National Institute of Public Health and National Institute of Hygiene

Warsaw, Poland

National Institute of Public Health and National Institute of Hygiene

Warsaw, Poland
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Piskorska-Pliszczynska J.,National Veterinary Research Institute | Maszewski S.,National Veterinary Research Institute | Mikolajczyk S.,National Veterinary Research Institute | Pajurek M.,National Veterinary Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2017

Dried feed materials, such as sugar beet pellets, may be a source of high levels of PCDD/Fs. The studies followed up dioxin congener elimination from contaminated milk (5.02 ± 1.39 pg WHO PCDD/F-PCBs-TEQ g−1 fat) up to 338 days after withdrawal of polluted feed ingredient (4.37 ± 0.25 ng PCDD/F/DL-PCBs-TEQ kg−1 feed). The main objectives of the study were to estimate the length of the time needed to achieve an acceptable PCDD/F milk level as set by European Union law, to track the fate of the PCDD/F congeners, and to assess the potential risk for consumers associated with long-term consumption of contaminated milk. After approximately 200 days, the PCDD/F levels reached ML (2.5 pg WHO-TEQ g−1 fat), then decreased to the action level after more than 300 days (1.75 pg WHO-TEQ g−1 fat) for most of cows. The potential risk of PCDD/F/DL-PCBs intake was characterised by comparing the theoretically calculated weekly and monthly intakes with the toxicological reference values (TRVs). The dioxin intake for the average adult and high-milk consumers did not exceed half of any of the TRVs applied (TWI, PTMI). The consumption of milk by children in the amount recommended by nutritionists (500 ml day–1) resulted in an exposure equal to 317% TWI and 275% PTMI. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Zasada A.A.,National Institute of Public Health and National Institute of Hygiene | Forminska K.,National Institute of Public Health and National Institute of Hygiene | Ogrodnik A.,National Institute of Public Health and National Institute of Hygiene | Gierczynski R.,National Institute of Public Health and National Institute of Hygiene | Jagielski M.,National Institute of Public Health and National Institute of Hygiene
Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2014

Introduction and objective. Anthrax spores remain viable and infectious in soil for decades. Flood water can percolate towards the surface the spores buried in soil. Moreover, the flood water might transport spores to areas previously unaffected. After the water recedes the spores located on the surface of the ground can be consumed by grazing animals and cause outbreaks of anthrax.Materials and method. Soil samples were collected in areas of Poland most affected by floods in 2010 (Lubelskie, Świętokrzyskie, Podkarpackie and Mazowieckie provinces). After heating with the aim to kill vegetative forms of bacteria, the samples were cultured on PLET agar and the resulted colonies were investigated in terms of motility and presence of anthrax specific chromosomal (SG-749, plcR) and plasmid markers (capB, pagA).Results. In total, 424 spore-forming, aerobically growing isolates were collected from the tested soil samples. Eighty-nine of them were non-motile. All the isolates were negative in PCR for anthrax specific chromosomal and plasmid markers.Conclusions. Spores of B. anthracis that could be related to risk of anthrax outbreaks were not detected in soil samples tested in this study. The negative results presented may not be proof that Poland is country free of anthrax. The results, however, may suggest a relatively low risk of anthrax outbreaks being triggered in the sampled areas. © Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine 2014.

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