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Ferreira R.,National Institute of Health
G3 (Bethesda, Md.) | Year: 2012

The knowledge of the frequency and relative weight of mutation and recombination events in evolution is essential for understanding how microorganisms reach fitted phenotypes. Traditionally, these evolutionary parameters have been inferred by using data from multilocus sequence typing (MLST), which is known to have yielded conflicting results. In the near future, these estimations will certainly be performed by computational analyses of full-genome sequences. However, it is not known whether this approach will yield accurate results as bacterial genomes exhibit heterogeneous representation of loci categories, and it is not clear how loci nature impacts such estimations. Therefore, we assessed how mutation and recombination inferences are shaped by loci with different genetic features, using the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis as the study model. We found that loci assigning a high number of alleles and positively selected genes yielded nonconvergent estimates and incongruent phylogenies and thus are more prone to confound algorithms. Unexpectedly, for the model under evaluation, housekeeping genes and noncoding regions shaped estimations in a similar manner, which points to a nonrandom role of the latter in C. trachomatis evolution. Although the present results relate to a specific bacterium, we speculate that microbe-specific genomic architectures (such as coding capacity, polymorphism dispersion, and fraction of positively selected loci) may differentially buffer the effect of the confounding factors when estimating recombination and mutation rates and, thus, influence the accuracy of using full-genome sequences for such purpose. This putative bias associated with in silico inferences should be taken into account when discussing the results obtained by the analyses of full-genome sequences, in which the "one size fits all" approach may not be applicable.


Ciccozzi M.,National Institute of Health
BMC infectious diseases | Year: 2012

Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) is one of the most pressing health emergencies in the world with a global prevalence of about 170 million people chronically infected worldwide. In Europe, Italy has the highest HCV prevalence (3 - 4.4%) with peaks of 12.6 - 26% in Southern regions and the major islands. In Italy HCV genotype 1b prevails, and genotype 4 is mainly found in the south of the country where the prevalence is particularly high in regions such as Calabria.Phylogenetics analysis is a molecular tool widely used to study rapidly-evolving RNA viruses that establish chronic infections such as HCV. Searching the scientific literature, it was found that thirty-nine genetic studies on HCV genotypes have been carried out in Italy between 1997 to 2012 years. However, phylogenetic analysis was performed only in fourteen out of thirty-nine HCV studies (36%) considered. Monitoring the genetic evolution of HCV is an essential step to control the local as well as global HCV epidemic and to develop efficient preventive and therapeutic strategies.


News Article | February 13, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Graphene - Here's What You Should Know Nanotechnology - What You Should Know The quest for expanding avenues of research with greater cost efficiency has been perennial. For making research thrive, greater access to technologies and resources is a basic prerequisite. That search now seems to have been answered. The launch of an online marketplace named clustermarket has dawned a "science on demand" outlet with resources ready for rent. It opened up a new path for companies and scientists to source expertise, lab space, and equipment beyond their institutions. Ensuring liberal access and decentralization of resources, clustermarket is positioning as a savior in boosting cost efficiency, speed, and broader participation in research projects. Launched in the UK, in partnership with Merck Accelerator, clustermarket is Britain's first online marketplace aiming the grassroots promotion of scientific research expansion and "access for all" in life sciences. This "science on demand" online platform has drawn inspiration from the AirBnB model and targets UK science administrators, experts, and institutions, with essential technologies on rent including equipment, software, infrastructure, and services. Setting the initial focus on life sciences, the e-market platform wants to make research and development more affordable and less time-consuming. The expanded access for research resources will positively impact the functioning of start-ups in making them more innovative. The trend of high costs smothering start-ups will be waning. "Before clustermarket, a scientist who required a mass spectrometer (a piece of equipment most commonly used in life science research) would have had to pay up to half a million GPB on top of other equipment needed," said CEO Johannes Solzbach. Now, clustermarket will offer the equipment on demand for enabling more research and breaking barriers to entry. The e-marketplace is a frontrunner in the democratization of scientific research which is a monopoly of big institutions and corporations. "By launching clustermarket today we have initiated change in the research process, making it faster and affordable, and creating a better outlook for all in the industry by providing a platform for collaboration and innovation," added Solzbach. When it comes to the U.S., the research funding agencies are mostly backed by the federal government outfits such as the National Institute of Health (NIH) for biomedical research and the National Science Foundation (NSF) for non-biomedical areas. There are also private organizations, venture capital, and private industry-supporting research. According to the NIH sources, only one in five grant applications get funding and it takes close to a year from the time of application to the actual funding. In any research project, the bulk of the budget goes into laboratory requirements that can be divided into the following segments. In equipment, the requirement ranges from refrigerators, cell culture hoods, centrifuges, PCR machines, to highly expensive microscopes and flow cytometers. The expensive instrument also jacks up maintenance costs, which will be 10 to 15 percent of the equipment's acquisition costs on a yearly basis. The personnel costs are spread into the salaries and expenses incurred by graduate, undergraduate students, post-doctoral fellows and laboratory technicians among others. A post-doc needs to be paid a fellowship or teaching assistantships. The budget for lab supplies is another high-cost area. Good money is needed in paying for the materials used in a lab, be it pipette tips, ELISA kits, and antibodies. These consumables cost at least $20,000 per year depending on the number of people. Meanwhile, a startup in London has devised a new model to make the hiring of scientists, especially data scientists an easy exercise with the Uber-like model. Launched by Pivigo, the marketplace aims to help small companies to hire researchers on a project basis. Many small companies are unable to afford an in-house data scientist or expensive consulting firms. "These firms typically don't have any analytic skills in-house and they don't have huge budgets to spend for KPMG or Accenture to come in and do a big, expensive project," said Kim Nilsson, Pivigo's chief executive officer. The startup is ready to help small firms as they have 1,500 data scientists on their rolls for specific projects. The firm was into training researchers hired by clients like KPMG, Barclays, Marks & Spencer, and Royal Mail. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Nexstim Plc (NXTMH:HEX, NXTMS:STO) ("Nexstim" or "Company"), a medical technology company with a pioneering navigated non-invasive brain stimulation system, today presented the final results of a multi-center Phase III trial in stroke rehabilitation (NICHE trial) assessing the Company's Navigated Brain Therapy system (NBT®) at the International Stroke Conference in Houston, TX.  The presentation, by the trial Principal Investigator, Richard L. Harvey, MD, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, summarised the main safety and efficacy results of the NICHE trial, previously announced in March 2016. The safety results were good with no serious adverse events (SAE) related to the use of Nexstim NBT® system. The primary outcome measure of significant clinical improvement of upper extremity motor function, defined as an increase of at least 5 points on the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer scale (UEFM) between baseline and six months after end of trial therapy, was reached by 67% of subjects in the active Nexstim NBT® trial arm and 65% in the sham NBT® trial arm. In the full trial population, the average improvement on UEFM was 8.2 points. The secondary outcome measures including Action Research Arm Test; Wolf-Motor Function Test; Stroke Impact Scale; National Institute of Health Stroke Scale; Chedoke McMaster Stroke Assessment for Hand and Arm and the quality of life instrument ED-5Q, demonstrated a statistically significant improvement from baseline to 6 months after end of trial therapy in both trial arms (p<0.001 for each trial arm). As previously announced, the difference between trial arms was not statistically significant. A journal article describing the full trial results is in preparation. Commenting on the results, Jarmo Laine, Vice President Medical Affairs stated: "The efficacy results obtained in NICHE show functional improvement in both trial arms. As previously announced by Nexstim, we believe the sham trial arm was not a true sham. Nexstim has now agreed a new 60 patient supplementary clinical trial with the FDA. We remain confident, given the results from the active arm of the NICHE study, that we can provide an important improvement in treatment for post-acute stroke patients as they undergo rehabilitation from this debilitating disease." In line with the FDA recommendation the data from the ongoing trial will be combined with data from the NICHE study in order to supplement the de novo 510(k) submission. Nexstim estimates it will receive efficacy results from the on-going 60 patient trial in Q1 2018. The combined results are then expected to be used to support a de novo 510(k) response in the summer or the fall of 2018. Clearance of this de novo 510(k) would allow Nexstim to start marketing and selling its NBT® system for stroke rehabilitation in the USA. Further information is available on the website www.nexstim.com or by telephone: About Nexstim Plc Nexstim is a medical technology company which has pioneered its technology in brain diagnostics with the Navigated Brain Stimulation (NBS) system. It is the first and only FDA cleared and CE marked system based on navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (nTMS) for pre-surgical mapping of the speech and motor cortices of the brain. Based on the same technology platform, the Company has developed a system called Navigated Brain Therapy (NBT®) which is CE marked for the treatment of stroke, chronic neuropathic pain, and depression. Nexstim shares are listed on the Nasdaq First North Finland and Nasdaq First North Sweden. For more information please visit www.nexstim.com


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A combination of two cancer drugs inhibited both dengue and Ebola virus infections in mice in a study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers, despite the fact that these two viruses are vastly different from each other. In laboratory-dish experiments, the drug combination, which has previously shown efficacy against the hepatitis C virus, also was effective against West Nile and Zika viruses, both of which are relatives of the hepatitis C virus, and multiple other unrelated viruses. The multi-institution study, to be published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, also pinpointed the specific molecular mechanism by which these drugs derail a variety of RNA viruses, whose genetic material consists not of DNA but of its close relative, RNA. "We've shown that a single combination of drugs can be effective across a broad range of viruses -- even when those viruses hail from widely separated branches of the evolutionary tree," said the study's senior author, Shirit Einav, MD, assistant professor of infectious diseases and of microbiology and immunology. The study's lead authors are former Stanford postdoctoral scholars Elena Bekerman, PhD, now at Gilead Sciences Inc., and Gregory Neveu, PhD, now at the University of Lyon and French National Institute of Health and Medical Research. The reason the drugs used in the study are able to combat infections by such different viruses is that their disabling action is directed not at the virus but at proteins of the host cell it's trying to infect, Einav said. Einav and her team are investigating strategies for combatting RNA viruses, such as dengue and Ebola. These viruses have a faulty replication process that results in frequent errors as their genetic material is copied, rendering them especially prone to mutations. Consequently, they swiftly acquire resistance to a typical antiviral drug that targets a specific viral enzyme, Einav said. "The 'one drug, one bug' approach can be quite successful, as in the case of hepatitis C virus," for which a concerted effort has generated several approved antiviral treatments, she said. But it took more than 10 years of research, she noted, and drug development costs typically exceed $2 billion. Making matters worse, Einav added, is the impossibility of predicting what the next emerging viral threat will look like. "We're always getting blindsided," she said. The deadly Ebola epidemic of a few years ago has subsided but could return at any time. Dengue infects an estimated 390 million people annually in over 100 countries. Four distinct strains of the dengue virus exist, hampering the development of a vaccine and boosting the chances of a once-infected person's re-infection by a different strain against which that person hasn't achieved sufficient immunity. Secondary infections can become life-threatening. While an Ebola vaccine has shown promise, it's not yet approved. A recently approved dengue vaccine has only limited efficacy. No viable antiviral drugs are currently available for either virus. Viruses are cut-rate brigands: They produce nothing on their own, but rather hijack the machinery of our cells. Hepatitis C, dengue, Ebola and other viruses hop onto molecular "buses" that whisk cargo between cell compartments. These buses shuttle the viruses around inside of cells. The buses' routes and fares are regulated by numerous cellular enzymes. Two such enzymes, which go by the acronyms AAK1 and GAK, essentially lower the fares charged by the molecular buses by tweaking them so they bind more strongly to their cargo. The standard antiviral approach aims to disable a specific viral enzyme. Einav and her associates' alternative approach took advantage of viruses' total dependence on infected cells' molecular machinery. The two-drug drug combination Einav's team put to work against dengue and Ebola impedes AAK1's and GAK's activity, effectively pricing bus fares beyond the viral budget. Erlotinib and sunitinib, each approved by the Food and Drug Administration more than a decade ago, are prescribed for various cancer indications. Neither AAK1 nor GAK are the primary targets of these drugs in their cancer-fighting roles. But Einav's group discovered, by accessing publicly available databases, that the two drugs impair AAK1 and GAK activity, too. Einav and her colleagues previously demonstrated that erlotinib and sunitinib inhibit hepatitis C virus infection in cells. In the new study, the investigators conducted experiments in lab dishes to show that both drugs inhibit viral infection by impeding the activity of AAK1 and GAK. Next, they tested the combination in lab dishes against the dengue and Ebola viruses, and observed that viral activity was strongly inhibited in both. While the dengue virus is a relatively close cousin of hepatitis C, it is quite different from the Ebola virus. The same drug combination also showed efficacy against a variety of other RNA viruses related to hepatitis C, including the Zika and West Nile viruses, and even against several unrelated viruses. In a prevention experiment in mice, the investigators administered the erlotinib-sunitinib combination once daily starting on the day of dengue-virus infection, employing the two drugs for five days at doses comparable to those approved for use against cancer in humans. All the control mice died between days four and eight. But of those treated with the drug combination, 65 to 100 percent, depending on the individual experiment, survived and regained their pre-infection weight and mobility. Given individually, the drugs provided substantially less protection, Einav said. In another experiment designed to test the drugs as a therapy, the combination retained substantial antiviral efficacy as long as it was given less than 48 hours after infection. In a similar prevention experiment with the Ebola virus, the scientists administered the drug daily for 10 days starting at six hours before infection. Some 90 percent of the control mice died within a week or two. But half the mice receiving the drug combination survived. Again, the drugs were substantially less effective when given individually. Additional lab experiments showed that the combination profoundly inhibited the dengue virus's ability to develop drug resistance. There's no possible way for viral mutations to alter the proteins of the cells it infects, Einav said, and no easy way for the virus to mutate around its dependence on those proteins. Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing has filed for patents on intellectual property associated with the findings. Other Stanford study co-authors are Claude Nagamine, DVM, PhD, assistant professor of comparative medicine; and research scientist Robert Mateo, PhD. The study was carried out in collaboration with researchers from the University of Chicago, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Maryland, the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Leuven in Belgium. The study was funded by the National Institute of Health (grants IU19AI10966201 and U19A1083019); the American Cancer Society; the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; the Department of Defense; Stanford Bio-X; the Stanford Spark program; the Stanford Translational Research and Applied Medicine program; Spectrum, which administers Stanford's Clinical and Translational Science Award (grant UL1TR001085) from the NIH; the Stanford Child Health Research Institute; and the Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology. Stanford's departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology also supported the work. The Stanford University School of Medicine consistently ranks among the nation's top medical schools, integrating research, medical education, patient care and community service. For more news about the school, please visit http://med. . The medical school is part of Stanford Medicine, which includes Stanford Health Care and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford. For information about all three, please visit http://med. .


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., Feb. 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. (TOMI) (OTCQX:TOMZ), a global bacteria decontamination and infection prevention company, and its board of directors announced the formation and approval of  TOMI’s scientific advisory board. “We are honored William, Miguel and Helene – experts in intellectual property law, biosafety and infection prevention, respectively – have agreed to join our scientific advisory board,” stated Dr. Halden Shane, TOMI’s Chief Executive Officer. “We believe their support validates TOMI’s groundbreaking SteraMist™, and their guidance will help TOMI in "Innovating for a Safer World.” The team is charged with constructively challenging management to help develop strategy; ensuring the necessary resources are in place to enable us to achieve objectives in scientific research and development; and monitoring technological and regulatory trends that could impact our business as well as our performance against our goals. We believe their insight will be invaluable.” William M. Brown, PhD, MBA, JD William M. Brown, PhD, MBA, JD is a consultant and advisor to a series of biotech and life sciences companies. Dr. Brown is a seasoned attorney in intellectual property with deep experience in healthcare-related matters. He is licensed to practice law in several states and is a registered patent attorney. His consulting experience includes intellectual property portfolio management, clinical trial contracts, and patent/business development matters. He holds a PhD from the University of Southampton, England, an MBA from Fairleigh Dickinson University, and a JD from New York Law School. Dr. Brown conducted postdoctoral research at Harvard, Johnson & Johnson, NIH, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Miguel A. Grimaldo, MEng Miguel A. Grimaldo, MEng is an Assistant Professor for the Department of Pathology, Director of Institutional Biocontainment Resources at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) and the Director of the Biocontainment Engineering Division for the Galveston National Laboratory. His responsibilities include the review of all design, construction, commissioning and operation of High and Maximum containment laboratories as well as to ensure regulatory compliance and to conduct ongoing evaluation and recertification on all critical containment features, equipment and operations for Biosafety Level 3 (BSL‐3), Animal Biosafety Level 3 (ABSL3) and Biosafety Level 4 (BSL4) laboratory facilities at UTMB. He is also a member of the UTMB Institutional Biosafety Committee. He has served as Committee Member for development of the ANSI Z9.14‐2014 Standard ‐ Testing and Performance‐Verification Methodologies for Ventilation Systems for Biosafety Level 3 (BSL‐3) and Animal Biosafety Level 3 (ABSL‐3) facilities as well as for the 2016 Edition of the National Institute of Health (NIH) ‐ Design Requirements Manual (DRM) for Biomedical Laboratories and Animal Research Facilities. Miguel routinely serves as Biocontainment Advisor for containment laboratories nationally and internationally on design, construction and operations and also routinely contributes to a technical column in the American Biological Safety Association (ABSA) journal, Applied Biosafety entitled, “Containment Talk”. Mr. Grimaldo obtained his Masters of Engineering from the University of Louisville and Bachelor of Science degrees in Agricultural Engineering and Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University. Dr. Helene Paxton, MS, MT(ASCP), PhD, CIC Dr. Helene Paxton, MS, MT(ASCP), PhD, CIC, is an Infection Preventionist, owner of Bio Guidance, LLC, adjunct biology professor at Rowan University and Director of Infection Prevention at Saint Francis Healthcare. She is Infection Control Certified (CIC), board certified as an International Medical Laboratory Scientist and holds a PhD in Epidemiology. Dr. Paxton has 40 plus years’ experience in medical devices and infectious disease consulting. Dr. Paxton obtained her PhD from Kennedy Western University and her MS from Bowling Green State University. Scientific Advisory Board Provisions and criteria have been set in the company's bylaws and scientific advisory board charter. TOMI’s scientific advisory board will always observe in the letter and spirit the duties, rights and role as a member of the company's board as stipulated in the relevant listing standards. About TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. (OTCQX:TOMZ) is a global bacteria decontamination and infectious disease control company, providing eco-friendly environmental solutions for indoor surface disinfection through manufacturing, sales and licensing of its premier platform of Hydrogen Peroxide based product that uses Binary Ionization Technology® (BIT™) , a state of the art technology for the production of its Activated Ionized Hydrogen Peroxide mist represented by the TOMI™ SteraMist™ brand. TOMI’s products are designed to service a broad spectrum of commercial structures including hospitals and medical facilities, cruise ships, office buildings, hotel and motel rooms, schools, restaurants, for non-food safety in meat and produce processing facilities, military barracks, and athletic facilities. TOMI’s products and services have also been used in single-family homes and multi-unit residences. TOMI also develops training programs and application protocols for its clients and is a member in good standing with The American Biological Safety Association, The American Association of Tissue Banks, Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, The Restoration Industry Association, Indoor Air Quality Association, and The International Ozone Association. For additional product information, visit www.tomimist.com or contact us at info@tomimist.com. Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 Certain written and oral statements made by us may constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Reform Act”). Forward-looking statements are identified by such words and phrases as “we expect,” “expected to,” “estimates,” “estimated,” “current outlook,” “we look forward to,” “would equate to,” “projects,” “projections,” “projected to be,” “anticipates,” “anticipated,” “we believe,” “could be,” and other similar phrases. All statements addressing operating performance, events, or developments that we expect or anticipate will occur in the future, including statements relating to revenue growth, earnings, earnings-per-share growth, or similar projections, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Reform Act. They are forward-looking, and they should be evaluated in light of important risk factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from our anticipated results. The information provided in this document is based upon the facts and circumstances known at this time. We undertake no obligation to update these forward-looking statements after the date of this release.


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., Feb. 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. (TOMI) (OTCQX:TOMZ), a global bacteria decontamination and infection prevention company, and its board of directors announced the formation and approval of  TOMI’s scientific advisory board. “We are honored William, Miguel and Helene – experts in intellectual property law, biosafety and infection prevention, respectively – have agreed to join our scientific advisory board,” stated Dr. Halden Shane, TOMI’s Chief Executive Officer. “We believe their support validates TOMI’s groundbreaking SteraMist™, and their guidance will help TOMI in "Innovating for a Safer World.” The team is charged with constructively challenging management to help develop strategy; ensuring the necessary resources are in place to enable us to achieve objectives in scientific research and development; and monitoring technological and regulatory trends that could impact our business as well as our performance against our goals. We believe their insight will be invaluable.” William M. Brown, PhD, MBA, JD William M. Brown, PhD, MBA, JD is a consultant and advisor to a series of biotech and life sciences companies. Dr. Brown is a seasoned attorney in intellectual property with deep experience in healthcare-related matters. He is licensed to practice law in several states and is a registered patent attorney. His consulting experience includes intellectual property portfolio management, clinical trial contracts, and patent/business development matters. He holds a PhD from the University of Southampton, England, an MBA from Fairleigh Dickinson University, and a JD from New York Law School. Dr. Brown conducted postdoctoral research at Harvard, Johnson & Johnson, NIH, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Miguel A. Grimaldo, MEng Miguel A. Grimaldo, MEng is an Assistant Professor for the Department of Pathology, Director of Institutional Biocontainment Resources at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) and the Director of the Biocontainment Engineering Division for the Galveston National Laboratory. His responsibilities include the review of all design, construction, commissioning and operation of High and Maximum containment laboratories as well as to ensure regulatory compliance and to conduct ongoing evaluation and recertification on all critical containment features, equipment and operations for Biosafety Level 3 (BSL‐3), Animal Biosafety Level 3 (ABSL3) and Biosafety Level 4 (BSL4) laboratory facilities at UTMB. He is also a member of the UTMB Institutional Biosafety Committee. He has served as Committee Member for development of the ANSI Z9.14‐2014 Standard ‐ Testing and Performance‐Verification Methodologies for Ventilation Systems for Biosafety Level 3 (BSL‐3) and Animal Biosafety Level 3 (ABSL‐3) facilities as well as for the 2016 Edition of the National Institute of Health (NIH) ‐ Design Requirements Manual (DRM) for Biomedical Laboratories and Animal Research Facilities. Miguel routinely serves as Biocontainment Advisor for containment laboratories nationally and internationally on design, construction and operations and also routinely contributes to a technical column in the American Biological Safety Association (ABSA) journal, Applied Biosafety entitled, “Containment Talk”. Mr. Grimaldo obtained his Masters of Engineering from the University of Louisville and Bachelor of Science degrees in Agricultural Engineering and Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University. Dr. Helene Paxton, MS, MT(ASCP), PhD, CIC Dr. Helene Paxton, MS, MT(ASCP), PhD, CIC, is an Infection Preventionist, owner of Bio Guidance, LLC, adjunct biology professor at Rowan University and Director of Infection Prevention at Saint Francis Healthcare. She is Infection Control Certified (CIC), board certified as an International Medical Laboratory Scientist and holds a PhD in Epidemiology. Dr. Paxton has 40 plus years’ experience in medical devices and infectious disease consulting. Dr. Paxton obtained her PhD from Kennedy Western University and her MS from Bowling Green State University. Scientific Advisory Board Provisions and criteria have been set in the company's bylaws and scientific advisory board charter. TOMI’s scientific advisory board will always observe in the letter and spirit the duties, rights and role as a member of the company's board as stipulated in the relevant listing standards. About TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. (OTCQX:TOMZ) is a global bacteria decontamination and infectious disease control company, providing eco-friendly environmental solutions for indoor surface disinfection through manufacturing, sales and licensing of its premier platform of Hydrogen Peroxide based product that uses Binary Ionization Technology® (BIT™) , a state of the art technology for the production of its Activated Ionized Hydrogen Peroxide mist represented by the TOMI™ SteraMist™ brand. TOMI’s products are designed to service a broad spectrum of commercial structures including hospitals and medical facilities, cruise ships, office buildings, hotel and motel rooms, schools, restaurants, for non-food safety in meat and produce processing facilities, military barracks, and athletic facilities. TOMI’s products and services have also been used in single-family homes and multi-unit residences. TOMI also develops training programs and application protocols for its clients and is a member in good standing with The American Biological Safety Association, The American Association of Tissue Banks, Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, The Restoration Industry Association, Indoor Air Quality Association, and The International Ozone Association. For additional product information, visit www.tomimist.com or contact us at info@tomimist.com. Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 Certain written and oral statements made by us may constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Reform Act”). Forward-looking statements are identified by such words and phrases as “we expect,” “expected to,” “estimates,” “estimated,” “current outlook,” “we look forward to,” “would equate to,” “projects,” “projections,” “projected to be,” “anticipates,” “anticipated,” “we believe,” “could be,” and other similar phrases. All statements addressing operating performance, events, or developments that we expect or anticipate will occur in the future, including statements relating to revenue growth, earnings, earnings-per-share growth, or similar projections, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Reform Act. They are forward-looking, and they should be evaluated in light of important risk factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from our anticipated results. The information provided in this document is based upon the facts and circumstances known at this time. We undertake no obligation to update these forward-looking statements after the date of this release.


Nexstim Plc (NXTMH:HEX, NXTMS:STO) ("Nexstim" or "Company"), a medical technology company with a pioneering navigated non-invasive brain stimulation system, today presented the final results of a multi-center Phase III trial in stroke rehabilitation (NICHE trial) assessing the Company's Navigated Brain Therapy system (NBT®) at the International Stroke Conference in Houston, TX.  The presentation, by the trial Principal Investigator, Richard L. Harvey, MD, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, summarised the main safety and efficacy results of the NICHE trial, previously announced in March 2016. The safety results were good with no serious adverse events (SAE) related to the use of Nexstim NBT® system. The primary outcome measure of significant clinical improvement of upper extremity motor function, defined as an increase of at least 5 points on the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer scale (UEFM) between baseline and six months after end of trial therapy, was reached by 67% of subjects in the active Nexstim NBT® trial arm and 65% in the sham NBT® trial arm. In the full trial population, the average improvement on UEFM was 8.2 points. The secondary outcome measures including Action Research Arm Test; Wolf-Motor Function Test; Stroke Impact Scale; National Institute of Health Stroke Scale; Chedoke McMaster Stroke Assessment for Hand and Arm and the quality of life instrument ED-5Q, demonstrated a statistically significant improvement from baseline to 6 months after end of trial therapy in both trial arms (p<0.001 for each trial arm). As previously announced, the difference between trial arms was not statistically significant. A journal article describing the full trial results is in preparation. Commenting on the results, Jarmo Laine, Vice President Medical Affairs stated: "The efficacy results obtained in NICHE show functional improvement in both trial arms. As previously announced by Nexstim, we believe the sham trial arm was not a true sham. Nexstim has now agreed a new 60 patient supplementary clinical trial with the FDA. We remain confident, given the results from the active arm of the NICHE study, that we can provide an important improvement in treatment for post-acute stroke patients as they undergo rehabilitation from this debilitating disease." In line with the FDA recommendation the data from the ongoing trial will be combined with data from the NICHE study in order to supplement the de novo 510(k) submission. Nexstim estimates it will receive efficacy results from the on-going 60 patient trial in Q1 2018. The combined results are then expected to be used to support a de novo 510(k) response in the summer or the fall of 2018. Clearance of this de novo 510(k) would allow Nexstim to start marketing and selling its NBT® system for stroke rehabilitation in the USA. Further information is available on the website www.nexstim.com or by telephone: About Nexstim Plc Nexstim is a medical technology company which has pioneered its technology in brain diagnostics with the Navigated Brain Stimulation (NBS) system. It is the first and only FDA cleared and CE marked system based on navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (nTMS) for pre-surgical mapping of the speech and motor cortices of the brain. Based on the same technology platform, the Company has developed a system called Navigated Brain Therapy (NBT®) which is CE marked for the treatment of stroke, chronic neuropathic pain, and depression. Nexstim shares are listed on the Nasdaq First North Finland and Nasdaq First North Sweden. For more information please visit www.nexstim.com


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., Feb. 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. (TOMI) (OTCQX:TOMZ), a global bacteria decontamination and infection prevention company, and its board of directors announced the formation and approval of  TOMI’s scientific advisory board. “We are honored William, Miguel and Helene – experts in intellectual property law, biosafety and infection prevention, respectively – have agreed to join our scientific advisory board,” stated Dr. Halden Shane, TOMI’s Chief Executive Officer. “We believe their support validates TOMI’s groundbreaking SteraMist™, and their guidance will help TOMI in "Innovating for a Safer World.” The team is charged with constructively challenging management to help develop strategy; ensuring the necessary resources are in place to enable us to achieve objectives in scientific research and development; and monitoring technological and regulatory trends that could impact our business as well as our performance against our goals. We believe their insight will be invaluable.” William M. Brown, PhD, MBA, JD William M. Brown, PhD, MBA, JD is a consultant and advisor to a series of biotech and life sciences companies. Dr. Brown is a seasoned attorney in intellectual property with deep experience in healthcare-related matters. He is licensed to practice law in several states and is a registered patent attorney. His consulting experience includes intellectual property portfolio management, clinical trial contracts, and patent/business development matters. He holds a PhD from the University of Southampton, England, an MBA from Fairleigh Dickinson University, and a JD from New York Law School. Dr. Brown conducted postdoctoral research at Harvard, Johnson & Johnson, NIH, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Miguel A. Grimaldo, MEng Miguel A. Grimaldo, MEng is an Assistant Professor for the Department of Pathology, Director of Institutional Biocontainment Resources at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) and the Director of the Biocontainment Engineering Division for the Galveston National Laboratory. His responsibilities include the review of all design, construction, commissioning and operation of High and Maximum containment laboratories as well as to ensure regulatory compliance and to conduct ongoing evaluation and recertification on all critical containment features, equipment and operations for Biosafety Level 3 (BSL‐3), Animal Biosafety Level 3 (ABSL3) and Biosafety Level 4 (BSL4) laboratory facilities at UTMB. He is also a member of the UTMB Institutional Biosafety Committee. He has served as Committee Member for development of the ANSI Z9.14‐2014 Standard ‐ Testing and Performance‐Verification Methodologies for Ventilation Systems for Biosafety Level 3 (BSL‐3) and Animal Biosafety Level 3 (ABSL‐3) facilities as well as for the 2016 Edition of the National Institute of Health (NIH) ‐ Design Requirements Manual (DRM) for Biomedical Laboratories and Animal Research Facilities. Miguel routinely serves as Biocontainment Advisor for containment laboratories nationally and internationally on design, construction and operations and also routinely contributes to a technical column in the American Biological Safety Association (ABSA) journal, Applied Biosafety entitled, “Containment Talk”. Mr. Grimaldo obtained his Masters of Engineering from the University of Louisville and Bachelor of Science degrees in Agricultural Engineering and Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University. Dr. Helene Paxton, MS, MT(ASCP), PhD, CIC Dr. Helene Paxton, MS, MT(ASCP), PhD, CIC, is an Infection Preventionist, owner of Bio Guidance, LLC, adjunct biology professor at Rowan University and Director of Infection Prevention at Saint Francis Healthcare. She is Infection Control Certified (CIC), board certified as an International Medical Laboratory Scientist and holds a PhD in Epidemiology. Dr. Paxton has 40 plus years’ experience in medical devices and infectious disease consulting. Dr. Paxton obtained her PhD from Kennedy Western University and her MS from Bowling Green State University. Scientific Advisory Board Provisions and criteria have been set in the company's bylaws and scientific advisory board charter. TOMI’s scientific advisory board will always observe in the letter and spirit the duties, rights and role as a member of the company's board as stipulated in the relevant listing standards. About TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. TOMI™ Environmental Solutions, Inc. (OTCQX:TOMZ) is a global bacteria decontamination and infectious disease control company, providing eco-friendly environmental solutions for indoor surface disinfection through manufacturing, sales and licensing of its premier platform of Hydrogen Peroxide based product that uses Binary Ionization Technology® (BIT™) , a state of the art technology for the production of its Activated Ionized Hydrogen Peroxide mist represented by the TOMI™ SteraMist™ brand. TOMI’s products are designed to service a broad spectrum of commercial structures including hospitals and medical facilities, cruise ships, office buildings, hotel and motel rooms, schools, restaurants, for non-food safety in meat and produce processing facilities, military barracks, and athletic facilities. TOMI’s products and services have also been used in single-family homes and multi-unit residences. TOMI also develops training programs and application protocols for its clients and is a member in good standing with The American Biological Safety Association, The American Association of Tissue Banks, Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, The Restoration Industry Association, Indoor Air Quality Association, and The International Ozone Association. For additional product information, visit www.tomimist.com or contact us at info@tomimist.com. Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 Certain written and oral statements made by us may constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Reform Act”). Forward-looking statements are identified by such words and phrases as “we expect,” “expected to,” “estimates,” “estimated,” “current outlook,” “we look forward to,” “would equate to,” “projects,” “projections,” “projected to be,” “anticipates,” “anticipated,” “we believe,” “could be,” and other similar phrases. All statements addressing operating performance, events, or developments that we expect or anticipate will occur in the future, including statements relating to revenue growth, earnings, earnings-per-share growth, or similar projections, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Reform Act. They are forward-looking, and they should be evaluated in light of important risk factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from our anticipated results. The information provided in this document is based upon the facts and circumstances known at this time. We undertake no obligation to update these forward-looking statements after the date of this release.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumors and, up until now, drugs available to fight it are only generic chemotherapy treatments. The protein Nupr1 belongs to the special class of “intrinsically disordered proteins” and its involvement in this pathology has been demonstrated since the '90s by a French team of the National Institute of Health in Marseille. The aim of discovering a molecule capable to inhibit this protein has been now reached through a study performed by the Institute of Nanotechnology of the National Research Council of Italy (Cnr-Nanotec), unit of Rende (Cosenza), in collaboration with several research units in Spain, including the universities of Elche and Zaragoza, and the center for hepato-digestive diseases of Madrid, in cooperation with the Cancer Center of Marseille. "The research has been performed starting from the screening of more than 1000 drugs already approved for various therapeutic indications," explains Bruno Rizzuti of Cnr-Nanotec in Rende. "The combined use of experimental techniques and computer simulations has allowed us to identify some of those drugs capable to interact with the protein Nupr1. 'In vitro' experiments have afterwards shown that the selected compounds were able to lower the vitality of tumor cells, reduce the ability of migration, and completely suppress the possibility of colony formation. The most effective compound has been tested 'in vivo' on human pancreatic cancer cells transplanted on mice, and proved to be able to completely arrest the development of the disease. The molecule at issue — known as trifluoperazine, and used until now only for its anti-psychotic action — has demonstrated an antitumor efficacy even higher than the most powerful chemotherapy treatments available so far. Furthermore, this study shows that this new molecule constitutes not only an alternative to such previously known drugs, but it can be combined with them to increase the overall therapeutic effect.” "According to one of the dogmas of classical biology," he adds, "the conformation of a protein should be unique and well defined to allow each of these 'molecular machines' to carry out a specific function. Disordered proteins overturn the validity of this principle and, due to their flexible structure, are able to perform multiple functions of cell communication and regulation. However, the absence of well-defined structural elements appeared to be an insurmountable obstacle to proceed to a rational design of selective drugs to hinder their action."

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