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Morihara R.,Okayama University | Kono S.,Okayama University | Sato K.,Okayama University | Hishikawa N.,Okayama University | And 9 more authors.
Translational Stroke Research | Year: 2016

Clinical data from Japan on the safety and real-world outcomes of alteplase (tPA) thrombolysis in the extended therapeutic window are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and real-world outcomes of tPA administered within 3–4.5 h of stroke onset. The study comprised consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 177) admitted across five hospitals between September 2012 and August 2014. Patients received intravenous tPA within <3 or 3–4.5 h of stroke onset. Endovascular therapy was used for tPA-refractory patients. In the 3–4.5 h subgroup (31.6 % of patients), tPA was started 85 min later than the <3 h group (220 vs. 135 min, respectively). However, outcome measures were not significantly different between the <3 and 3–4.5 h subgroups for recanalization rate (67.8 vs. 57.1 %), symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (2.5 vs. 3.6 %), modified Rankin Scale score of 0–1 at 3 months (36.0 vs. 23.4 %), and mortality (6.9 vs. 8.3 %). We present data from 2005 to 2012 using a therapeutic window <3 h showing comparable results. tPA following endovascular therapy with recanalization might be superior to tPA only with recanalization (81.0 vs. 59.1 %). Compared with administration within 3 h of ischemic stroke onset, tPA administration within 3–4.5 h of ischemic stroke onset in real-world stroke emergency settings at multiple sites in Japan is as safe and has the same outcomes. © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Source


Kono S.,Okayama University | Deguchi K.,Okayama University | Morimoto N.,Okayama University | Kurata T.,Okayama University | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases | Year: 2013

Background: Alteplase, a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), was approved for patients with acute ischemic stroke within 3 hours of stroke onset in Japan in October 2005 at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of alteplase in elderly patients in Japan. Methods: One hundred twenty-nine consecutive patients who were admitted to our 5 hospital groups and who received intravenous tPA within 3 hours of stroke onset between January 2010 and December 2011 were divided into 2 groups by age (<80 years of age [younger group] and >80 years of age [older group]) and by treatment with or without edaravone. Clinical backgrounds and outcomes were investigated. Results: The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission was not different in both groups, but the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores 7 days after stroke onset were significantly higher in the older group (score 8; P <.05) than in the younger group (score 4), and the ratio of patients with a modified Rankin Scale score of 4 to 6 was significantly greater in the older group (41.7%; P <.05) than in the younger group (22.2%). However, there was no difference in asymptomatic and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage rates between the younger and older groups (asymptomatic 20.2% v 18.8%; symptomatic 2.6% v 2.1%). Patients with edaravone showed a higher recanalization rate (61.9%; P <.01) and a better modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months poststroke (P <.01) than the nonedaravone group. Conclusions: These data suggest that intravenous alteplase (0.6 mg/kg) within 3 hours of stroke onset was safe and effective, even for very old patients (≥80 years of age), but resulted in poor outcomes relating not to tPA but to aging. In addition, edaravone may be a good partner for combination therapy with tPA to enhance recanalization and reduce hemorrhagic transformation. © 2013 by National Stroke Association. Source


Kono S.,Okayama University | Deguchi K.,Okayama University | Morimoto N.,Okayama University | Kurata T.,Okayama University | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases | Year: 2013

In October 2005 in Japan, the recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) alteplase was approved for patients with acute ischemic stroke within 3 hours of onset at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg. The present study was undertaken to assess the safety and efficacy of alteplase in Japan. Between October 2005 and December 2009, a total of 114 consecutive patients admitted to 4 hospitals received intravenous tPA within 3 hours of stroke onset. Clinical backgrounds and outcomes were investigated. The patients were divided into 2 chronological groups: an early group, comprising 45 patients treated between October 2005 and December 2007, and a later group, comprising 69 patients treated between January 2008 and December 2009. The mean time from arrival at the hospital to the initiation of treatment was significantly reduced in the later group, from 82.6 minutes to 70.9 minutes. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) occurred in 26 patients (22.8%); compared with patients without ICH, these patients had a significantly higher prevalence of cardiogenic embolism (88.5% vs 58.0%); greater warfarin use (26.8% vs 6.8%); higher mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores on admission (16 vs 10), at 3 days after admission (14 vs 5), and at 7 days after admission (13.5 vs 3); and a lower Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (7.8 vs 9.1). Patients who received edaravone had a higher prevalence of cardiogenic embolism (70.9% vs 36.4%), a higher recanalization rate (77.7% vs 36.4%), and lower NIHSS scores on admission and at 3 and 7 days after admission compared with those who did not receive edaravone. Our data suggest that administration of intravenous alteplase 0.6 mg/kg within 3 hours of stroke onset is safe and effective, that the NIHSS and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score are useful predictors of ICH after tPA administration, and that warfarin-treated patients are more likely to develop symptomatic ICH despite an International Normalized Ratio <1.7. © 2013 by National Stroke Association. Source

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