Long Island City, NY, United States
Long Island City, NY, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Researchers looking more closely than ever before into everyday mobile device habits - and in particular the impact smartphone and tablet apps have on data demand - are suggesting ways that society can cut back on its digital energy consumption. European smartphone data growth is relentless, with data traffic predicted to rise from 1.2GB to 6.5GB a month per person. Although precise energy estimates are difficult, and depend on the service and network conditions, for video streaming each gigabyte of data can be estimated to consume 200 watt-hours of energy through Internet infrastructure and datacentres. Following a detailed study on Android device users, and comparing observations with a large dataset of almost 400 UK and Ireland mobile devices, computer scientists at Lancaster University and the University of Cambridge identified four categories of data-hungry services - watching video, social networking, communications and listening. These four categories equate to around half of mobile data demand. Watching videos (21 per cent of daily aggregate mobile data demand) and listening to music (11 per cent) are identified as the two most data-intensive activities. They are popular during the peak electricity demand hours of between 4pm and 8pm (when carbon emissions due to generation on UK National Grid are highest), but watching is particularly popular in the late hours before bedtime. People make their workdays more enjoyable by streaming music, with listening demand peaking during commuting hours and also at lunchtime. The researchers recommend designers look at creating features for devices or apps that encourage people to gather together with friends and family to enjoy streamed media - reducing the overall number of data streams and downloads. Kelly Widdicks, PhD student at Lancaster University's School of Computing and Communications, said: "To reduce energy consumption, app designers could look at ways to coordinate people to enjoy programmes together with friends and family, listening to locally-stored or cached music, and developing special celebratory times - weekly or monthly - to more fully appreciate streamed media, rather than binge watching. "But at least equally important is the role of service and content providers. Our studies show significant evidence that automatic queueing of additional video, and unprompted loading of selected content leads to more streaming than might otherwise have happened." Social networking also causes large demands for data and the researchers suggest systems architects re-evaluate the social importance and meaning of videos streamed over these platforms, alongside the energy required. "Media, and therefore data demand, is embedded into social networking apps. We propose that this dogma of all-you-can-eat data should be challenged, for example by reducing previews or making people click through to view content that interests them," said Dr Oliver Bates, senior researcher at Lancaster University's School of Computing and Computing and Communications. "This may dissuade people from simply viewing media just because it is easily accessible. "Our participants indicated there was often little meaning or utility to the automated picture feeds, and video adverts common to many social media apps." Figures obtained through the study indicate energy consumption through instant messaging apps' data demand is around ten times higher than that of SMS. If people were to default back to sending messages via SMS rather than instant messaging services, it would help to reduce data and energy consumption further. However, the researchers point out that to make an SMS-like service practical again, more of the features of instant messages would need to be adopted. "By using SMS for simple text messaging, or a low-overhead instant messaging service (such as one which sends images at lower resolutions), there is good potential to decrease energy consumption from communications," said Miss Widdicks. "Mobile service providers and device designers can make it more convenient for people to switch between communication methods. SMS and MMS services could be revised to better suit the phone user today, such as by sending photos at a lower cost to the subscriber, catering better for group messages and by informing users that their sent messages have been received - all reasons why people use instant messaging apps," she added. The research is detailed in the paper 'Demand Around the Clock: Time Use and Data Demand of Mobile Devices in Everyday Life', which was presented this May in Denver, Colorado, at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), the premier international conference of human-computer interaction. Explore further: World should consider limits to future internet expansion to control energy consumption


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Scrapping automatically-playing videos in apps and reversing trends of instant messaging and on-demand services could be key to cutting the growing energy demand of the Internet. Researchers looking more closely than ever before into everyday mobile device habits -- and in particular the impact smartphone and tablet apps have on data demand -- are suggesting ways that society can cut back on its digital energy consumption. European smartphone data growth is relentless, with data traffic predicted to rise from 1.2GB to 6.5GB a month per person. Although precise energy estimates are difficult, and depend on the service and network conditions, for video streaming each gigabyte of data can be estimated to consume 200 watt-hours of energy through Internet infrastructure and datacentres. Following a detailed study on Android device users, and comparing observations with a large dataset of almost 400 UK and Ireland mobile devices, computer scientists at Lancaster University and the University of Cambridge identified four categories of data-hungry services -- watching video, social networking, communications and listening. These four categories equate to around half of mobile data demand. Watching videos (21 per cent of daily aggregate mobile data demand) and listening to music (11 per cent) are identified as the two most data-intensive activities. They are popular during the peak electricity demand hours of between 4pm and 8pm (when carbon emissions due to generation on UK National Grid are highest), but watching is particularly popular in the late hours before bedtime. People make their workdays more enjoyable by streaming music, with listening demand peaking during commuting hours and also at lunchtime. The researchers recommend designers look at creating features for devices or apps that encourage people to gather together with friends and family to enjoy streamed media -- reducing the overall number of data streams and downloads. Kelly Widdicks, PhD student at Lancaster University's School of Computing and Communications, said: "To reduce energy consumption, app designers could look at ways to coordinate people to enjoy programmes together with friends and family, listening to locally-stored or cached music, and developing special celebratory times -- weekly or monthly -- to more fully appreciate streamed media, rather than binge watching. "But at least equally important is the role of service and content providers. Our studies show significant evidence that automatic queueing of additional video, and unprompted loading of selected content leads to more streaming than might otherwise have happened." Social networking also causes large demands for data and the researchers suggest systems architects re-evaluate the social importance and meaning of videos streamed over these platforms, alongside the energy required. "Media, and therefore data demand, is embedded into social networking apps. We propose that this dogma of all-you-can-eat data should be challenged, for example by reducing previews or making people click through to view content that interests them," said Dr Oliver Bates, senior researcher at Lancaster University's School of Computing and Computing and Communications. "This may dissuade people from simply viewing media just because it is easily accessible. "Our participants indicated there was often little meaning or utility to the automated picture feeds, and video adverts common to many social media apps." Figures obtained through the study indicate energy consumption through instant messaging apps' data demand is around ten times higher than that of SMS. If people were to default back to sending messages via SMS rather than instant messaging services, it would help to reduce data and energy consumption further. However, the researchers point out that to make an SMS-like service practical again, more of the features of instant messages would need to be adopted. "By using SMS for simple text messaging, or a low-overhead instant messaging service (such as one which sends images at lower resolutions), there is good potential to decrease energy consumption from communications," said Miss Widdicks. "Mobile service providers and device designers can make it more convenient for people to switch between communication methods. SMS and MMS services could be revised to better suit the phone user today, such as by sending photos at a lower cost to the subscriber, catering better for group messages and by informing users that their sent messages have been received -- all reasons why people use instant messaging apps," she added. The research is detailed in the paper 'Demand Around the Clock: Time Use and Data Demand of Mobile Devices in Everyday Life', which was presented this May in Denver, Colorado, at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), the premier international conference of human-computer interaction.


News Article | May 20, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Labour has outlined plans to bring the rail, water and energy supply industries back into public ownership. Royal Mail will also be nationalised as part of a manifesto pledge to reverse some of the high-profile privatisations pushed through by the Conservatives in the 1980s and 90s, and by the more recent coalition government. Shadow chancellor John McDonnell brushed aside concerns that it would be a step back to an era when nationalised industries were characterised by lack of investment, labour disputes and poor services. Nonetheless, questions remain. Buying National Grid, which runs the UK’s energy transmission network, would cost £38bn based on its current capitalisation, though that includes its US business, which the government presumably wouldn’t want. The six power networks and four gas networks – separately owned entities that look after local power and gas – are valued at £60bn, but Labour has stressed any nationalisation programme for energy would be a gradual process. Nationalising 32 water companies in England and Wales will also be costly. The water regulator, Ofwat, puts the capital value of the industry at £69bn. For Royal Mail, Labour says it would acquire enough shares to restore majority public control. Buying 50.1% of it would mean an investment of just over £2.15bn at current share price. The rail industry will cost nothing, because track and station owner Network Rail is already state-owned. That leaves the train franchises, which the state just could take over when franchises lapse. Economists Jonathan Portes of King’s College London and Tony Yates of Birmingham University jumped to McDonnell’s defence when he said the policy wouldn’t add to Britain’s debt burden. Unlike the nationalisations of failing industries in the 1930s and 1940s, Railtrack in 2002 and the banks in 2008, Labour’s targets are thriving. It may seem like an accounting sleight of hand, but the cost of privatisation would be balanced by the value of the asset acquired. Regional water franchises were sold, not leased, so Labour would need to buy out those shareholders. It would also need money to buy Royal Mail shares. Cash can be borrowed at ultra cheap rates on international money markets, though, and the government will then take the profit usually passed to shareholders. McDonnell says he would make shareholders trade shares for bonds: the government would still need to pay bondholders interest, but the profit margin would be shared with consumers. Imagine a privately owned water company has a 10% profit margin. If Whitehall lawyers managed to negotiate 5% annual interest on these bonds, consumers could get the remaining 5%, which the government would distribute through lower bills. Plans to renationalise energy transmission companies are less clear. The manifesto says Labour will “regain control of energy supply networks through the alteration of operator licence conditions, and transition to a publicly owned, decentralised energy system.” This is likely to be a more organic process, whereby the government funds municipal networks that will take over the National Grid on an area-by-area basis. In addition, the government will support a new breed of local supplier to compete with the big six retailers of power that include Centrica, E.ON and EDF. This part is uncosted for now. Labour says it will “cut household bills by £220 a year”. But the process will be slow as the changes to a complex industry are negotiated. It could take control of the National Grid at huge cost. It could change the firm’s investment policies and promote renewable energy, but this would increase bills, not cut them. A move to municipal ownership of power lines and local generation could reduce bills, but only after much investment. Buying water companies and Royal Mail could realise a more immediate gain, but this could be eroded by demands from the government to increase investment. Critics also say a Labour government would come under pressure to pay higher wages. Keeping post office delivery centres from closure, which Labour highlights in its manifesto, is a union demand that few voters would consider important. It depends how well the government runs nationalised businesses. Their value could fall if they become loss-making. Academics have found private operators no more effective or efficient than public owners. Money is usually the key. The trains are safer and popular with buckets of public investment. Labour says Royal Mail has paid out £640m in dividends in three years while closing 10% of delivery offices. As an owner of Royal Mail, the government did much the same: the Treasury took all the surpluses and invested very little in new machinery or processes. And to compete with Amazon an increase in investment would be vital.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.renewableenergyworld.com

In the U.K., National Grid is the utility that owns the high voltage electricity network in England and Wales. It is also one of four British gas distribution companies. It’s a big player — “joining everything up” — within the UK’s overall energy system.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.renewableenergyworld.com

On Friday, May 26, on what was expected to be one of the hottest days of the year, solar panels in the UK generated a record amount of power, enough to meet almost 25 percent of demand. This is according to data compiled by National Grid Plc and Sheffield University. At noon London-time, 8.75 GW of power was being generated by the solar PV, breaking a previous record of 8.49 GW, overtaking nuclear power in the country.  


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

St. Joseph’s College (SJC) is pleased to announce its newly created educational partnership with Northwell Health. As part of this partnership, the College will offer a generously discounted tuition rate to all Northwell Health employees who wish to enroll for land-based education at either SJC Long Island or SJC Brooklyn. Enrolled students must be new to SJC or wish to further their education as graduate students. “SJC has been proactive in developing partnerships with a number of corporations,” said Gail Lamberta, Ph.D., associate dean of community development and chair of the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies at SJC. “These corporate entities, both large and small, provide quality opportunities for our many internship programs. As such, our students are able to gain invaluable experiences that often lead to viable professional positions within their respective disciplines.” The College’s current educational partners include Teachers Federal Credit Union (TFCU), Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center, Long Island Railroad, Catholic Charities, Estee Lauder, Ridgewood Savings Bank, The Brooklyn Diocese and National Grid. “Professionals from many of our corporate partnerships serve on academic-specific advisory councils, as panelists and presenters, both in class and at organized events, and work in a collaborative way on initiatives that have a positive impact on our local and global communities,” Dr. Lamberta said. “Together, with our partners, SJC is able to stay on the cutting edge of programs and services, which enhance the quality of our academic programs and better prepares our students for the 21st century workforce.” For more information about current land-based programs at SJC Long Island and SJC Brooklyn, visit sjcny.edu. ABOUT NORTHWELL HEALTH As New York State’s largest health care provider and private employer, Northwell Health’s mission is to improve the health of its communities. Northwell’s focus is on prevention, wellness and providing the full continuum of diagnosis, treatment and after-care services to all those it serves. ABOUT ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE St. Joseph’s College has been dedicated to providing a diverse population of students in the New York metropolitan area with an affordable education rooted in the liberal arts tradition since 1916. Independent and coeducational, the College provides a strong academic and value-oriented education at the undergraduate and graduate levels, aiming to prepare each student for a life characterized by integrity, intellectual and spiritual values, social responsibility and service. Through SJC Brooklyn, SJC Long Island and SJC Online, the College offers degrees in 50 majors, special course offerings and certificates, affiliated and pre-professional programs.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The investment will be used to support CIMCON's channel partners and accelerate development and deployment of the company's Smart City product portfolio. "The worldwide upgrade to LED lighting, coupled with added pressure on cities to reduce operating costs and provide enhanced services to residents, has helped drive adoption of our technologies," said Anil Agrawal, Founder & CEO of CIMCON Lighting. "CIMCON delivers immediate value to our customers while providing a clear path to future Smart City applications such as environmental sensors, traffic and pedestrian monitors, video analytics, electric vehicle chargers and smart phone apps. We are pleased to partner with EIP as we respond to customer demand to go beyond intelligent lighting by integrating additional grid edge devices and associated data analytics to help realize their vision for a Smart City." Lindsay Luger, Managing Director at EIP added, "CIMCON's software and hardware solutions provide owners of outdoor lighting with a strong value proposition today, as well as a path to enable Smart City applications of the future. Our utility partners that own and operate city street lights are increasingly interested in improving the cost and performance of these systems, as well as providing the public with additional services. We are excited about the natural fit between the utilities' strategic direction and CIMCON's capabilities and vision." About CIMCON Lighting, Inc. With a heritage of over 25 years of innovation and experience in industrial automation and outdoor wireless applications, CIMCON Lighting is the world's leading provider of intelligent wireless outdoor lighting controls and Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled Smart City lighting management solutions. The company's technologies provide a future-proof platform that enables cities to begin their path to "smart" by managing, monitoring, metering and even monetizing street lights and other assets to improve quality of life for city residents. CIMCON's solutions are appropriate for street and roadway lighting, parking lots and garages, business and college campuses, and a variety of industrial applications. For more information, please visit www.cimconlighting.com. About Energy Impact Partners Energy Impact Partners is a collaborative strategic investment firm that invests in companies optimizing energy consumption and improving sustainable energy generation. Through close collaboration with its strategic investor base, EIP seeks to bring the best companies, buying power and vision in the industry to bear on the emerging energy landscape. EIP's partners include Southern Company, National Grid, Xcel Energy, Ameren, Great Plains Energy, Fortis Inc., AGL, Avista, Madison Gas and Electric Co., and TEPCO. For more information, visit www.energyimpactpartners.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cimcon-lighting-raises-15-million-300463349.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

CIMCON's hardware and cloud-based or on-premises software helps utilities, municipalities and transportation departments reduce energy, repairs and maintenance expenses, while increasing the quality of lighting services through intelligent energy, asset, and fault management. Since its founding in 2012, the company's "best in class" solutions have been used to monitor and control hundreds of thousands of outdoor street and roadway lights in 16 countries. The investment will be used to support CIMCON's channel partners and accelerate development and deployment of the company's Smart City product portfolio. "The worldwide upgrade to LED lighting, coupled with added pressure on cities to reduce operating costs and provide enhanced services to residents, has helped drive adoption of our technologies," said Anil Agrawal, Founder & CEO of CIMCON Lighting. "CIMCON delivers immediate value to our customers while providing a clear path to future Smart City applications such as environmental sensors, traffic and pedestrian monitors, video analytics, electric vehicle chargers and smart phone apps. We are pleased to partner with EIP as we respond to customer demand to go beyond intelligent lighting by integrating additional grid edge devices and associated data analytics to help realize their vision for a Smart City." Lindsay Luger, Managing Director at EIP added, "CIMCON's software and hardware solutions provide owners of outdoor lighting with a strong value proposition today, as well as a path to enable Smart City applications of the future. Our utility partners that own and operate city street lights are increasingly interested in improving the cost and performance of these systems, as well as providing the public with additional services. We are excited about the natural fit between the utilities' strategic direction and CIMCON's capabilities and vision." About CIMCON Lighting, Inc. With a heritage of over 25 years of innovation and experience in industrial automation and outdoor wireless applications, CIMCON Lighting is the world's leading provider of intelligent wireless outdoor lighting controls and Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled Smart City lighting management solutions. The company's technologies provide a future-proof platform that enables cities to begin their path to "smart" by managing, monitoring, metering and even monetizing street lights and other assets to improve quality of life for city residents. CIMCON's solutions are appropriate for street and roadway lighting, parking lots and garages, business and college campuses, and a variety of industrial applications. For more information, please visit www.cimconlighting.com. About Energy Impact Partners Energy Impact Partners is a collaborative strategic investment firm that invests in companies optimizing energy consumption and improving sustainable energy generation. Through close collaboration with its strategic investor base, EIP seeks to bring the best companies, buying power and vision in the industry to bear on the emerging energy landscape. EIP's partners include Southern Company, National Grid, Xcel Energy, Ameren, Great Plains Energy, Fortis Inc., AGL, Avista, Madison Gas and Electric Co., and TEPCO. For more information, visit www.energyimpactpartners.com.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Solar power has broken new records in the UK by providing nearly a quarter of the country’s electricity needs, thanks to sunny skies and relatively low summer demand. National Grid said the thousands of photovoltaic panels on rooftops and in fields across the UK were generating 8.7GW, or 24.3% of demand at 1pm on Friday, smashing the previous high of 8.48GW earlier this month. Experts said the unprecedented share for solar energy meant about 60% of the UK’s power was low carbon, taking into account Britain’s wind farms and nuclear power stations too. That figure is normally around 50%. National Grid, which is tasked with ensuring a match between supply and demand for electricity, said it was excited but unfazed by the challenge of accommodating “significant volumes” of renewables. Duncan Burt, who manages day-to-day operation of the grid, said: “We have planned for these changes to the energy landscape and have the tools available to ensure we can balance supply and demand.” Hannah Martin, head of energy at Greenpeace, said: “Today’s new record is a reminder of what the UK could achieve if our government reversed its cuts to support for solar, and backed the clean technologies that could provide jobs, business opportunities and plentiful clean energy for decades to come.” The milestone reached on Friday is the latest in a series of records for solar, which has grown from almost nothing seven years ago to 12GW of capacity today. Last summer it provided more power than the UK’s last 10 coal-fired power stations. In April this year, Britain achieved its first-ever full working day without coal power since it started burning the fuel in 1882, thanks in part to solar energy. Solar’s rapid growth is overturning conventions for the managers of the UK’s power grid. In March, for the first time ever, the amount of electricity demanded by homes and businesses in the afternoon was lower than it was in the night, thanks to the cut in demand due to solar panels. Alastair Buckley, a solar expert at the University of Sheffield, said of the latest record: “I think it’s a positive sign. It’s free electricity today, for the consumer, and we should make the most of it.” He said that with solar continuing to be installed despite the government’s drastic subsidy cuts in 2016, further records will certainly be broken this summer and for years to come. Buckley said the grid could handle a far greater proportion of solar power than currently seen, because gas power stations could be ramped down. For National Grid, periods of high pressure bringing lovely weather to the UK like this week were: “really predictable, so easy to plan for,” Buckley said. Robert Gross of Imperial College said: “This doesn’t pose fundamental problem for the grid – many sunnier countries manage a similar proportion of solar on a much more regular basis.” Government statistics published on Thursday show that UK solar power capacity has grown from 11.3GW in April last year to 12.1GW this year, enough to power 3.8m homes.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

SpecTIR will provide National Grid advanced remote sensing data to support their environmental mapping, structural characterization, and for other potential uses. Aaron Cumashot, SpecTIR’s Director of Operations stated, “The award from National Grid marks an important step in SpecTIR’s continued expansion of its airborne surveying services nationally. We are excited to support National Grid and we look forward to bringing our unique spectral technology to the Northeast and to the U.S. energy sector.” SpecTIR LLC is a global remote sensing, hyperspectral analysis, and geospatial solutions company, serving domestic and foreign mining, oil/gas, defense, agricultural, and environmental industries. The company is headquartered in Reno, NV with a government solutions division in Virginia. If you would like more information, please contact Linda Milks at 775-329-6660 or email at lmilks(at)spectir(dot)com.

Loading National Grid collaborators
Loading National Grid collaborators