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Balam-Ortiz E.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Esquivel-Villarreal A.,Central North Hospital | Alfaro-Ruiz L.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Carrillo K.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | And 5 more authors.
American Journal of the Medical Sciences | Year: 2011

The plasmatic angiotensinogen (AGT) level has been associated with essential hypertension. Linkage analysis has found a relationship between the AGT gene locus and hypertension in the Mexican-American population, but studies have failed to identify genetic variants associated with hypertension or plasma AGT levels. This study analyzes the relationship between polymorphisms in the AGT gene and plasmatic AGT levels in Mexican population. Methods: Nine polymorphisms in AGT gene were genotyped, and plasma AGT level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Differences in AGT plasma levels were associated with 2 polymorphisms: T-20G, TT = 25.3 ± 8.3 versus TG + GG = 21.6 ± 8.8 μg/mL; P = 0.008 and C3389T (T174M), CC = 25.8 ± 9.9 versus TC + TT = 20.5 ± 5.4 μg/mL; P = 0.0002. Haplotype 2 was associated with low plasma AGT (-5.1 μg/mL [95% confidence interval: -8.6 to -1.6], P = 0.004) and Haplotype 8 was associated with high plasma AGT (6.5 μg/mL [95% confidence interval: 2.5 to 10.6], P = 0.001). This association remained after adjustment for covariates. A Likelihood Ratio Test for haplotype-phenotype association adjusted for covariates resulted in χ = 38.9, P = 0.0005. The total effect of the haplotypes on plasma AGT level variance was 19.5%. No association was identified between haplotypes and quantitative traits of blood pressure. Conclusions: Two polymorphisms (T-20G and C3389T) and 2 haplotypes (H2 and H8) showed an association with plasma AGT levels in Mexican population. Copyright © by the Southern Society for Clinical Investigation.


Balam-Ortiz E.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Balam-Ortiz E.,PEMEX | Esquivel-Villarreal A.,PEMEX | Huerta-Hernandez D.,SEDENA Central Military Hospital | And 13 more authors.
Hypertension | Year: 2012

The angiotensinogen gene locus has been associated with essential hypertension in most populations analyzed to date. Increased plasma angiotensinogen levels have been proposed as an underlying cause of essential hypertension in whites; however, differences in the genetic regulation of plasma angiotensinogen levels have also been reported for other populations. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with plasma angiotensinogen levels and the risk of essential hypertension in the Mexican population. We genotyped 9 angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in 706 individuals. Four polymorphisms, A-6, C4072, C6309, and G12775, were associated with increased risk, and the strongest association was found for the C6309 allele (χ2=23.9; P=0.0000009), which resulted in an odds ratio of 3.0 (95% CI: 1.8-4.9; P=0.000006) in the recessive model. Two polymorphisms, A-20C (P=0.003) and C3389T (P=0.0001), were associated with increased plasma angiotensinogen levels but did not show association with essential hypertension. The haplotypes H1 (χ2=8.1; P=0.004) and H5 (χ2=5.1; P=0.02) were associated with essential hypertension. Using phylogenetic analysis, we found that haplotypes 1 and 5 are the human ancestral haplotypes. Our results suggest that the positive association between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with essential hypertension is not simply explained by an increase in plasma angiotensinogen concentration. Complex interactions between risk alleles suggest that these haplotypes act as "superalleles." © 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.


PubMed | National Autonomous University of Mexico, Autonomous University of Mexico City, National Institute of Medical science and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran INCMNSZ and National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pathogens and disease | Year: 2016

Epidemiological information and animal models have shown various Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypes ranging from hyper- to hypovirulent forms. Recent genomic and proteomic studies suggest that the outcome of infection depends on the M. tuberculosis fitness, which is a direct consequence of its phenotype. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms used by mycobacteria to survive, replicate and persist during infection. The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive proteomic analysis of culture filtrate from hypo- (CPT23) and hypervirulent (CPT31) M. tuberculosis isolates. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis we observed that 70 proteins were unique, or more abundant in culture filtrate of CPT31, and 15 of these were identified by mass spectrometry. Our analysis of protein expression showed that most of the proteins identified are involved in lipid metabolism (FadA3, FbpB and EchA3), detoxification and adaptation (GroEL2, SodB and HspX) and cell wall processes (LprA, Tig and EsxB). These results suggest that overrepresented proteins in M. tuberculosis CPT31 secretome could facilitate mycobacterial infection and persistence.


Tovar H.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Garcia-Herrera R.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Espinal-Enriquez J.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Espinal-Enriquez J.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 2 more authors.
Computational Biology and Chemistry | Year: 2015

Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


de Anda-Jauregui G.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Mejia-Pedroza R.A.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Espinal-Enriquez J.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Espinal-Enriquez J.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 2 more authors.
Computational Biology and Chemistry | Year: 2015

Steroid hormones are involved on cell growth, development and differentiation. Such effects are often mediated by steroid receptors. One paradigmatic example of this coupling is the estrogen signaling pathway. Its dysregulation is involved in most tumors of the mammary gland. It is thus an important pharmacological target in breast cancer. This pathway, however, crosstalks with several other molecular pathways, a fact that may have consequences for the effectiveness of hormone modulating drug therapies, such as tamoxifen. For this work, we performed a systematic analysis of the major routes involved in crosstalk phenomena with the estrogen pathway - based on gene expression experiments (819 samples) and pathway analysis (493 samples) - for biopsy-captured tissue and contrasted in two independent datasets with in vivo and in vitro pharmacological stimulation. Our results confirm the presence of a number of crosstalk events across the estrogen signaling pathway with others that are dysregulated in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These may be involved in proliferation, invasiveness and apoptosis-evasion in patients. The results presented may open the way to new designs of adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies for breast cancer treatment. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Jimenez-Lopez S.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Mancera-Martinez E.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Donayre-Torres A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Rangel C.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | And 4 more authors.
Plant and Cell Physiology | Year: 2011

Seed germination is a critical developmental period for plant propagation. Information regarding gene expression within this important period is relevant for understanding the main biochemical processes required for successful germination, particularly in maize, one of the most important cereals in the world. The present research focuses on the global microarray analysis of differential gene expression between quiescent and germinated maize embryo stages. This analysis revealed that a large number of mRNAs stored in the quiescent embryonic axes (QEAs) were differentially regulated during germination in the 24 h germinated embryonic axes (GEAs). These genes belong to 14 different functional categories and most of them correspond to metabolic processes, followed by transport, transcription and translation. Interestingly, the expression of mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins [(r)-proteins], required for new ribosome formation during this fast-growing period, remains mostly unchanged throughout the germination process, suggesting that these genes are not regulated at the transcriptional level during this developmental period. To investigate this issue further, comparative microarray analyses on polysomal mRNAs from growth-stimulated and non-stimulated GEAs were performed. The results revealed that (r)-protein mRNAs accumulate to high levels in polysomes of the growth-stimulated tissues, indicating a translational control mechanism to account for the rapid (r)-protein synthesis observed within this period. Bioinformatic analysis of (r)-protein mRNAs showed that 5′ TOP (tract of pyrimidines)-like sequences are present only in the 5′-untranslated region set of up-regulated (r)-protein mRNAs. This overall approach to the germination process allows an in-depth view of molecular changes, enabling a broader understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that occur during this process. © 2011 The Author.


Hernandez-Lemus E.,National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN | Hernandez-Lemus E.,National Autonomous University of Mexico
Journal of Physics: Conference Series | Year: 2013

Recent years have witnessed the development of new quantitative approaches and theoretical tenets in the biological sciences. The advent of high throughput experiments in genomics, proteomics and electrophysiology (to cite just a few examples) have provided the researchers with unprecedented amounts of data to be analyzed. Large datasets, however can not provide the means to achieve a complete understanding of the underlying biological phenomena, unless they are supplied with a solid theoretical framework and with proper analytical tools. It is now widely accepted that by using and extending some of the paradigmatic principles of what has been called complex systems theory, some degree of advance in this direction can be attained. We will be presenting ways in which by using data integration techniques (linear, non-linear, combinatorial, graphical), multidimensional-multilevel descriptions (multifractal modeling, dimensionality reduction, computational learning), as well as an approach based in systems theory (interaction maps, probabilistic graphical models, non-equilibrium physics) have allowed us to better understand some problems in the interface of Statistical Physics and Computational Biology.


PubMed | National Autonomous University of Mexico and National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN
Type: | Journal: Computational biology and chemistry | Year: 2015

Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology.


PubMed | National Autonomous University of Mexico and National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN
Type: | Journal: Computational biology and chemistry | Year: 2015

Steroid hormones are involved on cell growth, development and differentiation. Such effects are often mediated by steroid receptors. One paradigmatic example of this coupling is the estrogen signaling pathway. Its dysregulation is involved in most tumors of the mammary gland. It is thus an important pharmacological target in breast cancer. This pathway, however, crosstalks with several other molecular pathways, a fact that may have consequences for the effectiveness of hormone modulating drug therapies, such as tamoxifen. For this work, we performed a systematic analysis of the major routes involved in crosstalk phenomena with the estrogen pathway - based on gene expression experiments (819 samples) and pathway analysis (493 samples) - for biopsy-captured tissue and contrasted in two independent datasets with in vivo and in vitro pharmacological stimulation. Our results confirm the presence of a number of crosstalk events across the estrogen signaling pathway with others that are dysregulated in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These may be involved in proliferation, invasiveness and apoptosis-evasion in patients. The results presented may open the way to new designs of adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies for breast cancer treatment.


PubMed | National Institute of Genomic Medicine INMEGEN
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) | Year: 2012

The angiotensinogen gene locus has been associated with essential hypertension in most populations analyzed to date. Increased plasma angiotensinogen levels have been proposed as an underlying cause of essential hypertension in whites; however, differences in the genetic regulation of plasma angiotensinogen levels have also been reported for other populations. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with plasma angiotensinogen levels and the risk of essential hypertension in the Mexican population. We genotyped 9 angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in 706 individuals. Four polymorphisms, A-6, C4072, C6309, and G12775, were associated with increased risk, and the strongest association was found for the C6309 allele ((2)=23.9; P=0.0000009), which resulted in an odds ratio of 3.0 (95% CI: 1.8-4.9; P=0.000006) in the recessive model. Two polymorphisms, A-20C (P=0.003) and C3389T (P=0.0001), were associated with increased plasma angiotensinogen levels but did not show association with essential hypertension. The haplotypes H1 ((2)=8.1; P=0.004) and H5 ((2)=5.1; P=0.02) were associated with essential hypertension. Using phylogenetic analysis, we found that haplotypes 1 and 5 are the human ancestral haplotypes. Our results suggest that the positive association between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with essential hypertension is not simply explained by an increase in plasma angiotensinogen concentration. Complex interactions between risk alleles suggest that these haplotypes act as superalleles.

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