National Institute of Environmental Research

Incheon, South Korea

National Institute of Environmental Research

Incheon, South Korea
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Patent
National Institute Of Environmental Research | Date: 2015-09-23

The present invention relates to a real-time automatic analysis device for an organic contaminant in water, the device having: an analysis apparatus comprising a solid phase micro-extraction device and a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis device that have been traditionally used; a heating block; a sample bottle; a discharge unit; and a control unit. While using an analysis apparatus, being traditionally used, as it is, the real-time automatic analysis device for an organic contaminant in water accurately and quickly identifies a point of generation of a high-concentration organic contaminant by supplying a sample consecutively and in real time, takes follow-up measures, and easily performs a sensory analysis as well as a chemical analysis.


The present invention relates to a real-time automatic analysis method, for an organic contaminant, using a real-time SPME-GC or SPME-GC/MS analysis system, the method comprising: a sample supply step for supplying consecutively and in real time a sample to a storing portion of a sample bottle through a sample supply line formed in a real-time SPME-GC or SPME-GC/MS analysis system; and a sample analysis step, such that the sample can be supplied consecutively and in real time, and thus a point of generation of a high-concentration organic contaminant is accurately and quickly identified and follow-up measures are taken.


Receive press releases from SGS North America Inc.: By Email New State-of-the-Art Agriculture and Food Testing Laboratory Opened by SGS in South Korea On November 14, 2016, SGS opened a new dedicated state-of-the-art food testing and agricultural services laboratory in Uiwang City, near Seoul, South Korea. Rutherford, NJ, December 15, 2016 --( The new laboratory offers the full-range of testing facilities, including: · Food chemical testing – e.g. nutrition, vitamins, preservatives and sugars · Food contaminant testing – e.g. pesticide residues, heavy metals, animal drug residues, melamine, histamine, mycotoxins and PAHs · Microbiological and DNA testing – e.g. microbiological limit testing, including microorganisms identification, allergens, GMO’s, norovirus and antibiotics effectiveness The new facility will be capable of offering these tests across a broad range of food categories, including beverages, dairy, grains and cereals, pastry, meat, poultry and seafood, fruit and vegetables, herbs and spices, tea and coffee, processed, canned and frozen foods, oils and fats, bottled water, and confectionary and chocolate. Accredited to the ISO 17025 standard, the new laboratory employs 53 dedicated full-time staff members and a further 24 part-time members. ISO 17025 is the benchmark standard for technical competency, demonstrating rigorous testing standards and a meticulous laboratory management system. The facility has also been accredited as an official food laboratory by the South Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, and the National Agricultural Products Quality Management Service has authorized it as an agricultural product testing laboratory. Furthermore, the National Institute of Environmental Research has designated the facility a norovirus testing laboratory. In addition to food and agricultural testing, the facility also offers comprehensive auditing services, including supplier and hygiene audits, training, Standard Operating Procedures development, food label review services and inspection services for agricultural, food and fishery products. Conveniently located in Uiwang City, close to Seoul, SGS’s new food and agricultural testing laboratory has become the benchmark for testing services in South Korea; offering expert analysis, testing, auditing, training and inspection services to the country’s agricultural and food sectors. For further information contact: Stephen Min Food Team Manager Agriculture, Food & Life food@sgs.com Tel: (+82) 31 460 8121 About SGS SGS is the world’s leading inspection, verification, testing and certification company. SGS is recognized as the global benchmark for quality and integrity. With more than 85,000 employees, SGS operates a network of over 1,800 offices and laboratories around the world. Rutherford, NJ, December 15, 2016 --( PR.com )-- SGS has established a new 2,340 m2 state-of-the-art laboratory in Uiwang City, near Seoul, South Korea. Opened on November 14, 2016, the new laboratory creates a new benchmark standard for food testing and agricultural services in Korea and continues the growth SGS has already achieved in the Korea market.The new laboratory offers the full-range of testing facilities, including:· Food chemical testing – e.g. nutrition, vitamins, preservatives and sugars· Food contaminant testing – e.g. pesticide residues, heavy metals, animal drug residues, melamine, histamine, mycotoxins and PAHs· Microbiological and DNA testing – e.g. microbiological limit testing, including microorganisms identification, allergens, GMO’s, norovirus and antibiotics effectivenessThe new facility will be capable of offering these tests across a broad range of food categories, including beverages, dairy, grains and cereals, pastry, meat, poultry and seafood, fruit and vegetables, herbs and spices, tea and coffee, processed, canned and frozen foods, oils and fats, bottled water, and confectionary and chocolate.Accredited to the ISO 17025 standard, the new laboratory employs 53 dedicated full-time staff members and a further 24 part-time members. ISO 17025 is the benchmark standard for technical competency, demonstrating rigorous testing standards and a meticulous laboratory management system.The facility has also been accredited as an official food laboratory by the South Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, and the National Agricultural Products Quality Management Service has authorized it as an agricultural product testing laboratory. Furthermore, the National Institute of Environmental Research has designated the facility a norovirus testing laboratory.In addition to food and agricultural testing, the facility also offers comprehensive auditing services, including supplier and hygiene audits, training, Standard Operating Procedures development, food label review services and inspection services for agricultural, food and fishery products.Conveniently located in Uiwang City, close to Seoul, SGS’s new food and agricultural testing laboratory has become the benchmark for testing services in South Korea; offering expert analysis, testing, auditing, training and inspection services to the country’s agricultural and food sectors.For further information contact:Stephen MinFood Team ManagerAgriculture, Food & Lifefood@sgs.comTel: (+82) 31 460 8121About SGSSGS is the world’s leading inspection, verification, testing and certification company. SGS is recognized as the global benchmark for quality and integrity. With more than 85,000 employees, SGS operates a network of over 1,800 offices and laboratories around the world. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SGS North America Inc.


Park J.S.,National Health Research Institute | Shin S.K.,National Institute of Environmental Research | Kim W.I.,National Health Research Institute | Kim B.H.,Ministry of Environment
Atmospheric Environment | Year: 2011

The nationwide monitoring program was established in 2008 to monitor of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Korea. Under this program, it was observed air concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) at 37 sites from January to October of 2008, to determine the residue levels and identify possible sources in Korea atmosphere. Samples of OCPs including HCB, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDD, trans-chlordane, cis-chlordane, trans-nonachlor, cis-nonachlor, oxychlordane, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide were collected with high volume air sampler and analyzed by HRGC/HRMS. The concentrations were in the range of 41.2-344.3pgm-3 for HCB, ND-47.55pgm-3 for DDTs (sum of p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDD), ND-38.97pgm-3 for chlordanes (sum of trans-chlordane, cis-chlordane, trans-nonachlor, cis-nonachlor, oxychlordane), ND-9.19pgm-3 for heptachlors (sum of heptachlor and heptachlor epoxide) and ND-4.32pgm-3 for dieldrin. The predominant compound in air was HCB. However, HCB itself has not ever been registered and used as a pesticide in Korea. The elevated concentration of HCB in Korea might be contributed to geographical location and long range transport. For DDTs, it was found that no more fresh input occurred recently and technical type DDTs was prevailing in Korea. Higher concentration of chlordane was observed in winter, which was contributed to the fresh input technical chlordane and long range transport. Relatively lower levels of heptachlor and dieldrin despite much more consumption than other pesticides were resulted from shorter half-lives in environment. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Kim S.-K.,Incheon National University | Yoon J.,National Institute of Environmental Research
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2014

Despite the first comprehensive reviewing on POPs status in Korea, a previous review chapter (Departments in Environmental Science, Volume 7, Chapter 2) could not discuss and evaluate the temporal trends and the effect of the efforts and policies invested in POPs control and management, since most data were based on individual research results of academic groups in which POPs could not be systematically monitored in terms of time and space. Recently, we have collected monitoring data long enough in time (over 10. years) and wide enough in space (covering various land-use patterns and the Korean peninsula), which were produced at national monitoring stations under the governmental programs. This study aimed to elucidate the temporal trends of POPs emissions, concentrations in multiple compartments (air, water, soil, sediment, organisms, and marine products), and human exposure. The chronological data available for all the subjects investigated were present only for PCDDs/DFs and coPCBs. Their emission reduction with half-lives of ~. 2. years was followed by contemporaneous decrease of contamination levels in inland compartments, while a considerably slow or slight reduction occurred in human exposure and its related compartments (fishes and shellfishes as foodstuffs consumed, and marine compartments). The findings prove that a lag-time is present for the efforts of emission reduction to be so much effective as to be reflected directly in human exposure, and such a lag-time can be related with the fates connecting inland and marine environments. PCBs showed faster reduction in human exposure than dioxin-like compounds. As for other POPs, chronological trends and half-lives could not be determined owing to low detection frequencies of PCBs and OCPs in environmental compartments, the absence of monitoring data for OCPs in human exposure, and data limitation for emerging POPs present in recent a few years. Monitoring strategies are also recommended based on this meta-analysis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Sim W.-J.,Pusan National University | Lee J.-W.,Pusan National University | Lee E.-S.,Pusan National University | Shin S.-K.,National Institute of Environmental Research | And 2 more authors.
Chemosphere | Year: 2011

Twenty-four pharmaceuticals were measured in wastewater from 12 municipal wastewater treatment plants (M-WWTPs), four livestock WWTPs (L-WWTPs), four hospital WWTPs (H-WWTPs) and four pharmaceutical manufacture WWTPs (P-WWTPs). The total concentration of pharmaceuticals in the influent samples was highest in the L-WWTPs followed by the P-WWTPs, H-WWTPs and M-WWTPs. The effluents had different patterns of pharmaceuticals than their corresponding influents because of the different fate of each compound in the WWTPs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were the most dominant in the influents from the M-WWTPs and P-WWTPs, while antibiotics were dominantly detected in the L-WWTP. In the H-WWTP influents, NSAIDs, caffeine and carbamazepine were dominant. In the P-WWTPs, the distribution of pharmaceuticals in the effluents varied with sampling sites and periods. The M-WWTP influents had the highest daily loads, while the effluents showed somewhat similar levels in all source types. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Lee J.E.,National Institute of Environmental Research | Lee J.E.,Korea University | Ko G.,Korea University
Water Research | Year: 2013

Germicidal ultraviolet, such as 254-nm UV-C, is a common method of disinfection of pathogenic enteric viruses. However, the disinfection efficacies of UV-A or -B in terms of inactivating waterborne viruses such as norovirus have not been characterized. We evaluated the inactivation kinetics of MS2 bacteriophage and murine norovirus (MNV), a surrogate of human norovirus (NoV), by UV-A and -B. In addition to UV disinfection, we further investigated whether the presence of TiO2 could enhance the virus inactivation kinetics of UV-A and -B. Both MS2 and MNV were highly resistant to UV-A. However, the addition of TiO2 enhanced the efficacy of UV-A for inactivating these viruses. UV-A dose of 1379mJ/cm2 resulted in a 4 log10 reduction. In comparison, UV-B alone effectively inactivated both MS2 and MNV, as evidenced by the 4 log10 reduction by 367mJ/cm2 of UV-B. The addition of TiO2 increased the inactivation of MS2; however, it did not significantly increase the efficacy of UV-B disinfection for inactivating MNV. When these treatments were applied to field water such as groundwater, the results were generally consistent with the laboratory findings. Our results clearly indicated that UV-B is useful for the disinfection of waterborne norovirus. However, MNV was quite resistant to UV-A, and UV-A effectively inactivated the tested viruses only when used in combination with TiO2. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


This study describes a hydrometallurgical process to investigate the recovery of lithium from seawater using devised total process including an adsorption process with manganese oxide adsorbent and a precipitation process. First, precipitation experiments on Ca(OH)2, Mg(OH)2, and Mn(OH)2 from CaCl2, MgCl2, and MgCl2 in NaOH-H2O solutions were carried out under various conditions of reaction temperature (25-90 °C), NaOH concentration (7-14 pH), and initial amount of CaCl2, MgCl2, and MnCl2 (10 and 100 mmol/dm3). The obtained results showed that there was a need to divide the precipitation process into two steps based on the precipitation characteristics of the target elements in NaOH (or HCl)-H2O solutions. These two steps consist of a first stage with precipitation of Ca(OH)2, Mg(OH)2, and Mn(OH)2 by NaOH and a second stage with Li2CO3 recovery by neutralization using HCl, carbonation using Na2CO3, and concentration using evaporation. Chemical modeling with OLI-Systems® software was used to interpret the precipitation behavior of target elements in the first and second stages; it was compared with available experimental data and good agreement was found. On the basis of the above data, it was possible to separate Ca, Mg, and Mn under pH values ranging from 11.5 to 12.5 in the first stage after the process of seawater adsorption with manganese oxide adsorbent and to recover crystalline Li2CO3 with high purity (over 99%) carbonated by Na2CO3 in the second stage, involving neutralization by adjusting the pH value in the range of 6-8 and evaporation at 100°C to obtain the product with high yield. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Jung J.H.,Korea Institute of Science and Technology | Lee J.E.,National Institute of Environmental Research | Bae G.-N.,Korea Institute of Science and Technology
Journal of Aerosol Science | Year: 2013

Previously, we demonstrated that electrospraying, driven by high-intensity electric fields, can be used to generate stable antimicrobial nanoparticles continuously from ethanolic extracts of natural plant products. In this study, we evaluated the performance of antimicrobial air filters made by these electrosprayed natural-product nanoparticles. As a natural antimicrobial suspension, an ethanolic extract of Sophora flavescens Ait. was sprayed in steady cone-jet mode using our specially designed electrospray system (Jung et al., 2011b). Natural-product nanoparticles with a bimodal size distribution were electrosprayed and deposited continuously onto the surfaces of air filters at various concentrations. The physical (filtration efficiency, pressure drop, and fiber morphology) and biological (antimicrobial efficacy against airborne Staphylococcus epidermidis) characteristics were evaluated. Consequently, although the filter pressure drop increased with the amount of nanoparticles on the filter, the antimicrobial activity was enhanced. Compared with the conventional nebulization process, the filters generated by electrospraying S. flavescens natural-product nanoparticles resulted in more effective removal of S. epidermidis bioaerosols. These results will facilitate the implementation of this new technology to control air quality and protect against hazardous airborne microorganisms. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Rhee S.-W.,Kyonggi University | Choi H.-H.,National Institute of Environmental Research | Park H.-S.,Kyonggi University
Waste Management | Year: 2014

In order to recycle the linear type of SFL (spent fluorescent lamp), mercury from SFL should be controlled to prevent leaking into the environment. For mercury emission from SFL, mercury concentration is estimated in the parts of SFL such as glass tube, phosphor powder, and base cap using the end-cutting unit. It is also evaluated mercury emission in the effluent gas in the end-cutting unit with changing flow rate. From the results of mercury emission from SFLs, phosphor powder has greater than 80% of mercury amount in SFL and about 15% of mercury amount contained in glass tube. The initial mercury concentration in vapor phase is almost decreased linearly with increasing airflow rate from 0.7. L/min to 1.3. L/min. It is desirable that airflow rate should be high until the concentration of mercury vapor will be stable because the stabilized concentration becomes to be low and the stabilized time goes to be short as increased airflow rate. From KET and TCLP results, finally, phosphor powder should be managed as a hazardous waste but base-cap and glass are not classified as hazardous wastes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

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