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Jones K.B.,University of California at San Francisco | Goodwin A.F.,University of California at San Francisco | Landan M.,University of California at San Francisco | Seidel K.,University of California at San Francisco | And 10 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2013

Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia (ED), which encompasses a large group of syndromes that share several phenotypic features such as missing or malformed ectodermal structures, including skin, hair, sweat glands, and teeth. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XL-HED) is associated with mutations in ectodysplasin (EDA1). Hypohidrosis due to hypoplastic sweat glands and thin, sparse hair are phenotypic features that significantly affect the daily lives of XL-HED individuals and therefore require systematic analysis. We sought to determine the quality of life of individuals with XL-HED and to quantify sweat duct and hair phenotypes using confocal imaging, pilocarpine iontophoresis, and phototrichogram analysis. Using these highly sensitive and non-invasive techniques, we demonstrated that 11/12 XL-HED individuals presented with a complete absence of sweat ducts and that none produced sweat. We determined that the thin hair phenotype observed in XL-HED was due to multiple factors, such as fewer terminal hairs with decreased thickness and slower growth rate, as well as fewer follicular units and fewer hairs per unit. The precise characterization of XL-HED phenotypes using sensitive and non-invasive techniques presented in our study will improve upon larger genotype-phenotype studies and the assessment of future therapies in XL-HED. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Fete T.J.,University of Missouri | Fete M.,National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2016

The International Research Symposium on Goltz Syndrome was held at Texas Children's Hospital on July 22 and 23, 2013. This unique research, educational, and family-oriented symposium was sponsored by the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital. Goltz syndrome, or Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), is a highly variable X-linked dominant disorder with abnormalities in tissues derived from the ectoderm and mesoderm. Classic clinical features include patchy hypoplastic skin, split hand/foot deformities, and ocular manifestations. FDH is caused by PORCN gene mutations. PORCN is involved in the secretion and signaling of Wnt proteins, which play a role in embryonic tissue development. The purpose of the International Research Symposium on Goltz Syndrome was to review the progress that has been made in recent years in research related to this rare disorder and to explore potential future research directions and treatments. This issue of American Journal of Medical Genetics contains the research findings from the evaluations from multiple subspecialties. There is a recommendation for a new diagnostic guideline to aid clinicians in identifying individuals with Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. A tissue repository has been instituted at Texas Children's Hospital, to aid future researchers in this area. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Fete T.J.,Columbia University | Fete M.,National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics | Year: 2016

The International Research Symposium on Goltz Syndrome was held at Texas Children's Hospital on July 22 and 23, 2013. This unique research, educational, and family-oriented symposium was sponsored by the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital. Goltz syndrome, or Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), is a highly variable X-linked dominant disorder with abnormalities in tissues derived from the ectoderm and mesoderm. Classic clinical features include patchy hypoplastic skin, split hand/foot deformities, and ocular manifestations. FDH is caused by PORCN gene mutations. PORCN is involved in the secretion and signaling of Wnt proteins, which play a role in embryonic tissue development. The purpose of the International Research Symposium on Goltz Syndrome was to review the progress that has been made in recent years in research related to this rare disorder and to explore potential future research directions and treatments. This issue of American Journal of Medical Genetics contains the research findings from the evaluations from multiple subspecialties. There is a recommendation for a new diagnostic guideline to aid clinicians in identifying individuals with Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. A tissue repository has been instituted at Texas Children's Hospital, to aid future researchers in this area. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Salinas C.F.,Medical University of South Carolina | Irvine A.D.,National Childrens Research Center and Paediatric Dermatology | Itin P.H.,University of Basel | Di Giovanna J.J.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | And 3 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2014

Ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) comprise a large clinically and etiologically heterogeneous group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormalities in tissues derived from the embryonic ectoderm. Controversy exists over which syndromes should be classified as EDs and which should be excluded from the classification. The challenge will be to balance comprehensiveness within the classification with usability and accessibility so that the benefits truly serve the needs of researchers, health-care providers, and ultimately the individuals and families directly affected by EDs. The overarching goal of the Second International Conference was to develop a consensus on EDs classifications, with the ultimate goal of creating a system that integrates clinical and molecular knowledge, using an interactive Internet-based database that clinicians, researchers, and laymen can use. The Conference, brought together a group of experts from around the world, including a diverse health-care providers, researchers, patient advocate representatives, and administrators. The Conference was modeled after the 2008 conference, with plenary sessions, scientific updates, and small group discussions. Based on the present clinical knowledge, new molecular advances and both coupled with new bioinformatics developments, the participants agree to develop amultiaxis system approach for the classification of EDs. The multiaxis approach will include a clinical/phenotype axis, a genebased axis, and a functional/pathways axis. The significance of the conference outcomes includes, a new classification approach that will foster a better understanding of EDs, open new fields of research and develop a nosologic approach that may have broad implications for classifying other hereditary conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Maxim R.A.,Saint Louis University | Zinner S.H.,University of Washington | Matsuo H.,Saint Louis University | Prosser T.M.,Texas Christian University | And 3 more authors.
The Scientific World Journal | Year: 2012

Objective. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is an X-linked hereditary disorder characterized by hypohidrosis, hypotrichosis, and anomalous dentition. Estimates of up to 50 of affected children having intellectual disability are controversial. Method. In a cross-sectional study, 45 youth with HED (77 males, mean age 9.75 years) and 59 matched unaffected controls (70 males, mean age 9.79 years) were administered the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test and the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement, and their parents completed standardized neurodevelopmental and behavioral measures, educational, and health-related information regarding their child, as well as standardized and nonstandardized data regarding socioeconomic information for their family. Results. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in intelligence quotient composite and educational achievement scores, suggesting absence of learning disability in either group. No gender differences within or between groups were found on any performance measures. Among affected youth, parental education level correlated positively with (1) cognitive vocabulary scores and cognitive composite scores; (2) educational achievement for mathematics, reading, and composite scores. Conclusion. Youth affected with HED and unaffected matched peers have similar profiles on standardized measures of cognition, educational achievement, and adaptive functioning although children with HED may be at increased risk for ADHD. © 2012 Rolanda A. Maxim et al. Source

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