National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants

Fès, Morocco

National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants

Fès, Morocco
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El Ouali Lalami A.,EL Ghassani Hospital | El Ouali Lalami A.,Health Diagnostic Laboratory | El-Akhal F.,EL Ghassani Hospital | El-Akhal F.,University Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research | Year: 2016

The use of synthetic larvicides to control vector populations is detrimental to human and environmental health and selects for insecticide resistance. Plants can be alternative sources of effective and safe mosquito control agents. In the present work the chemical composition and larvicidal activity, of essential oil of Lavandula stoechas (lamiaceae), growing in wilds of Morocco, against the malaria vector Anopheles labranchiae (Diptera: Culicidae), were studied. The obtained percent yield of the hydro-distilled volatile oil from aerial parts of Lavandula stoechas, was 1.74 ± 0.24. The GC/MS analysis of Lavandula stoechas essential oil has led to the identification of 20 components. Camphor (36.14%), 1.8-Cineole (25.16%), Camphene (11.44%) and Fenchone (9.08 %), were the major constituents of which. The biological test performed using a methodology that is inspired from WHO standard protocol, revealed that the essential oil of Lavandula has larvicidal properties. The minimal dose required to achieve 100% larvicidal effect on Anopheles labranchiae was 500 mg/l for essential oil of Lavandula stoechas. The Lethal Concentration (LC50 and LC90) values were 112.51 mg/l and 294.51 mg/l respectively. The relationship between the chemical composition and biological activity of essential oil of Lavandula stoechas is confirmed by the above-mentioned results. Therefore, the potential for exploiting these essential oils, such as bioinsecticides for vector control, can be taken into account. © 2016, International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research. All rights reserved.


El Ouali Lalami A.,EL Ghassani Hospital | El-Akhal F.,EL Ghassani Hospital | Ez Zoubi Y.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | Taghzouti K.,Mohammed V University
International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research | Year: 2016

Mosquitos, including Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae), are the responsible vectors for the transmission of several deadly disease: Dengue fever, Japanese encephalitis, Filariais, Yellow fever… The use of synthetic larvicidal cause’s negative effects on organisms and environment. Most of mosquitoes such as Culex pipiens, are becoming resistant to these chemicals. In the present study, the ethanolic extract from Salvia officinalis grown in Morocco was analyzed and studied for its insecticidal effect on the Culex pipiens as well as has been compared against Temephos, the insecticide which is currently used for larval control. The phytochemical investigation was studied using a simple qualitative analysis method and the biological test was performed using a methodology inspired the WHO standard protocol. The percent yield of the hydro-ethanolic extract from aerial parts of Salvia officinalis was 12,3 ± 1.2%. Presence of flavonoids, tannins, catechic tannins, sterols and terpenes, glycosides, gallic tannins and mucilage have been observed. The biological test revealed that the extract from Salvia officinalis has remarkable larvicidal properties. The minimum levels necessary to achieve 100% larval mortality of Culex pipiens was valued at 600 ppm. The LC50and LC90lethal concentration measured for the extracts of Salvia officinalis appears to be effective with respective values of about 287 ppm and 487 ppm. The insecticidal activity of ethanolic extract from Salvia officinalis plants against Culex pipiens has not been studied previously in Morocco. This extract has provided valuable mortality of Culex pipiens and can be used as botanical insecticides in integrated management programs of this mosquito vector of diseases. © 2016, International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research. All rights reserved.


Ech-Chahad A.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | Farah H.,BP 577 | Lamiri A.,BP 577
International Journal of PharmTech Research | Year: 2013

Starting from 2-nitrophenylacetic acid, the synthesis of some pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoline derivaives has been reduced to an experimentally simple three-step operation.


Smahane B.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | Dalila B.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | Latifa E.M.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | Aicha N.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of hydro-ethanolic extract from Silene vulgaris (Moench) Garcke leaves. Five methods were used for antioxidant activity, which are 2, 2’-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and Hydroxyl Radical Scavenging Activity (HRSA) assays and the protective effect of DNA damage was also evaluated. The chemical composition of extract, were evaluated like total polyphenolic contents (TPC), catechins, tannins and O-diphenols. The extract was found to possess a significant antioxidant activity with ABTS, DPPH, FRAP and HRSA assays using Trolox as a standard with a IC50 value 2.05 mg/ml compared to that of the reference standard Trolox for TEAC ABTS assay. The effects on DNA damage provide a partially protective effect against DNA fragmentation. © 2015, International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research. All rights reserved.


El-Akhal F.,Health Diagnostic Laboratory | El-Akhal F.,University Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah | Guemmouh R.,University Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah | Ez Zoubi Y.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Parasitology Research | Year: 2015

Background. Outbreaks of the West Nile virus infection were reported in Morocco in 1996, 2003, and 2010. Culex pipiens was strongly suspected as the vector responsible for transmission. In the North center of Morocco, this species has developed resistance to synthetic insecticides. There is an urgent need to find alternatives to the insecticides as natural biocides. Objective. In this work, the insecticidal activity of the extract of the local plant Nerium oleander, which has never been tested before in the North center of Morocco, was studied on larval stages 3 and 4 of Culex pipiens. Methods. Biological tests were realized according to a methodology inspired from standard World Health Organization protocol. The mortality values were determined after 24 h of exposure and LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. Results. The extract had toxic effects on the larvae of culicid mosquitoes. The ethanolic extract of Nerium oleander applied against the larvae of Culex pipiens has given the lethal concentrations LC50 and LC90 in the order of 57.57 mg/mL and 166.35 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion. This investigation indicates that N. oleander could serve as a potential larvicidal, effective natural biocide against mosquito larvae, particularly Culex pipiens. © 2015 Fouad El-Akhal et al.


PubMed | University Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah, Health Diagnostic Laboratory and National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
Type: | Journal: Journal of parasitology research | Year: 2015

Background. Outbreaks of the West Nile virus infection were reported in Morocco in 1996, 2003, and 2010. Culex pipiens was strongly suspected as the vector responsible for transmission. In the North center of Morocco, this species has developed resistance to synthetic insecticides. There is an urgent need to find alternatives to the insecticides as natural biocides. Objective. In this work, the insecticidal activity of the extract of the local plant Nerium oleander, which has never been tested before in the North center of Morocco, was studied on larval stages 3 and 4 of Culex pipiens. Methods. Biological tests were realized according to a methodology inspired from standard World Health Organization protocol. The mortality values were determined after 24h of exposure and LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. Results. The extract had toxic effects on the larvae of culicid mosquitoes. The ethanolic extract of Nerium oleander applied against the larvae of Culex pipiens has given the lethal concentrations LC50 and LC90 in the order of 57.57mg/mL and 166.35mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion. This investigation indicates that N. oleander could serve as a potential larvicidal, effective natural biocide against mosquito larvae, particularly Culex pipiens.


Jennan S.,University Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah | Jennan S.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | Farah A.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | Mahjoubi F.,University Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah
Journal of Materials and Environmental Science | Year: 2015

The present study reports on the extraction of phenolic compounds from aerial parts of Thymus hyemalis of Morocco. Box-Behnken Design (BBD), a widely used form of response surface methodology (RSM), was used to investigate the effect of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). Three independent variables including ethanol concentration (%), extraction time (min) and solvent-to-material ratio (mL/g) were studied. The results showed that the optimal UAE condition was obtained with an ethanol concentration of 72%, an extraction time of 37 min and a solvent-to-material ratio of 19 mL/g for total phenols, and an ethanol concentration of 70 %, an extraction time of 38 min and solvent-to-material ratio of 20 mL/g for the yield of extraction. The experimental values under optimal conditions were in good consistent with the predicted values.


Chaouki W.,National Institute for Oncology | Leger D.Y.,Laboratory of Biochemistry | Eljastimi J.,Laboratory of Biochemistry | Beneytout J.-L.,Laboratory of Biochemistry | Hmamouchi M.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
Pharmaceutical Biology | Year: 2010

Aristolochia baetica L. (Aristolochiaceae) and Origanum compactum Benth. (Lamiaceae) are native plants of Morocco used in traditional medicine. In order to systematically evaluate their potential activity on human breast cancer, four different polarity extracts from each plant were assessed in vitro for their antiproliferative effect on MCF-7 cells. As a result, several extracts of those plants showed potent cell proliferation inhibition on MCF-7 cells. Chloroform extract of A. baetica (IC50: 216.06±15 μg/mL) and ethyl acetate of O. compactum (IC50: 279.51±16 μg/mL) were the most active. Thin layer chromatography examination of the bioactive extracts of A. baetica and O. compactum showed the presence of aristolochic acid and betulinic acid, respectively. These results call for further studies of these extracts. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd.


PubMed | National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of therapeutics | Year: 2016

This study is designed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract (AE) of Cistus ladanifer L. leaves in experimental animal models. The central analgesic activity of C. ladanifer AE is studied using hot plate method in rats, and the acute anti-Inflammatory activity of C. ladanifer is investigated by rats paw edema induced by subplantar injection of 0.5% carrageenan into the right hind paw. Rats are pretreated with AE of C. ladanifer at different doses (150, 175, and 200 mg/kg, i.p.). The tramadol and indomethacin are used as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. Our results show that the AE of C. ladanifer exhibited anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects dose dependent. In anti-inflammatory activity, the AE of C. ladanifer at all doses reduced significantly the edema paw inflammation after carrageenan injection. Furthermore at 200 mg/kg, the effect of AE is highly important than that of other doses. In addition, the same AE demonstrates significant analgesic effect in thermal-induced pain model. So, this activity is proved by significant reduction of pain score after administration of AE at all doses. The nociception protection effects in this case are, respectively, 70.3%, 74.55%, and 93.33% after administration of AE of C. ladanifer at doses 150, 175, and 200 mg/kg b.w. The results of our findings suggest that AE of C. ladanifer has potential analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities with evidence of possible involvement of peripheral and central effects in its actions.


El Hamsas El Youbi A.,National Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
American Journal of Therapeutics | Year: 2016

This study is designed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract (AE) of Cistus ladanifer L. leaves in experimental animal models. The central analgesic activity of C. ladanifer AE is studied using hot plate method in rats, and the acute anti-Inflammatory activity of C. ladanifer is investigated by rats paw edema induced by subplantar injection of 0.5% carrageenan into the right hind paw. Rats are pretreated with AE of C. ladanifer at different doses (150, 175, and 200 mg/kg, i.p.). The tramadol and indomethacin are used as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. Our results show that the AE of C. ladanifer exhibited anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects dose dependent. In anti-inflammatory activity, the AE of C. ladanifer at all doses reduced significantly the edema paw inflammation after carrageenan injection. Furthermore at 200 mg/kg, the effect of AE is highly important than that of other doses. In addition, the same AE demonstrates significant analgesic effect in thermal-induced pain model. So, this activity is proved by significant reduction of pain score after administration of AE at all doses. The nociception protection effects in this case are, respectively, 70.3%, 74.55%, and 93.33% after administration of AE of C. ladanifer at doses 150, 175, and 200 mg/kg b.w. The results of our findings suggest that AE of C. ladanifer has potential analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities with evidence of possible involvement of peripheral and central effects in its actions. Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

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