Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Toyoshima H.,Health Care Center | Otsuka R.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Hashimoto S.,Fujita Health University Hospital | Tamakoshi K.,Nagoya University | And 2 more authors.
Circulation Journal | Year: 2014

Background: Chronic mental stress has been reported to be directly or inversely proportional to blood pressure (BP). To explain this inconsistent relationship, we assumed effect-modification by body mass index (BMI). Methods and Results: We examined 1,673 Japanese male local government employees who were not taking antihypertensive drugs or had no history of cardiovascular disease. BP and BMI were recorded at yearly health checkups. Exposure to mental stress, smoking, drinking, exercising, and salty taste were checked by questionnaire in 1997 and 2002. The main effect and interaction of stress and BMI on the averages and changes of resting systolic and diastolic BPs over the 5 years were assessed by a general linear model by adjusting for confounders. Obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) was significantly related with higher average systolic and diastolic BPs (P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively), whereas mental stress was not, showing a significantly different relationship dependent on BMI (P for interaction =0.002, 0.004): a significant and directly proportional association with systolic and diastolic BPs (P=0.001, 0.001) in the obese, but borderline significant and inversely proportional association (P=0.07, 0.08) in the lean. Only BMI was significantly related to the degree of BP change. Conclusions: Whereas BMI was proportionally associated with BP, BMI was a modifier which, depending on its level, inverted the direction of the association between chronic mental stress and resting BP. Source


Otsuka R.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Tange C.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Nishita Y.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Kato Y.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2014

Background/Objectives:To clarify the association of serum docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels with cognitive decline over 10 years.Subjects/Methods:This study was part of the National Institute for Longevity Sciences - Longitudinal Study of Aging, and was conducted with 232 male and 198 female Japanese community-dwelling subjects aged 60-79 years in the second wave (2000-2002). Cognitive function was assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in both the second and seventh (2010-2012) waves. Fasting venous blood samples were collected in the morning, and serum DHA and EPA levels were measured. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed among participants with an MMSE score ≥24 in the second wave (n=430) to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for MMSE score ≤23 or MMSE score decline ≥4 10 years later. These estimates were based on baseline tertiles of serum DHA or EPA levels, and controlled for age, sex, education, MMSE score at baseline, alcohol consumption, current smoking, body mass index and disease history.Results:Fifteen (3.5%) subjects whose MMSE score was ≤23 and 36 (8.3%) subjects whose MMSE score declined to ≥4 showed cognitive decline. Multivariate-adjusted OR (95% CI) for the lowest through highest tertiles of serum DHA to MMSE score ≤23 or decline≥4 were 1.00 (reference), 0.11 (0.02-0.58) and 0.17 (0.04-0.74), or 1.00 (reference), 0.22 (0.08-0.61) and 0.31 (0.12-0.75), respectively (P for trend=0.01 or 0.04). Serum EPA was not associated with cognitive decline.Conclusions:The study gives some indication that a moderately high level of serum DHA might prevent cognitive decline among community-dwelling elderly Japanese individuals. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Source


Otsuka R.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Kato Y.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Imai T.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Imai T.,Doshisha Womens College of Liberal Arts | And 4 more authors.
Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids | Year: 2015

Cross-sectional studies have shown age-related increases in blood docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid and decreases in arachidonic acid. We describe serum docosahexaenoic, eicosapentaenoic, and arachidonic acid concentrations over 13 years (1997-2012) across four study waves and serum fatty acid composition over 4 years (2006-2012) between two study waves according to age groups by sex in the same subjects. We included 443 men and 435 women aged 40-79 years at baseline. Serum arachidonic acid concentrations increased in all sex and age groups over 13 years, and eicosapentaenoic or docosahexaenoic acid concentrations increased in males and females who were younger and middle-aged at baseline. Only serum arachidonic acid composition increased over 4 years in men and women who were 40-69 years at baseline, even after adjustment for arachidonic acid intake. These findings suggest a secular increase trend in serum arachidonic acid levels over 13 years among randomly selected community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly Japanese. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Nakamoto M.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Otsuka R.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Yuki A.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Yuki A.,Kochi University | And 9 more authors.
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics | Year: 2015

Objective: This study assessed whether physical function can indicate a risk of decline in higher-level functional capacity. Methods: Data were derived from the National Institute for Longevity Sciences-Longitudinal Study of Aging. Subjects comprised 466 men and 495 women aged 40-79 years at baseline (1997-2000), whose total score for the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC) at baseline was ≥11 and who participated in the follow-up survey. Baseline physical function examination included grip strength, comfortable gait speed, and sway area with eyes open. A decline in higher-level functional capacity was defined as a ≥2-point decrease in the TMIG-IC score after 14 years. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for decline in the TMIG-IC score for 14 years according to a 1-standard deviation (SD) increase in physical function measurements at baseline were estimated. Results: Subjects with decreased TMIG-IC scores included 78 (16.7%) men and 80 (16.2%) women. In women, the multivariate-adjusted OR (95% CI) for a TMIG-IC score decrease with a 1-SD increase in comfortable gait speed was 0.68 (0.50-0.92; p= 0.013), and that with a 1-SD increase in sway area with eyes open was 1.49 (1.17-1.90; p= 0.001). Grip strength was not associated with TMIG-IC score decline. None of the physical performance measures affected TMIG-IC score declines in men. Conclusion: These results suggest that gait speed decreases and sway area increases might predict a risk of decline in higher-level functional capacity among middle-aged and elderly women. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Otsuka R.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Kato Y.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | Kato Y.,Aichi Shukutoku University | Nishita Y.,National Institute for Longevity science NILS LSA | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging | Year: 2016

Objective: This study attempts to describe trends in energy intake and weight change over 12 years according to age at first participation in the study. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: The National Institute for Longevity Sciences - Longitudinal Study of Aging (NILS-LSA), a community-based study. Participants: Participants included 922 men and 879 women who participated in the first study-wave (age 40–79 years) and also participated in at least one study-wave from the second to seventh study-wave. Each study-wave was conducted biennially. For individuals, the entire follow-up period was 12 years. Measurements: Energy intake was calculated from 3-day dietary records with photographs. Weight and height were measured under a fasting state. To estimate linear changes in energy intake and weight over 12 years according to age at first study-wave, we used the mixed-effects model. Results: Mean (SD) follow-up time and number of study-wave visits were 9.5 (3.7) years and 5.4 (1.8) times, respectively. The fixed effect of the interaction of age and time in energy intake and weight was statistically or marginally statistically significant both in men (p<0.01) and in women (p<0.06). In men, when energy intake was estimated according to age, the rate of decrease in energy intake increased from -6.8 to -33.8 kcal/year for ages 40-79 years. In women, the rate of decrease in energy intake slightly increased in older age groups (-9.1 to -16.7 kcal/year for ages 40-79 years). Weight increased in males in their 40s (0.07 kg/year from age 40) and started to decline by age 53. In women, weight started to decline around age 47 (-0.04 kg/year). Conclusion: Twelve-year longitudinal data showed energy intake declined both in men and women in their 40s, and the rate of decrease increased in older males. Weight started to decline in men in their mid-50s and women in their late 40s. Further studies that focus on energy intake and weight reduction are needed to prevent weight loss or underweight in an increasingly aging society. © 2005, Serdi and Springer-Verlag France. Source

Discover hidden collaborations