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Hanson J.D.,Texas Tech University | Utrera A.,National Experimental University of the Western Plains | Fulhorst C.F.,University of Texas Medical Branch
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases | Year: 2011

Choclo virus (CHOV) and Maporal virus (MAPV) are enzootic in Panama and western Venezuela, respectively. The results of previous studies suggested that the fulvous pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys fulvescens) is the principal host of both viruses. The results of an analysis of nucleotide sequence data in this study indicated that the rodent associated with CHOV is the Costa Rican pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys costaricensis) and that the rodent associated with MAPV is the delicate pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys delicatus). As such, MAPV is ecologically distinct from CHOV and should be considered a species separate from CHOV. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Source


Dorr L.J.,Smithsonian Institution | Stergios B.,National Experimental University of the Western Plains
PhytoKeys | Year: 2014

Four new species of Pilea (Urticaceae) from the Andes of Venezuela are described and illustrated: Pilea matthewii sp. nov., P. miguelii sp. nov., P. nicholasii sp. nov., and P. nidiae sp. nov. The affinities of these species and their positions within the informal classifications of Pilea proposed by Weddell and Killip are discussed. Notes on other species of Pilea found in Venezuela also are presented. © Laurence J. Dorr, Basil Stergios. Source


Pastore J.F.B.,State University of Feira de Santana | Cardoso D.B.O.S.,State University of Feira de Santana | Aymard C. G.A.,National Experimental University of the Western Plains
Novon | Year: 2010

A synopsis of the American genus Acanthocladus Klotzsch ex Hassk. (Polygalaceae), based primarily on herbarium studies, is presented, along with an identification key to the currently accepted eight species. Two new synonyms and the following new combinations are presented: A. dukei (Barringer) J. F. B. Pastore & D. B. O. S. Cardoso, A. pulcherrimus (Kuhlm.) J. F. B. Pastore & D. B. O. S. Cardoso, and A. santosii (Wurdack) J. F. B. Pastore & D. B. O. S. Cardoso. The names A. brasiliensis Klotzsch ex Hassk. and A. pulcherrimus are lectotypified. © 2010 Missouri Botanical Garden. Source


Lasso C.A.,Institute Investigacion Of Recursos Biologicos Alexander Von Humboldt | Machado-Allison A.,Central University of Venezuela | Taphorn D.C.,National Experimental University of the Western Plains
Journal of Fish Biology | Year: 2016

About 1000 freshwater fishes have been found so far in the Orinoco River Basin of Venezuela and Colombia. This high ichthyological diversity reflects the wide range of landscapes and aquatic ecosystems included in the basin. Mountain streams descend from the high Andes to become rapid-flowing foothill rivers that burst out upon vast savannah flatlands where they slowly make their way to the sea. These white-water rivers are heavily laden with sediments from the geologically young Andes. Because their sediment deposits have formed the richest soils of the basin, they have attracted the highest density of human populations, along with the greatest levels of deforestation, wildfires, agricultural biocides and fertilizers, sewage and all the other impacts associated with urban centres, agriculture and cattle ranching. In the southern portion of the basin, human populations are much smaller, where often the only inhabitants are indigenous peoples. The ancient rocks and sands of the Guiana Shield yield clear and black water streams of very different quality. Here, sediment loads are miniscule, pH is very acid and fish biomass is only a fraction of that observed in the rich Andean tributaries to the north. For each region of the basin, the current state of knowledge about fish diversity is assessed, fish sampling density evaluated, the presence of endemic species and economically important species (for human consumption or ornamental purposes) described and gaps in knowledge are pointed out. Current trends in the fishery for human consumption are analysed, noting that stocks of many species are in steep decline, and that current fishing practices are not sustainable. Finally, the major impacts and threats faced by the fishes and aquatic ecosystems of the Orinoco River Basin are summarized, and the creation of bi-national commissions to promote standardized fishing laws in both countries is recommended. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles Source


Lasso C.A.,Institute Investigacion Of Recursos Biologicos Alexander Von Humboldt Calle 28 A And 15 09 Bogota Colombia | Machado-Allison A.,Central University of Venezuela | Taphorn D.C.,National Experimental University of the Western Plains
Journal of Fish Biology | Year: 2016

About 1000 freshwater fishes have been found so far in the Orinoco River Basin of Venezuela and Colombia. This high ichthyological diversity reflects the wide range of landscapes and aquatic ecosystems included in the basin. Mountain streams descend from the high Andes to become rapid-flowing foothill rivers that burst out upon vast savannah flatlands where they slowly make their way to the sea. These white-water rivers are heavily laden with sediments from the geologically young Andes. Because their sediment deposits have formed the richest soils of the basin, they have attracted the highest density of human populations, along with the greatest levels of deforestation, wildfires, agricultural biocides and fertilizers, sewage and all the other impacts associated with urban centres, agriculture and cattle ranching. In the southern portion of the basin, human populations are much smaller, where often the only inhabitants are indigenous peoples. The ancient rocks and sands of the Guiana Shield yield clear and black water streams of very different quality. Here, sediment loads are miniscule, pH is very acid and fish biomass is only a fraction of that observed in the rich Andean tributaries to the north. For each region of the basin, the current state of knowledge about fish diversity is assessed, fish sampling density evaluated, the presence of endemic species and economically important species (for human consumption or ornamental purposes) described and gaps in knowledge are pointed out. Current trends in the fishery for human consumption are analysed, noting that stocks of many species are in steep decline, and that current fishing practices are not sustainable. Finally, the major impacts and threats faced by the fishes and aquatic ecosystems of the Orinoco River Basin are summarized, and the creation of bi-national commissions to promote standardized fishing laws in both countries is recommended. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Source

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