Y.,National Iranian Gas Company | Hosseini S.H.,Ilam University
Chemical Engineering and Processing | Year: 2013

The vapor phase dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis is simulated by Hysys process simulation software and relevant cost analysis is also conducted. Based on cost estimation results, it is found that capital investment of the classic DME process is greatly influenced by the distillation towers and operating costs. Accordingly, to solve these problems an innovative DME process based on a top-wall dividing-wall column (DWC) in vapor phase is proposed, in this work. It is shown that the novel proposed DWC process leads to 44.53% reduction in operating costs compared to the conventional one, while both schemes predict almost the same output specifications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Tavan Y.,National Iranian Gas Company
Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering | Year: 2014

The azeotropes are always considered as a serious problem in chemical industries and most of the published researches on the subject of CO2-ethane azeotropic process are focused on distillation columns and heat exchangers, in order to separate these components. The present study is aimed to remove this azeotrope with the help of reaction and the azeotropic mixture is introduced to an industrial reformer to produce syngas (H2 and CO), as a novel work. In order to simulate reforming process, two dimensional mathematical modeling is proposed and coke formation as main problem of reforming process is thermodynamically investigated. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Tavan Y.,National Iranian Gas Company
Energy Conversion and Management | Year: 2014

Two-dimensional mathematical model is used for natural gas reforming to produce syngas. It is seen that coke formation by the Boudouard reaction is significant in entrance of the reactor and the maximum temperature gradient between the bed centerline and the wall is predicted to be 350 K. In order to reduce carbon filament formation and to avoid tube failure, heating value of the combustible fluid is increased to 15.5% by introducing ethane component as combustible fluid and the results show a better performance for reforming process in terms of lower coking and lower tube failure as compared to the industrial conditions. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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