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News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - A non-tropical low pressure system located over the central Atlantic a little more than 700 miles southwest of the Azores could strengthen into a cyclone over the next 48 hours, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Wednesday.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - Tropical storm Arlene has weakened into a post-tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Friday.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - A subtropical depression has formed over the north central Atlantic and is located about 890 miles (1,435 kilometers) westsouthwest of the Azores, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Wednesday.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - A subtropical cyclone could emerge in the next 48 hours over the central Atlantic, as a low pressure system 700 miles (1,127 km) southwest of the Azores has a 50 percent chance to strengthen, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Wednesday.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - Subtropical depression one has transitioned into a tropical depression and is expected to dissipate Thursday night or Friday, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said in its latest advisory on Thursday.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - Subtropical cyclone one, about 830 miles (1,335 kilometers) west-southwest of the Azores, is expected to dissipate by Thursday, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said in its latest advisory on Wednesday.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - Tropical Depression One has strengthened into Tropical Storm Arlene in the North Atlantic, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Thursday.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Winners of the annual Contractor Project of the Year competition were announced today by Sika Roofing, the worldwide market leader in thermoplastic roofing and waterproofing membranes. A winner and two finalists were recognized for outstanding workmanship in four categories - Low Slope, Steep Slope, Waterproofing and Sustainability - for projects completed using a Sika thermoplastic membrane for roofing or waterproofing applications. “Congratulations to the winners of the 2016 Contractor Project of the Year competition,” said Brian J. Whelan, Sika Roofing’s Executive Vice President. “Each entry is judged on project complexity, design uniqueness, craftsmanship, and creative problem solving. We salute the winners for their dedication to the roofing industry and installation excellence.” RSS Roofing Services & Solutions of St. Louis won first place for installing a Sarnafil RhinoBond System at the Department of Energy’s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Ky. This massive project consisted of 3.2 million square feet of roof area on five separate buildings. The second place winner was Utah Tile & Roofing, Inc., of Salt Lake City for the Peace Coliseum at Overstock’s Corporate Campus, also in Salt Lake City. Third place went to Advanced Roofing Inc., of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., for the National Hurricane Center in Miami. Alliance Roofing Company, Inc., of Santa Clara, Calif., was awarded first place for their work on the beautiful new Endeavor Building at NVIDIA’s Headquarters in Santa Clara. The structure’s distinctive design is based on the triangle, the fundamental building block of computer graphics, and nowhere is that more evident than the complex roof. Midland Engineering Company, Inc., of South Bend, Ind., was the second-place finisher for the Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. Josall Syracuse, Inc., of Syracuse, N.Y., was the third-place finalist for their work on the Onondaga County Water Treatment Plant in Oswego, N.Y. Recover Green Roofs of Somerville, Mass., took first place in the Waterproofing class for their superb work on Harvard Business School’s McArthur Hall/McCollum Center in Boston. The company utilized the Sarnafil G 410 membrane to help create a green roof that has the capability of growing a huge variety of wildflowers and native species that mimic the biology of a natural meadow, self-regenerating with each season. The second-place project was awarded to Nations Roof of Carolina for their impressive green roof on Central Piedmont Community College’s Pease Auditorium, which overlooks the skyline of Charlotte. HRGM Corporation took third place thanks to their work on the Lafayette Elementary School in Washington, D.C. In the Sustainability Category, Sullivan Roofing, Inc., of Schaumburg, Ill., won for the Zurich Insurance North America Headquarters in Schaumburg. This enormous project forced Sullivan Roofing to have three to four crews installing different roofing systems at locations throughout the facility. In second place was Noorda BEC of Salt Lake City for delivering a solar roof with a Sarnafil membrane to the Vivint SmartHome Arena, also in Salt Lake City. In third place for this grouping was BEST Contracting Services, Inc., of Gardena, Calif., for their work on the Los Angeles Convention Center. More than 45 contractors from around the U.S. submitted projects for evaluation in the annual Sika Roofing Project of the Year competition. First place winners were awarded cash prizes, recognition at an awards dinner at the International Roofing Expo and marketing support in the form or advertisements, social media and public relations. Sika is a specialty chemicals company with a leading position in the development and production of systems and products for bonding, sealing, damping, reinforcing and protecting in the building sector and automotive industry. Sika has subsidiaries in 97 countries around the world and manufactures in over 190 factories. Its more than 17,000 employees generated annual sales of CHF 5.75 billion in 2016. For more information about Sika Corporation in the U.S. including Canton, Mass., visit http://usa.sarnafil.sika.com.


News Article | October 12, 2016
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

It may very well be the strongest hurricane, for wind speeds, that human beings have ever been able to measure. In October of last year, Hurricane Patricia spun up south of Mexico and briefly attained a wind speed intensity of 185 knots, or 213 miles per hour, on Oc. 23, based on an analysis by the U.S. National Hurricane Center. As I wrote earlier this year, there is one hurricane in the record books (a typhoon, actually) that was also claimed to have had winds of 185 knots, but that was back in the 1960s when researchers are no longer fully confident in the way wind speeds were estimated. Patricia was therefore, for wind speeds, vastly stronger than Hurricane Matthew, also a Category 5 storm — and we saw how much damage it was capable of. Yet Matthew’s strongest winds were only estimated at 140 knots, or 161 miles per hour, in the Caribbean. Patricia is really the kind of storm that makes you think we need a Category 6. So what created a storm like Patricia — and could there be more of them in our future? In a new study in Geophysical Research Letters, oceanographers Gregory Foltz of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Karthik Balaguru of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory studied the oceanic conditions last year that triggered Patricia. Sure enough, due to the powerful El Niño event that had long been in the works and finally fully developed last year, ocean surface temperatures were much hotter than normal along the storm’s path — 1.5 degrees hotter even than they were during the strong El Niño event in 1997. But that’s just the beginning. What mattered was not only how hot the waters were at the surface, the research finds, but the depth to which they stayed hot. You see, strong hurricanes kick up enormous waves and therefore stir the ocean greatly — bringing up cooler water from below. That cooler water can then tamp down on the storm’s intensity. But that didn’t happen as much with Patricia. The warm water layer was very thick at the surface and the surface elevation of the ocean itself was much higher than usual, due to all the warm water that had piled up in the Eastern Pacific as a consequence of El Niño. The beginning of the so-called “thermocline,” the ocean layer between the warm surface and the cooler depths, was also considerably deeper than usual, the study finds, being weighed down by all the extra water piled up in the region. “More than just the single large El Niño event of 2015 and 2016, it was really this long period of El Niño type conditions in the central Pacific, extending back to 2014, that tended to produce record deep thermocline anomalies in the Patricia region,” said Foltz. “You have this really record warm sea surface temperatures, and record deep pool of warm water in the northeastern tropical Pacific.” And still, that’s not all. The study also highlights an intriguing factor you don’t hear about much in hurricane research — the sea water in the area was fresher than usual. That’s because this was near where both the Rio Grande de Santiago and the Balsas River empty into the ocean. Fresh water is lighter than salty water, and so this meant the column of ocean water was more “stratified” — unlikely to mix. That, too, prevented the storm from stirring up cooler waters from below. “What this would do is it provides stability for the upper ocean, so it tends to reduce the mixing, reducing the cooling due to mixing in the upper ocean,” Foltz said. All of this together meant the “potential intensity” the storm could achieve was simply off the charts, the study reports. Two outside scientists contacted by the Post praised the study, but one also added that it may not be the full story. “The fresh water anomaly (low salinity implying greater stratification) is a relatively new idea that is starting to get some traction in the research community,” said James Elsner, a researcher at Florida State University who commented on the study for the Post, by email. “Along these lines I would argue that perhaps Matthew’s anomalous (severely under-predicted) intensification last week near the coast of South America was due to a tendency for that region to have low salinity” because of its proximity to the Orinoco and Amazon rivers, Elsner added. “The circumstances surrounding Patricia were unusual, to say the least,” added MIT hurricane researcher Kerry Emanuel. “I agree with the authors of the study you are writing about that the unusual El Niño of 2015 played a role. But reduction of ocean mixing by extra salinity stratification, and higher than normal [sea surface temperatures] do not explain the whole problem.” Emanuel said in his models, only when you also dial down an atmospheric parameter called “vertical wind shear” as well do you get a hurricane close to as strong as Patricia. Vertical wind shear refers to a situation in which winds in the upper and lower atmosphere blow in different directions, which can lead to the structure of a hurricane being blown apart. The current study did not focus on the atmospheric conditions driving Patricia, noting that those would also have to be examined in the future. “For this situation, it was record warm surface temperatures in the ocean, and a record deep pool of warm water,” said Foltz. “So it was just a really powerful combination of the two.”


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - Tropical storm Otto was forecast to become a hurricane again on Thursday before weakening over central America after landfall, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Wednesday.

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