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Rani S.,National Forensic Mental Health Service | Brennan M.,The College of Nursing and Midwifery | Timmons D.,National Forensic Mental Health Service
Journal of Forensic Nursing | Year: 2010

The ever-changing demands of recruitment and retention, both nationally and at a local level, have resulted in many staff with little or no experience in managing a unit in a secure setting. This study aimed to elicit the views of a cross-section of unit-based staff and middle management, on their experiences of leadership and taking charge of a shift/unit. A qualitative descriptive design was adapted for this study. The data were collected using focus group interviews guided by semistructured interview schedules. Twenty-one subjects participated in three focus groups. The data were analyzed using Colaizzi's (1978) framework. Five themes emerged from the data analysis. These are: Perceived practical skills deficit, perceived difference in experience, training program, leadership skills, and teaching learning methods. Implications: The themes generated will provide a framework to develop a training program, which will prepare staff to take on a leadership role within a unit, if required. ©2010 International Association of Forensic Nurses.


Gill P.,National Forensic Mental Health Service | McKenna P.,National Forensic Mental Health Service | O'Neill H.,National Forensic Mental Health Service | Thompson J.,National Forensic Mental Health Service | Timmons D.,National Forensic Mental Health Service
British Journal of Forensic Practice | Year: 2010

The Central Mental Hospital in Ireland is one of the oldest forensic mental health units in Europe. The hospital is currently in the process of transforming from a single inpatient site to a modern national forensic mental health service. Central to this transformation is the need to move from the traditional security-focused model of care to a model of recovery. The challenge incumbent within this transformation is to incorporate a sophisticated amalgamation of the patients' needs while recognising the broad range of security requirements in a forensic setting. This paper considered that adopting an integrated care pathway (ICP) approach would provide the service with a vehicle to re-engineer our principles and systems of care. Likewise we hypothesised that the ICP would enable us to consolidate best practices such as multidisciplinary working, structured professional judgement and the involvement of the patient and their carers. Thus far it has afforded us the opportunity to examine many aspects of the care delivered within the service. It has provided a shared understanding of key standards among clinicians, service users and carers that are necessary to implement a quality care pathway. It has certainly not been a stagnant process, and the initial work often bears no resemblance to the current process. In turn, we expect that it will continue to change as the path travelled is as important as the outcome and the ICP becomes a dynamic part of the organisation. © Pier Professional Ltd.


PubMed | National Forensic Mental Health Service
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of forensic nursing | Year: 2010

The ever-changing demands of recruitment and retention, both nationally and at a local level, have resulted in many staff with little or no experience in managing a unit in a secure setting. This study aimed to elicit the views of a cross-section of unit-based staff and middle management, on their experiences of leadership and taking charge of a shift/unit. A qualitative descriptive design was adapted for this study. The data were collected using focus group interviews guided by semistructured interview schedules. Twenty-one subjects participated in three focus groups. The data were analyzed using Colaizzis (1978) framework. Five themes emerged from the data analysis. These are: Perceived practical skills deficit, perceived difference in experience, training program, leadership skills, and teaching learning methods.The themes generated will provide a framework to develop a training program, which will prepare staff to take on a leadership role within a unit, if required.


PubMed | National Forensic Mental Health Service
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursing | Year: 2010

The Central Mental Hospital is one of the oldest high secure mental health services in Europe dating back to 1845 but has been one of the last to introduce (forensic) psychiatric nurses. This paper describes the role of psychiatric nurses working in this high secure psychiatric facility in Ireland. The United Kingdom Central Council competency framework was considered to be a prudent starting point for beginning to understand this role in an Irish context. The study received a response rate of 74% and found that the Irish Forensic Mental Health Nurse experiences many of the same challenges as their international colleagues. A high proportion of nursing practice is focused on assessment, communication and creating a therapeutic environment based very much in keeping with the mainstream role in mental health nursing. Skills in specialist assessments and addressing offending behaviour were considered important but deficient at that time. The importance of recovery and human rights were considered paramount but challenged by the need for risk management and security.

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