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Hartman M.,MediCaid | Martin A.B.,Office of the Actuary | Benson J.,Office of the Actuary | Catlin A.,National Health Statistics Group
Health Affairs | Year: 2013

In 2011 US health care spending grew 3.9 percent to reach $2.7 trillion, marking the third consecutive year of relatively slow growth. Growth in national health spending closely tracked growth in nominal gross domestic product (GDP) in 2010 and 2011, and health spending as a share of GDP remained stable from 2009 through 2011, at 17.9 percent. Even as growth in spending at the national level has remained stable, personal health care spending growth accelerated in 2011 (from 3.7 percent to 4.1 percent), in part because of faster growth in spending for prescription drugs and physician and clinical services. There were also divergent trends in spending growth in 2011 depending on the payment source: Medicaid spending growth slowed, while growth in Medicare, private health insurance, and out-of-pocket spending accelerated. Overall, there was relatively slow growth in incomes, jobs, and GDP in 2011, which raises questions about whether US health care spending will rebound over the next few years as it typically has after past economic downturns. © 2013 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Hartman M.,MediCaid | Martin A.,CMS | Nuccio O.,CMS | Catlin A.,National Health Statistics Group
Health Affairs | Year: 2010

In 2008, U.S. health care spending growth slowed to 4.4 percent-the slowest rate of growth over the past forty-eight years. The deceleration was broadly based for nearly all payers and health care goods and services, as growth in both price and nonprice factors slowed amid the recession. Despite the slowdown, national health spending reached $2.3 trillion, or $7,681 per person, and the health care portion of gross domestic product (GDP) grew from 15.9 percent in 2007 to 16.2 percent in 2008. These developments reflect the general pattern that larger increases in the health spending share of GDP generally occur during or just after periods of economic recession. Despite the overall slowdown in national health spending growth, increases in this spending continue to outpace growth in the resources available to pay for it. © 2010 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Martin A.B.,MediCaid | Hartman M.,CMS Office of the Actuary | Whittle L.,CMS Office of the Actuary | Catlin A.,National Health Statistics Group
Health Affairs | Year: 2014

For the fourth consecutive year, growth in health care spending remained low, increasing by 3.7 percent in 2012 to $2.8 trillion. At the same time, the share of the economy devoted to health fell slightly (from 17.3 percent to 17.2 percent) as the nominal gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 4.6 percent. Faster growth in hospital services and in physician and clinical services was mitigated by slower growth in prices for prescription drugs and nursing home services. Despite an uptick in enrollment growth, Medicare spending growth slowed slightly in 2012, mainly due to lower payment updates. For Medicaid, slowing enrollment growth kept spending growth near historic lows. Growth in private health insurance spending also remained near historically low rates in 2012, largely influenced by the nation's modest economic recovery and its impact on enrollment. © 2014 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Martin A.,MediCaid | Lassman D.,MediCaid | Whittle L.,MediCaid | Catlin A.,National Health Statistics Group
Health Affairs | Year: 2011

In 2009, US health care spending grew 4.0 percent - a historically low rate of annual increase - to $2.5 trillion, or $8,086 per person. Despite the slower growth, the share of the gross domestic product devoted to health spending increased to 17.6 percent in 2009 from 16.6 percent in 2008. The growth rate of health spending continued to outpace the growth of the overall economy, which experienced its largest drop since 1938. The recession contributed to slower growth in private health insurance spending and out-of-pocket spending by consumers, as well as a reduction in capital investments by health care providers. The recession also placed increased burdens on households, businesses, and governments, which meant that fewer financial resources were available to pay for health care. Declining federal revenues and strong growth in federal health spending increased the health spending share of total federal revenue from 37.6 percent in 2008 to 54.2 percent in 2009. ©2011 Project HOPE - The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Keehan S.P.,MediCaid | Cuckler G.A.,CMS Office of the Actuary | Sisko A.M.,CMS Office of the Actuary | Madison A.J.,CMS Office of the Actuary | And 5 more authors.
Health Affairs | Year: 2015

Health spending growth in the United States is projected to average 5.8 percent for 2014-24, reflecting the Affordable Care Act's coverage expansions, faster economic growth, and population aging. Recent historically low growth rates in the use of medical goods and services, as well as medical prices, are expected to gradually increase. However, in part because of the impact of continued cost-sharing increases that are anticipated among health plans, the acceleration of these growth rates is expected to be modest. The health share of US gross domestic product is projected to rise from 17.4 percent in 2013 to 19.6 percent in 2024. © 2015 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Hartman M.,MediCaid | Martin A.B.,MediCaid | Lassman D.,MediCaid | Catlin A.,National Health Statistics Group
Health Affairs | Year: 2015

In 2013 US health care spending increased 3.6 percent to $2.9 trillion, or 9,255 per person. The share of gross domestic product devoted to health care spending has remained at 17.4 percent since 2009. Health care spending decelerated 0.5 percentage point in 2013, compared to 2012, as a result of slower growth in private health insurance and Medicare spending. Slower growth in spending for hospital care, investments in medical structures and equipment, and spending for physician and clinical care also contributed to the low overall increase. © 2014 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Catlin M.K.,MediCaid | Poisal J.A.,National Health Statistics Group | Cowan C.A.,CMS Office of the Actuary
Health Affairs | Year: 2015

Out-of-pocket health care spending in the United States totaled $306.2 billion in 2010 and represented 11.8 percent of total national health expenditures, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' National Health Expenditure Accounts. Spending by people with employer-sponsored health insurance and those covered by Medicare accounted for over 80 percent of total out-of-pocket spending. People without comprehensive medical coverage accounted for less than 8 percent of all out-of-pocket expenditures in 2010. Between 2007 and 2010 per person out-of-pocket spending grew most rapidly for people primarily covered by employer-sponsored insurance and declined for people primarily covered by Medicare and those without coverage. © 2015 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Martin A.B.,MediCaid | Lassman D.,CMS Office of the Actuary | Washington B.,CMS Office of the Actuary | Catlin A.,National Health Statistics Group
Health Affairs | Year: 2012

medical goods and services are generally viewed as necessities. Even so, the latest recession had a dramatic effect on their utilization. US health spending grew more slowly in 2009 and 2010-at rates of 3.8 percent and 3.9 percent, respectively-than in any other years during the fifty-one-year history of the National Health Expenditure Accounts. In 2010 extraordinarily slow growth in the use and intensity of services led to slower growth in spending for personal health care. The rates of growth in overall US gross domestic product (GDP) and in health spending began to converge in 2010. As a result, the health spending share of GDP stabilized at 17.9 percent.© 2012 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Martin A.B.,MediCaid | Hartman M.,CMS Office of the Actuary | Benson J.,CMS Office of the Actuary | Catlin A.,National Health Statistics Group
Health Affairs | Year: 2016

US health care spending increased 5.3 percent to $3.0 trillion in 2014. On a per capita basis, health spending was $9,523 in 2014, an increase of 4.5 percent from 2013. The share of gross domestic product devoted to health care spending was 17.5 percent, up from 17.3 percent in 2013. The faster growth in 2014 that followed five consecutive years of historically low growth was primarily due to the major coverage expansions under the Affordable Care Act, particularly for Medicaid and private health insurance, which contributed to an increase in the insured share of the population. Additionally, the introduction of new hepatitis C drugs contributed to rapid growth in retail prescription drug expenditures, which increased by 12.2 percent in 2014. Spending by the federal government grew at a faster rate in 2014 than spending by other sponsors of health care, leading to a 2-percentage-point increase in its share of total health care spending between 2013 and 2014.


Cylus J.,World Health Organizations European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies | Hartman M.,National Health Statistics Group | Washington B.,National Health Statistics Group | Andrews K.,National Health Statistics Group | Catlin A.,National Health Statistics Group
Health Affairs | Year: 2011

This paper examines differences in national health care spending by gender and age. Our research found significant variations in per person spending by gender across age groups, health services, and types of payers. For example, in 2004 per capita health care spending for females was 32 percent more than for males. Per capita differences were most pronounced among the working-age population, largely because of spending for maternity care. Except for children, total spending for and by females was greater than that for and by males, for most services and payers. The gender difference in total spending was most pronounced in the elderly, as a result of the longer life expectancy of women. ©2010 Project HOPE - The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

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