National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico

Mexico City, Mexico

National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico

Mexico City, Mexico
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Ramirez-Bermudez J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Ramirez-Bermudez J.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Aguilar-Venegas L.C.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Crail-Melendez D.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences | Year: 2010

The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations. Copyright © 2010 American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.


Espinosa-Ramirez G.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Ordonez G.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Flores-Rivera J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Sotelo J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico
Neurological Research | Year: 2014

Objective: We analysed past and current sun exposure in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients as compared with matched controls in Mexico, a country with tropical climate. Methods: In a case-controlled study that include 83 MS patients and 166 matched controls, we inquired about sunlight exposure in two different periods: during adolescence and during the immediate past 5 years. Indicators were: exposure on quotidian and weekend outdoor activities with direct sunlight contact as expressed on frequency by mean number of days, daytime (morning, noon, afternoon), number of hours, visits to sunny places, and use of sunblocking agents. Additional elements were socioeconomic status, skin colour, and antecedent of varicella infection during childhood. Results: MS patients showed a larger proportion of white skin. MS patients had more sunlight exposure during adolescence (80% versus 60%, P50.002); this tendency prevailed on current indicators (46% versus 30%, P50.02). However, current exposure on weekends (10% versus 22%, P50.02) and visits to the beach (64% versus 98%, P50.002) were lower in MS than in controls. Discussion: Mexico gets more sunlight through the year than areas with high incidence of MS; nevertheless, its prevalence has greatly increased over the last decades, making it a relevant emerging disease. Our results indicate that in a tropical country, there is no association between sunlight exposure and the risk to develop MS, given the immunological effects of sunlight exposure either through UV radiation or vitamin D metabolism. © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2014.


Morales-Briceno H.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Cervantes-Arriaga A.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Rodriguez-Violante M.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Calleja-Castillo J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Corona T.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria | Year: 2012

Underweight and malnutrition are well documented in Parkinson's disease (PD), while overweight has been less reported. We carried out a cross-sectional study including 177 healthy controls and 177 PD patients attending a tertiary care center. We recorded weight and height for all participants. A statistically significant difference was found in body mass index (BMI) between controls and PD patients (29.1±5.4 versus 27.2±4.7, p<0.001). In the PD Group, two patients were underweight, 32.7% were within normal range, 46.9% had overweight, and 19.2% were obese. Overweight and normal weight were more prevalent in the PD Group (p=<0.01 and <0.001, respectively) when compared to controls. In conclusion, overweight/obesity are common among patients with PD, while underweight is almost negligible.


Sotelo J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico
Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology | Year: 2014

From all biological constituents of complex organisms, two are highly sophisticated: the nervous and the immune systems. Interestingly, their goals and processes appear to be distant from each other; however, their physiological mechanisms keep notorious similarities. Both construct intelligence, learn from experience, and keep memory. Their precise responses to innumerable stimuli are delicately modulated, and the exposure of the individual to thousands of potential challenges integrates their functionality; they use a large part of their constituents not in excitatory activities but in the maintenance of inhibitory mechanisms to keep silent vast intrinsic potentialities. The nervous and immune systems are integrated by a basic cell lineage (neurons and lymphocytes, respectively) but each embodies countless cell subgroups with different and specialized deeds which, in contrast with cells from other organs, labyrinthine molecular arrangements conduct to “one cell, one function”. Also, nervous and immune actions confer identity that differentiates every individual from countless others in the same species. Both systems regulate and potentiate their responses aided by countless biological resources of variable intensity: hormones, peptides, cytokines, pro-inflammatory molecules, etc. How the immune and the nervous systems buildup memory, learning capability, and exquisite control of excitatory/inhibitory mechanisms constitute major intellectual challenges for contemporary research. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Sotelo J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Ordonez G.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Pineda B.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Flores J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico
Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery | Year: 2014

Objective Recent studies have documented the apparent participation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in the etiopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). The present study aimed to corroborate the possible presence of VZV during exacerbations of MS. Design Fifty-three patients with definite MS were included; of them, 31 were studied during the first week of a clinical relapse, whereas 16 were studied during remission; 6 patients with progressive MS were also studied. Genes from 5 herpes viruses: varicella zoster, herpes simplex 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr and herpes 6 were studied by polymerase chain reaction in cerebrospinal fluid and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As controls 21 patients with inflammatory or functional neurological disorders were included. Results DNA from varicella zoster virus was found in the CSF from all MS patients studied during relapse (100%) and in the PBMC from 28 of them (90%). However, VZV DNA was found in the CSF only in 5 MS patients studied during remission (31%) and in the PBMC from 3 of them (19%). VZV DNA was also found, but in lower amounts, in the CSF (83%) and PBMC (33%) from patients with progressive MS. In contrast, VZV was not found either in CSF or in PBMC from controls. Results from the other herpes viruses tested were similar in MS patients and in controls. Conclusions Our results corroborate the conspicuous, but ephemeral presence of VZV during relapses of MS and support the idea of VZV involvement in the etiopathogenesis of MS. Recent epidemiological and molecular studies as well as reports of severe VZV infections triggered by specifically induced immunosuppression during therapy of MS give additional support to this potential association. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Aguirre-Cruz L.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Flores-Rivera J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | De La Cruz-Aguilera D.L.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Rangel-Lpez E.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Corona T.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico
Autoimmunity | Year: 2011

Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest that the prevalence, median age of onset, and specific phenotypes of multiple sclerosis (MS) are different in Caucasians and Latino Americans. Recent epidemiological studies indicate an increase in MS prevalence in Latin America (LA), where the southnorth gradient of latitude described for Nordic countries does not exist. Analysis of MS epidemiological and specific aspects in LA suggests that susceptibility and clinical behavior of the disease are related to mixtures and admixtures of genes in the population. MS is not present in Amerindians with Mongoloid genes, such as occurs in other pure ethnic groups. Surely, future studies will be carried out to obtain more reliable information. In this review, we contrast and analyze the available data of MS in LA and endemic countries. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.


Sotelo J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico
Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports | Year: 2011

Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic disease of the human brain. Modern imaging studies, CT and MRI, have defined the diagnosis and characterization of the disease. Through these studies the therapeutic approach for each case may be individualized with the aid of antihelmintics, steroids, symptomatic medicines, or surgery. The use of one or various therapeutic measures largely depends on the peculiar combination of number, location, and biological stage of lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response to the parasites. Although there is not a typical clinical picture of NCC, epilepsy is the most frequent manifestation of parenchymal NCC, whereas hydrocephalus is the most frequent manifestation of meningeal NCC. Eradication of cysticercosis is an attainable goal by public education and sanitary improvement in endemic areas. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Ramirez-Bermudez J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Espinola-Nadurille M.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Loza-Taylor N.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico
General Hospital Psychiatry | Year: 2010

Objective: Delusional parasitosis has been described in a wide range of patients with general medical conditions, but there are few reports about its frequency and possible pathogenic mechanisms in neurological patients. This paper describes this delusional syndrome in a sample of neurological patients. Methods: We reviewed all clinical charts of hospitalized patients at the neuropsychiatry ward of a neurological center, from January 2005 to June 2009. Cases with delusional parasitosis were described in terms of demographic, clinical and brain imaging features. Results: From a total sample of 1598 patients, we identified 636 patients with neurological disease (39.80%); of these, four patients showed delusional parasitosis (0.62% of the neurological sample). Their diagnoses were brain cysticercosis (n=1), cerebrovascular disease (n=2), and dementia due to vitamin B12 deficit (n=1). They were women in late life, with depressive features. Three of them had significant cognitive decline. Two of them had paraesthesia and pruritus related to peripheral neuropathy. One of them had pruritus of unknown origin (possibly hallucinatory). Conclusions: Delusional parasitosis was infrequent in this sample of hospitalized neurological patients. Female sex, advanced age, depressive features, cognitive decline, pruritus and paraesthesia of peripheral or central origin may contribute to delusional parasitosis in this population. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Palencia G.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Rubio C.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Custodio-Ramirez V.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Paz C.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | Sotelo J.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico
Epilepsy Research | Year: 2011

Thalidomide was synthesized more than 50 years ago as hypnotic sedative with unique pharmacologic properties. Recently, we have described a notorious anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. Here, we report the results of thalidomide administration on amygdaloid kindling. A total of 100 male Wistar rats were implanted with brain electrodes in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus and the sensory motor cortex. After surgery the animals received a daily electric stimulus through the amygdaline electrode (500μA intensity, 60. Hz frequency, 1ms duration) until seizures appeared. The following treatment groups were made: (a) controls; (b) rats treated daily with thalidomide (10. mg/kg) or with topiramate (80. mg/kg); (c) rats treated with different doses of thalidomide. Significant reduction in the after-discharge and retard of behavioral stages were observed in rats treated with thalidomide or with topiramate as compared with controls (p<0.01): Also, a similar anticonvulsant outcome of thalidomide therapy was obtained with doses of either 2.5, 5, 10 or 50. mg/kg; at 100. mg/kg all epileptic activity was suppressed. Anticonvulsant efficacy of thalidomide was superior in most parameters than that obtained with topiramate. In amygdaloid kindling, which simulates human epilepsy characterized by focal seizures secondarily generalized, low doses of thalidomide display strong anticonvulsant properties. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Julian J.A.S.,Hospital la Fe | Lloret P.M.,Hospital la Fe | Ruiz-Valdepenas E.C.,Hospital la Fe | Coll J.B.,National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico | And 2 more authors.
Acta Neurochirurgica | Year: 2011

Introduction The expanded endonasal approaches to the skull base are modular approaches that arise from the sphenoidal sinus. The reconstructive techniques in these approaches are key to avoid postoperative complications. Available flaps for reconstruction include the pedicled nasoseptal flap, the transpterygoid temporoparietal fascia flap, and the posterior pedicle inferior turbinate flap (PPITF), among others. Recently, the middle turbinate flap has been described in a cadaveric study. We report our preliminary experience in the use of this middle turbinate vascularized flap for skull base reconstruction after expanded endonasal approaches. Material and methods Ten patients underwent reconstructive procedures with the mucoperiostial vascularized middle turbinate flap. Capability to cover the defect, closure success, operative time and complications related to the procedure are retrospectively analyzed. Results A satisfactory closure was obtained in all procedures, and there were no complications related to the technique. Required operative time was similar to the time employed for the nasoseptal flap. Conclusions The vascularized middle turbinate flap is a reliable reconstructive technique for the reconstruction of moderate-sized skull base defects. It can be considered either as the first choice of closure or as an alternative to the nasoseptal flap when this is not available. Different flap combinations may facilitate skull base defect reconstruction. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

Loading National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico collaborators
Loading National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico collaborators