National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry

South Korea

National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry

South Korea
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Ahn B.-H.,National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry | Kim J.-H.,Seoul National University | Oh S.,Seoul National University | Choi S.S.,National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry | And 2 more authors.
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry | Year: 2012

Objective: This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with parricide in patients with schizophrenia who committed homicide. Method: Among patients with schizophrenia who were in the National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry between November and December 2007, 88 patients who committed homicides were enrolled; 59 had committed parricide, and 29 had killed strangers. Medical charts, written expert opinions, written records of police or prosecutors, and court decisions were reviewed. Direct interviews with patients were also conducted. Results: Significant factors associated with parricide among homicidal patients with schizophrenia were living with the victim, female sex of the victim, and offense-provoking events including scolding, threatening forced hospitalisation, and forcing medication on the patient before the homicide. Capgras syndrome was present at a significantly higher rate in the parricide group than in the stranger group. Drug compliance at the time of the offence was low in both groups. Conclusions: Untreated psychotic symptoms such as Capgras syndrome, living with elderly parents, especially mothers, and conflicts caused by victims' scolding, threatening forced hospitalisation, and forcing medication on the patients are associated with parricide among homicide offenders with schizophrenia.


Kim J.-H.,Seoul National University | Choi S.S.,National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry | Rhee M.S.,National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry | Kim S.B.,National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Forensic Sciences | Year: 2012

This study assessed the effect of a 10-week cognitive behavior treatment program in 30 mentally ill sex offenders. The effect of the program was evaluated using the Interpersonal Responsiveness Index (IRI), UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLALS), Coping Using Sex Inventory (CUSI), and Rape Myth Acceptance Scale (RMAS). Data were analyzed using the paired t-test. The ability of sex offenders to cope with sexual acts when they faced stressful situations and to accept the rape myth was significantly improved on CUSI (t = 2.09, p = 0.04) and RMAS (t = 5.45, p < 0.001). Feelings of isolation and the ability to empathize based on IRI (t = 0.62, p = 0.54) and UCLALS (t = 0.88, p = 0.38) were not significantly improved. To prevent recidivism, treatment for mentally ill sex offenders should focus on changes in their cognitive and emotional characteristics in addition to their main psychiatric illness. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.


Yoon J.-H.,National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry | Kim J.-H.,Seoul National University | Choi S.S.,National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry | Lyu M.K.,National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry | And 3 more authors.
Forensic Science International | Year: 2012

Background: Non-serious offenses in manic phase have been mainly studied in patients with bipolar disorder. However, some authors reported that depressive phase is related with the violent and homicidal manifestations of bipolar disorder. Aims: We investigated the characteristics of homicide by the polarity of mood episode in patients with bipolar I disorder. Methods: Among the offenders who were sentenced to undergo treatment at the National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry from October 1987 to January 2008, a total 219 offenders whose final diagnoses were bipolar I disorder based on DSM-III-R and DSM-IV were selected. Retrospective medical chart review was performed for characteristics of mood episodes. Descriptions of offenders were supplemented by review of the written records of the police or prosecutors. Results: The general rate of total offense was higher in the manic phase than in the depressive phase (86.8% vs. 13.2%). However, the rate of homicide was higher in the depressive phase than in the manic phase. The victims of homicide were more likely to be family members of the patients in depressive phase than in manic phases (96.2% vs. 63.9%, p= 0.001). However, parricide was committed only in manic phases. Altruistic motivation of homicide was significantly higher in depressive phase (34.6% vs. 0%, p< 0.001) whereas impulsivity was the most common one in manic phases. Conclusions: The risk of offenses, particularly homicide for family members, should not be overlooked in the depressive phases of bipolar I disorder. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


PubMed | National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Forensic science international | Year: 2012

Non-serious offenses in manic phase have been mainly studied in patients with bipolar disorder. However, some authors reported that depressive phase is related with the violent and homicidal manifestations of bipolar disorder.We investigated the characteristics of homicide by the polarity of mood episode in patients with bipolar I disorder.Among the offenders who were sentenced to undergo treatment at the National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry from October 1987 to January 2008, a total 219 offenders whose final diagnoses were bipolar I disorder based on DSM-III-R and DSM-IV were selected. Retrospective medical chart review was performed for characteristics of mood episodes. Descriptions of offenders were supplemented by review of the written records of the police or prosecutors.The general rate of total offense was higher in the manic phase than in the depressive phase (86.8% vs. 13.2%). However, the rate of homicide was higher in the depressive phase than in the manic phase. The victims of homicide were more likely to be family members of the patients in depressive phase than in manic phases (96.2% vs. 63.9%, p=0.001). However, parricide was committed only in manic phases. Altruistic motivation of homicide was significantly higher in depressive phase (34.6% vs. 0%, p<0.001) whereas impulsivity was the most common one in manic phases.The risk of offenses, particularly homicide for family members, should not be overlooked in the depressive phases of bipolar I disorder.


PubMed | National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry | Year: 2012

This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with parricide in patients with schizophrenia who committed homicide.Among patients with schizophrenia who were in the National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry between November and December 2007, 88 patients who committed homicides were enrolled; 59 had committed parricide, and 29 had killed strangers. Medical charts, written expert opinions, written records of police or prosecutors, and court decisions were reviewed. Direct interviews with patients were also conducted.Significant factors associated with parricide among homicidal patients with schizophrenia were living with the victim, female sex of the victim, and offense-provoking events including scolding, threatening forced hospitalisation, and forcing medication on the patient before the homicide. Capgras syndrome was present at a significantly higher rate in the parricide group than in the stranger group. Drug compliance at the time of the offence was low in both groups.Untreated psychotic symptoms such as Capgras syndrome, living with elderly parents, especially mothers, and conflicts caused by victims scolding, threatening forced hospitalisation, and forcing medication on the patients are associated with parricide among homicide offenders with schizophrenia.

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