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News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Yares Art is pleased to present "Manuel Neri: Singularity of Form & Surface," the first solo exhibition at the gallery's New York location, featuring bronze sculptures and drawings from the noted California artist. The exhibition runs from February 23rd through April 8th, 2017, with a preview reception on Thursday, February 23rd from 5:30 to 7:30pm at Yares Art’s new location on the 4th floor at 745 Fifth Avenue, New York. An 88-page catalogue published for the exhibition is available at the gallery. Gallery owner Dennis Yares writes in the exhibition catalogue that Manuel Neri’s work “continues a Modernist figurative tradition advanced in the 20th century by such artists as Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini, yet Neri’s approach to the figure is matchless and very much his own. For Neri, the sculptural figure remains a viable and relevant vehicle capable of speaking in contemporary terms...” Neri, whose career now spans six decades, has exhibited with Yares galleries in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, New Mexico, since 1991. This is his first solo New York exhibition in ten years. Manuel Neri (b. 1930) is recognized for his life-size figurative sculptures and reliefs in plaster, bronze, and marble, their complex surfaces sanded, gouged, or painted as a means of directing the gestural thrust. The life-size bronze figures and maquettes featured in this exhibition are treated with the artist’s signature “Alborada patina,” a white painted surface layered with yellow glazes, that highlights the glow of the bronze and the sculptures’ formal and gestural essence. In Neri's work with the figure, he conveys an emotional inner state that is revealed through body language, gesture, and surface. During the past four decades, Neri has worked primarily with the same model, Mary Julia Klimenko, creating drawings and sculptures that merge contemporary sculptural concerns with classical forms. Since 1965 Neri has worked in his studio in Benicia, California; in 1981 he purchased a studio in Carrara, Italy, for working in marble. Neri initially became known in the 1960s for his association with the Bay Area Figurative movement. During the 1950s, he was a member of the artist-run cooperative Six Gallery in San Francisco where, in October 1955, he helped organize the "6 Poets at 6 Gallery" poetry reading, a landmark Beat era event where Allen Ginsberg gave the first public reading of “Howl.” In 1959, Neri was an original member of the Rat Bastard Protective Association, along with Bruce Conner, Joan Brown, Jay DeFeo, and other artists. (In the early 1960s Neri was married to painter Joan Brown, though their relationship and artistic collaboration dated back several years prior to that.) Neri taught sculpture at California School of Fine Arts (1959–65) and UC Berkeley Art Department (1963-4), and was on the art department faculty at the University of California, Davis from 1965-99. Awards include the International Sculpture Center’s 2006 Lifetime Achievement Award in Contemporary Sculpture, the 2008 Bay Area Treasure Award from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and many others. Museums holding works by Manuel Neri include the Art Institute of Chicago; Denver Art Museum; El Paso Museum of Art; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Honolulu Museum of Art; Indianapolis Museum of Art; Memphis Brooks Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Manetti Shrem Museum, Davis, California; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Nasher Gallery at Duke University; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; Oakland Museum of California; Palm Springs Art Museum; Portland Art Museum, Oregon; San Diego Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; San Jose Museum of Art; Seattle Art Museum; University Museums, Iowa State University, Ames; Whitney Museum of American Art; Yale University Art Gallery, and others. Yares Art champions primarily major Postwar Abstract Expressionist and Color Field artists and has represented the Milton Avery Estate for the past five decades. The gallery’s inaugural exhibition featured “Helen Frankenthaler and L.M.N.O.P,” with works by Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Larry Poons and was hailed by writer David Ebony as “A rarity in New York, … a concise overview of the Color Field movement of the late 1950s and ’60s, whose heroic scaled canvases and immersive, panoramic viewing experiences are little known by younger generations of artists and art-lovers.” (Nov. 26, 2016, artnet.com) Yares Art is located at 745 Fifth Avenue, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10151 (212) 256-0969. http://www.yaresart.com


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Maintenance Connection recently welcomed more than 300 attendees and integration partners to its 14th annual user group meeting, Checkpoint, in Baltimore. Maintenance Connection, the industry’s leading computerized maintenance management software (CMMS) provider, holds the annual event to provide guidance and training for users to maximize the return on their CMMS investment. Checkpoint provides Maintenance Connection customers — from early adopters to seasoned users — the chance to see new product advancements, and the opportunity to check-in with the Customer Success team. The team works with customers on a one-on-one basis to talk about how they’re using the product and ways to ensure that they maximize its benefits considering their own maintenance programs. “My favorite part of Checkpoint is the opportunity to interact with our users face to face,” Maintenance Connection Chief Customer Officer Brian Kincaid says. “We use this event as a time to celebrate our customers, and take a deeper dive into each user’s needs to expand our partnership.” This year’s user group meeting included a customer appreciation event at Baltimore’s National Aquarium. Checkpoint attendees got the chance to meet and hear from the company’s newly appointed CEO, Eric Morgan during the opening session. Attendees also had a sneak-peak of MC v8.0, Maintenance Connection’s upcoming product release set for 2017. Outside of sessions, Checkpoint attendees are given the opportunity to network at cross-industry events. At this year’s event, the largest industries represented include manufacturing, facilities, education, energy, government and healthcare. “This was the most well-planned conference I’ve ever attended,” says attendee Mike Platt of the National Gallery of Art. “Everyone on the Maintenance Connection team was extremely accommodating, helpful, courteous and knowledgeable. I want to thank them for such a great conference, product and time.” The Checkpoint seminar also provides a forum for Maintenance Connection to present two annual awards to its customers: “Client of the Year” and “User of the Year.” This year’s recipient for Client of the Year 2016 was presented to CH2M who has been using Maintenance Connection since 2005. The 2016 User of the Year was presented to Troy Lingelbach, Assistant to Director Facilities Management at Towson University. Troy has been using Maintenance Connection since 2006. Maintenance Connection plans to hold the 2017 Checkpoint event from Sept. 18-20 in Seattle. Visit the Maintenance Connection website to learn more about its CMMS software. Or, click here to learn more about the annual Checkpoint user group meeting.


Cucci C.,CNR Institute of Applied Physics Nello Carrara | Delaney J.K.,National Gallery of Art | Delaney J.K.,George Washington University | Picollo M.,CNR Institute of Applied Physics Nello Carrara
Accounts of Chemical Research | Year: 2016

ConspectusDiffuse reflectance hyperspectral imaging, or reflectance imaging spectroscopy, is a sophisticated technique that enables the capture of hundreds of images in contiguous narrow spectral bands (bandwidth < 10 nm), typically in the visible (Vis, 400-750 nm) and the near-infrared (NIR, 750-2500 nm) regions. This sequence of images provides a data set that is called an image-cube or file-cube. Two dimensions of the image-cube are the spatial dimensions of the scene, and the third dimension is the wavelength. In this way, each spatial pixel in the image has an associated reflectance spectrum. This "big data" image-cube allows for the mining of artists' materials and mapping their distribution across the surface of a work of art.Reflectance hyperspectral imaging, introduced in the 1980s by Goetz and co-workers, led to a revolution in the field of remote sensing of the earth and near planets (Goetz, F. H.; Vane, G.; Solomon, B. N.; Rock, N. Imaging Spectrometry for Earth Remote Sensing. Science, 1985, 228, 1147-1152). In the subsequent decades, thanks to rapid advances in solid-state sensor technology, reflectance hyperspectral imaging, once only available to large government laboratories, was extended to new fields of application, such as monitoring agri-foods, pharmaceutical products, the environment, and cultural heritage. In the 2000s, the potential of this noninvasive technology for the study of artworks became evident and, consequently, the methodology is becoming more widely used in the art conservation science field.Typically hyperspectral reflectance image-cubes contain millions of spectra. Many of these spectra are similar, making the reduction of the data set size an important first step. Thus, image-processing tools based on multivariate techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA), automated classification methods, or expert knowledge systems, that search for known spectral features are often applied. These algorithms seek to reduce the large number of high-quality spectra to a common subset, which allow identifying and mapping artists' materials and alteration products. Hence, reflectance hyperspectral imaging is finding its place as the starting point to find sites on polychrome surfaces for spot analytical techniques, such as X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Reflectance hyperspectral imaging can also provide image products that are a mainstay in the art conservation field, such as color-accurate images, broadband near-infrared images, and false-color products.This Account reports on the research activity carried out by two research groups, one at the "Nello Carrara" Institute of Applied Physics of the Italian National Research Council (IFAC-CNR) in Florence and the other at the National Gallery of Art (NGA) in Washington, D.C. Both groups have conducted parallel research, with frequent interchanges, to develop multispectral and hyperspectral imaging systems to study works of art. In the past decade, they have designed and experimented with some of the earliest spectral imaging prototypes for museum applications. In this Account, a brief presentation of the hyperspectral sensor systems is given with case studies showing how reflectance hyperspectral imaging is answering key questions in cultural heritage. © 2016 American Chemical Society.


Ricciardi P.,National Gallery of Art | Delaney J.K.,National Gallery of Art | Delaney J.K.,George Washington University | Facini M.,National Gallery of Art | And 4 more authors.
Angewandte Chemie - International Edition | Year: 2012

In situ analysis: Near infrared imaging spectroscopy (1000-2500 nm) is used to map the use of a fat-containing paint binder, likely egg yolk, in situ on a work of art for the first time. The identification of the use of egg tempera on a 15th century illuminated manuscript leaf (Praying Prophet by Lorenzo Monaco) sheds light on the relationship between painters and illuminators and can inform preservation decisions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Carretti E.,University of Florence | Bonini M.,University of Florence | Dei L.,University of Florence | Berrie B.H.,National Gallery of Art | And 3 more authors.
Accounts of Chemical Research | Year: 2010

The works of art and artifacts that constitute our cultural heritage are subject to deterioration, both from internal and from external factors. Surfaces that interact with the environment are the most prone to aging and decay; accordingly, soiling is a prime factor in the degradation of surfaces and the attendant disfigurement of a piece. Coatings that were originally intended to protect or contribute aesthetically to an artwork should be removed if they begin to have a destructive impact on its appearance or surface chemistry. Since the mid-19th century, organic solvents have been the method of choice for cleaning painted surfaces and removing degraded coatings. Care must be taken to choose a solvent mixture that minimizes swelling of or leaching from the original paint films, which would damage and compromise the physical integrity of all the layers of paint. The use of gels and poultices, first advocated in the 1980s, helps by localizing the solvent and, in some cases, by reducing solvent permeation into underlying paint layers. Unfortunately, it is not always easy to remove gels and their residues from a paint surface. In this Account, we address the removal problem by examining the properties of three classes of innovative gels for use on artwork-rheoreversible gels, magnetic gels, and "peelable" gels. Their rheological properties and efficacies for treating the surfaces of works have been studied, demonstrating uniquely useful characteristics in each class: Rheoreversible gels become free-flowing on application of a chemical or thermal "switch". For art conservation, a chemical trigger is preferred. Stable gels formed by bubbling CO2 through solutions of polyallylamine or polyethylenimines (thereby producing ammonium carbamates, which act as chain cross-links) can be prepared with a wide range of solvent mixtures. After solubilization of varnish and dirt, addition of a weak acid (mineral or organic) displaces the CO2, and the resulting free-flowing liquid can be removed gently. Incorporation of magnetic, coated-ferrite nanoparticles into polyacrylamide gels adds functionality to a versatile system comprising oil-in-water microemulsions, aqueous micellar solutions, or xerogels that act as sponges. The ferrite particles allow the use of magnets both to place the gels precisely on a surface and to lift them from it after cleaning. Novel formulations of poly(vinyl alcohol)-borate gels, which accept a range of organic cosolvents, show promise for swelling and dissolving organic coatings. This family of gels can be quite stiff but can be spread. They are non-sticky and have sufficient strength to be removed by peeling or lifting them from a sensitive surface. These three classes of gels are potentially very important soft materials to augment and improve the range of options available for conserving cultural heritage, and their interesting chemical-physical properties open a rich area for future scientific investigation. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


News Article | October 18, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WASHINGTON, Oct. 18, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The U.S. Postal Service dedicated a Christmas stamp today featuring the Florentine Madonna and Child, from a 15th-century tempera-on-panel painting in the Widener Collection at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. The ceremony took place at the Smithsonian National Postal Museum. The painting is dated to circa 1470, and its anonymous artist is known only as "a Follower of Fra Filippo Lippi and Pesellino." The public is invited to share the news using the hashtag #ChristmasStamps. "With the holidays right around the corner, this stamp, based on a beautiful portrait as part of the National Gallery of Art's collection, is perfect for extending Christmas greetings to family, friends and loved ones," said U.S. Postal Service Capital Metro Area Vice President of Operations Linda Malone. Joining Malone in the dedication ceremony were National Gallery of Art Associate Curator for Italian and Spanish Paintings Gretchen Hirschauer; Editor-in-Chief of Italian America Miles Fisher; U.S. Postal Service Chief Human Resources Officer and Executive Vice President Jeffrey Williamson; and Smithsonian National Postal Museum Director Allen Kane. Voice of America "International Edition" Host Lori Lundin served as master of ceremonies. "The Florentine Madonna and Child represents not only the Italian Renaissance, but also the importance of the arts in all of western civilization," said Fisher. "This emphasis was later brought to the United States by many immigrant groups — including Italians — each in their own way."   Art historians have long sought to identify the artist who created this painting. Early in the 20th century, the painting was attributed to the Florentine artist Pier Francesco Fiorentino, but not long after, the painting was seen as the work of an anonymous artist who had created a large number of paintings in the same style.   Although some museums still refer to the artist as "Pseudo-Pier Francesco Fiorentino," scholars have recently taken a different approach and concluded that the artist was heavily influenced by two prominent 15th-century Florentine artists, Fra Filippo Lippi and Francesco Pesellino. The painting on this stamp is believed to be based on a Pesellino painting, now in the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon in France, which shows a very similar Madonna and Child against a different background. For that reason, the National Gallery of Art refers to the artist as "a Follower of Fra Filippo Lippi and Pesellino."   Clad with a white veil over her head and a red garment and blue cloak, both trimmed in gold, a haloed Virgin Mary gazes downward and to the right, looking at a blond, haloed Christ child while placing her right hand on his shoulder. The Christ child looks directly at the viewer. The position of the thumb and forefinger of his left hand suggests to some art historians that the painter may have intended to show him holding a symbolic object, although the painting in France believed to be its source shows the Christ child making the same gesture.   Behind both of them is a hedge of pink and white roses, with blue sky visible through thorny, leafy stalks.   Similar paintings, presumably by the same artist or workshop, are in the collections of many museums in other cities, including Baltimore, Philadelphia and London. Art historians have speculated that the painter may have had preparatory drawings or close copies of the works of the masters he imitated, and that a relationship may have existed between the workshops of those artists and this anonymous painter.   The Postal Service is issuing this stamp as a Forever stamp in a booklet of 20. Forever stamps are always equal in value to the current First-Class Mail 1-ounce price.   When referring to the Madonna and Child painting, use the following credit line: "National Gallery of Art, Widener Collection."   Ordering First-Day-of-Issue Postmarks Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at local Post Offices, at The Postal Store website at usps.com⁄shop, or by calling 800-782-6724. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes to themselves or others, and place them in a larger envelope addressed to:   Florentine Madonna and Child Christmas Stamp Stamp Fulfillment Services Cancellation Services 8300 NE Underground Drive, Pillar 210 Kansas City, MO 64144-9998   The Postal Service will apply the first-day-of-issue postmark and return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark up to a quantity of 50. There is a 5-cent charge for each additional postmark over 50. All orders must be postmarked by Dec. 18, 2016.   Ordering First-Day Covers The Postal Service also offers first-day covers for new stamp issues and Postal Service stationery items postmarked with the official first-day-of-issue cancellation. Each item has an individual catalog number and is offered in the quarterly USA Philatelic catalog, online at usps.com⁄shop, or by calling 800-782-6724. Customers may request a free catalog by calling 800-782-6724 or writing to:   U.S. Postal Service Catalog Request PO Box 219014 Kansas City, MO 64121-9014   Visit this link for information on upcoming stamp events.   The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.   Please Note: For broadcast quality video and audio, photo stills and other media resources, visit the USPS Newsroom.   Reporters interested in speaking with regional Postal Service public relations professionals should visit this link.   Follow us on twitter.com/USPS and like us at facebook.com/USPS. For more information about the Postal Service, visit usps.com and usps.com/postalfacts. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=41689


Lomax S.Q.,National Gallery of Art
Journal of Coatings Technology Research | Year: 2010

Over 50 commercial paints were examined by x-ray powder diffraction in order to try and identify the synthetic organic pigments present. The binders included acrylic, oil, gum, and alkyd. Some pigments could be identified, though analysis is often complicated by the presence of large amounts of fillers and extenders in the paints relative to the small quantities of the pigment. A few of the paints did not have reflections due to fillers or extenders but the pigments could still not be identified. The best success in identifying the pigments was with acrylic binders, where the pigments could be identified in more than half of the samples examined, and with alkyds, where the pigment could frequently be identified. However, other binders, especially oil and gum, contain so many fillers that the pigment reflections are obscured. X-ray powder diffraction, therefore, is of limited utility in the identification of synthetic organic pigments in paints. © FSCT and OCCA 2009.


Lomax S.Q.,National Gallery of Art
Journal of Coatings Technology Research | Year: 2010

This paper presents x-ray powder diffraction data for over 200 synthetic organic pigments. These pigments, most manufactured in the last 130 years, are frequently found in modern works of art. Their identification is of interest in the field of art conservation for the purposes of dating works of art as well as making conservators and curators aware of issues with lightfastness and solubility. Most classes of these pigments, including β-naphthol, Naphthol AS, mono-and di-arylide yellows, quinacridones, copper phthalocyanines, benzimidazolones, and perylenes give good diffraction data. Some pigments, including certain triarylcarbonium and some other metal containing pigments, especially aluminum containing pigments, were found not to diffract. X-ray powder diffraction is of great use in distinguishing polymorphs of pigments such as quinacridones and copper phthalocyanines. © FSCT and OCCA 2009.


Berrie B.H.,National Gallery of Art
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2012

Following a brief overview of the history of analysis of artists' pigments, I discuss the illustrative example of lead-tin yellow. Recent advances in our knowledge of artists' use of red lakes, glassy pigments, and metallic pigments in works of cultural heritage, particularly European paintings, as determined from chemical analyses are described. Copyright © 2012 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Berrie B.H.,National Gallery of Art
Early Science and Medicine | Year: 2015

In the sixteenth century, the Erzgebirge mountains were mined for mineral ores of cobalt and antimony that were used to make the blue pigment smalt, a potash glass, and yellow pigments based on lead-antimony oxides, respectively. By the beginning of the seventeenth century, these pigments had found a permanent place on the easel painter's palette, smalt used in place of ultramarine and the antimonial compounds enlivening the yellows of the spectrum. Mining efforts also located sources for naphtha, and improvements in distillation would have allowed it (and other solvents) to be fractioned and purified for use as a solvent and diluent for oil paint. The mention of naphtha in treatises and color-sellers' inventories attests to its use in color making. Thinning paint allowed artists to use glazes of paint to lively, luminous, coloristic effect and made blending easier. These three discoveries contributed to the saturated colors characteristic of seventeenth-century painting and offered artists latitude in the ways they pursued their goal of imitative painting. © 2015 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.

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