National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases NIAMS

Bethesda, MD, United States

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases NIAMS

Bethesda, MD, United States
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O'Mara A.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Rowland J.H.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Greenwell T.N.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Wiggs C.L.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | And 34 more authors.
American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Year: 2017

One in five Americans experiences disability that affects their daily function because of impairments in mobility, cognitive function, sensory impairment, or communication impairment. The need for rehabilitation strategies to optimize function and reduce disability is a clear priority for research to address this public health challenge. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a Research Plan on Rehabilitation that provides a set of priorities to guide the field over the next 5 years. The plan was developed with input from multiple Institutes and Centers within the NIH, the National Advisory Board for Medical Rehabilitation Research, and the public. This article provides an overview of the need for this research plan, an outline of its development, and a listing of six priority areas for research. The NIH is committed to working with all stakeholder communities engaged in rehabilitation research to track progress made on these priorities and to work to advance the science of medical rehabilitation. © Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Park H.,National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases NIAMS | Park H.,U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases | Bourla A.B.,National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases NIAMS | Kastner D.L.,National Human Genome Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Nature Reviews Immunology | Year: 2012

Autoinflammatory diseases are characterized by seemingly unprovoked pathological activation of the innate immune system in the absence of autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells. Discovery of the causative mutations underlying several monogenic autoinflammatory diseases has identified key regulators of innate immune responses. Recent studies have highlighted the role of misfolding, oligomerization and abnormal trafficking of pathogenic mutant proteins in triggering autoinflammation, and suggest that more common rheumatic diseases may have an autoinflammatory component. This coincides with recent discoveries of new links between endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory signalling pathways, which support the emerging view that autoinflammatory diseases may be due to pathological dysregulation of stress-sensing pathways that normally function in host defence. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


O'Mara A.,NCI Inc | Rowland J.H.,NCI Inc | Greenwell T.N.,National Eye Institute NEI | Wiggs C.L.,National Eye Institute NEI | And 33 more authors.
Physical therapy | Year: 2017

One in five Americans experiences disability that affects their daily function because of impairments in mobility, cognitive function, sensory impairment, or communication impairment. The need for rehabilitation strategies to optimize function and reduce disability is a clear priority for research to address this public health challenge. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a Research Plan on Rehabilitation that provides a set of priorities to guide the field over the next 5 years. The plan was developed with input from multiple Institutes and Centers within the NIH, the National Advisory Board for Medical Rehabilitation Research, and the public. This article provides an overview of the need for this research plan, an outline of its development, and a listing of six priority areas for research. The NIH is committed to working with all stakeholder communities engaged in rehabilitation research to track progress made on these priorities and to work to advance the science of medical rehabilitation.This article is being published almost simultaneously in the following six journals: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Physical Therapy, and Rehabilitation Psychology. Citation information is as follows: NIH Medical Rehabilitation Coordinating Committee. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2017;97(4):404-407. Copyright © Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. 2017.


O'Mara A.,National Cancer Institute NCI | Rowland J.H.,National Cancer Institute NCI | Greenwell T.N.,National Eye Institute NEI | Wiggs C.L.,National Eye Institute NEI | And 33 more authors.
American Journal of Occupational Therapy | Year: 2017

One in 5 Americans experiences disability that affects daily function because of impairments in mobility, impairments in cognitive function, sensory impairment, or communication impairment. The need for rehabilitation strategies to optimize function and reduce disability is a clear priority for research to address this public health challenge. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a Research Plan on Rehabilitation that provides a set of priorities to guide the field over the next 5 years. The plan was developed with input from multiple institutes and centers within the NIH, the National Advisory Board for Medical Rehabilitation Research, and the public. This article provides an overview of the need for this research plan, an outline of its development, and a listing of six priority areas for research. © 2017 by The Author(s).

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