National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables

Beijing, China

National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables

Beijing, China

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Gao C.,China Agricultural University | Ju Z.,China Agricultural University | Li S.,China Agricultural University | Zuo J.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Integrative Plant Biology | Year: 2013

Genotype is generally determined by the co-expression of diverse genes and multiple regulatory pathways in plants. Gene co-expression analysis combining with physiological trait data provides very important information about the gene function and regulatory mechanism. L-Ascorbic acid (AsA), which is an essential nutrient component for human health and plant metabolism, plays key roles in diverse biological processes such as cell cycle, cell expansion, stress resistance, hormone synthesis, and signaling. Here, we applied a weighted gene correlation network analysis approach based on gene expression values and AsA content data in ripening tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit with different AsA content levels, which leads to identification of AsA relevant modules and vital genes in AsA regulatory pathways. Twenty-four modules were compartmentalized according to gene expression profiling. Among these modules, one negatively related module containing genes involved in redox processes and one positively related module enriched with genes involved in AsA biosynthetic and recycling pathways were further analyzed. The present work herein indicates that redox pathways as well as hormone-signal pathways are closely correlated with AsA accumulation in ripening tomato fruit, and allowed us to prioritize candidate genes for follow-up studies to dissect this interplay at the biochemical and molecular level. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.


He X.,China Agricultural University | He H.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Fan Z.,China Agricultural University | Zhao X.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables
Journal of Chinese Institute of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2013

The effect of three domestic cooking methods (boiling, micro waving, steaming of different time duration) on the changes in glucosinolates (GS) in three cruciferous vegetables (baby Chinese cabbage, cabbage mustard, Chinese kale) was investigated with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The GS contents in Chinese kale and cabbage mustard was approximately four times of that in baby Chinese cabbage, while the composition of GS is varied among the three vegetables. The retention of total GS showed a clear tendency of decrease, with retention rates of GS of 42.5%, 38.5% and 70.0% in baby Chinese cabbage, cabbage mustard and Chinese kale, respectively, after 2 min treatment. The GS content retentions of the three cruciferous vegetables are all above 98% at 3 min treatment under steaming.


Guo S.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Guo S.,Cornell University | Zheng Y.,Cornell University | Zheng Y.,China Agricultural University | And 9 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2010

Background: Cucumber, Cucumis sativus L., is an economically and nutritionally important crop of the Cucurbitaceae family and has long served as a primary model system for sex determination studies. Recently, the sequencing of its whole genome has been completed. However, transcriptome information of this species is still scarce, with a total of around 8,000 Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) and mRNA sequences currently available in GenBank. In order to gain more insights into molecular mechanisms of plant sex determination and provide the community a functional genomics resource that will facilitate cucurbit research and breeding, we performed transcriptome sequencing of cucumber flower buds of two near-isogenic lines, WI1983G, a gynoecious plant which bears only pistillate flowers, and WI1983H, a hermaphroditic plant which bears only bisexual flowers.Result: Using Roche-454 massive parallel pyrosequencing technology, we generated a total of 353,941 high quality EST sequences with an average length of 175bp, among which 188,255 were from gynoecious flowers and 165,686 from hermaphroditic flowers. These EST sequences, together with ~5,600 high quality cucumber EST and mRNA sequences available in GenBank, were clustered and assembled into 81,401 unigenes, of which 28,452 were contigs and 52,949 were singletons. The unigenes and ESTs were further mapped to the cucumber genome and more than 500 alternative splicing events were identified in 443 cucumber genes. The unigenes were further functionally annotated by comparing their sequences to different protein and functional domain databases and assigned with Gene Ontology (GO) terms. A biochemical pathway database containing 343 predicted pathways was also created based on the annotations of the unigenes. Digital expression analysis identified ~200 differentially expressed genes between flowers of WI1983G and WI1983H and provided novel insights into molecular mechanisms of plant sex determination process. Furthermore, a set of SSR motifs and high confidence SNPs between WI1983G and WI1983H were identified from the ESTs, which provided the material basis for future genetic linkage and QTL analysis.Conclusion: A large set of EST sequences were generated from cucumber flower buds of two different sex types. Differentially expressed genes between these two different sex-type flowers, as well as putative SSR and SNP markers, were identified. These EST sequences provide valuable information to further understand molecular mechanisms of plant sex determination process and forms a rich resource for future functional genomics analysis, marker development and cucumber breeding. © 2010 Guo et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


He X.,China Agricultural University | He H.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Fan Z.,China Agricultural University | Wang R.,China Agricultural University | Wang L.,China Agricultural University
Journal of Chinese Institute of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2016

Objective: To study the effect of three domestic preparation methods on nutrient contents in three cruciferae leafy vegetables. Method: Determining the contents of carotenoids, flavonoids and minerals in baby Chinese cabbage, cabbage mustard and Chinese kale samples after blanching, microwaving and steaming treatments. Results: The flavonoid content of baby Chinese cabbage significant decreased 53.1% after blanching, but increased after microwaving. The loss of carotenoids was negligible after steaming while as large as almost 50% after microwaved for 5min. Conclusion: Steaming is the most recommended of the three cooking treatment. Blanching cause serious loss of flavonoids while microwaving reduced carotenoids content significantly. © 2016, Editorial Office of Journal of CIFST. All right reserved.


PubMed | Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables and China Agricultural University
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] is an important vegetable crop world-wide. Watermelon fruit quality is a complex trait determined by various factors such as sugar content, flesh color and flesh texture. Fruit quality and developmental process of cultivated and wild watermelon are highly different. To systematically understand the molecular basis of these differences, we compared transcriptome profiles of fruit tissues of cultivated watermelon 97103 and wild watermelon PI296341-FR. We identified 2,452, 826 and 322 differentially expressed genes in cultivated flesh, cultivated mesocarp and wild flesh, respectively, during fruit development. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of these genes indicated that biological processes and metabolic pathways related to fruit quality such as sweetness and flavor were significantly changed only in the flesh of 97103 during fruit development, while those related to abiotic stress response were changed mainly in the flesh of PI296341-FR. Our comparative transcriptome profiling analysis identified critical genes potentially involved in controlling fruit quality traits including -galactosidase, invertase, UDP-galactose/glucose pyrophosphorylase and sugar transporter genes involved in the determination of fruit sugar content, phytoene synthase, -carotene hydroxylase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase genes involved in carotenoid metabolism, and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase, cellulose synthase, pectinesterase, pectinesterase inhibitor, polygalacturonase inhibitor and -mannosidase genes involved in the regulation of flesh texture. In addition, we found that genes in the ethylene biosynthesis and signaling pathway including ACC oxidase, ethylene receptor and ethylene responsive factor showed highly ripening-associated expression patterns, indicating a possible role of ethylene in fruit development and ripening of watermelon, a non-climacteric fruit. Our analysis provides novel insights into watermelon fruit quality and ripening biology. Furthermore, the comparative expression profile data we developed provides a valuable resource to accelerate functional studies in watermelon and facilitate watermelon crop improvement.


Lu G.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Lu G.,Agricultural University of Hebei | Guo S.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Zhang H.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | And 5 more authors.
European Journal of Plant Pathology | Year: 2011

Transcriptome profiling of watermelon during its incompatible interactions with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON) was performed using an Agilent custom microarray, which contains 15,000 probes representing approximately 8,200 watermelon genes. A total of 24, 275, 596, 598, and 592 genes showed significant differential expression in FON-infected plant roots, as compared with mock-inoculated roots, at 0.5, 1, 3, 5 and 8 days post inoculation (dpi), respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of these differentially expressed genes revealed that during the incompatible interaction between watermelon and FON, the expression of a number of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, transcription factors, signalling/regulatory genes, and cell wall modification genes, was significantly induced. A number of genes for transporter proteins such as aquaporins were down-regulated, indicating that transporter proteins might contribute to the development of wilt symptoms after FON infection. In the incompatible interaction, most genes involved in biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) were expressed stronger and more sustained than those in a compatible interaction in FON-infected tissues. Similarly, genes associated with shikimate-phenylpropanoid-lignin biosynthesis were also induced during the incompatible interaction, but expression of these genes were not changed or repressed in the compatible interaction. Those results demonstrate that JA biosynthesis and shikimate-phenylpropanoid-lignin pathways might play important roles in watermelon against FON infection and thus provides new insights in understanding the molecular basis and signalling network in watermelon plants in response to FON infection. We also performed confocal imaging of watermelon roots infected with the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged FON1 to revealed histological characteristics of the infection. © 2011 KNPV.


Ren Y.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Zhao H.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Kou Q.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Kou Q.,Capital Normal University | And 10 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence and map the watermelon (Citrullus spp.) genome, we have constructed a high density genetic linkage map. The map positioned 234 watermelon genome sequence scaffolds (an average size of 1.41 Mb) that cover about 330 Mb and account for 93.5% of the 353 Mb of the assembled genomic sequences of the elite Chinese watermelon line 97103 (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus). The genetic map was constructed using an F8 population of 103 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). The RILs are derived from a cross between the line 97103 and the United States Plant Introduction (PI) 296341-FR (C. lanatus var. citroides) that contains resistance to fusarium wilt (races 0, 1, and 2). The genetic map consists of eleven linkage groups that include 698 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 219 insertion-deletion (InDel) and 36 structure variation (SV) markers and spans ~800 cM with a mean marker interval of 0.8 cM. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 11 BACs that produced chromosome-specifc signals, we have depicted watermelon chromosomes that correspond to the eleven linkage groups constructed in this study. The high resolution genetic map developed here should be a useful platform for the assembly of the watermelon genome, for the development of sequence-based markers used in breeding programs, and for the identification of genes associated with important agricultural traits. © 2012 Ren et al.


Zhang X.,Beijing Institute of Technology | Zhang J.,Beijing Institute of Technology | Zhang Y.,Beijing Institute of Technology | Xin Y.,CAS Institute of Microbiology | He H.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables
International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology | Year: 2013

A novel actinomycete, strain W6T, was isolated from a soil sample of Yunnan Province, China. The bacterium was aerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming and Gram-stain-positive. Genetic, phenotypic and chemical properties of the isolate were studied. 16S rRNA gene sequence data suggested that the novel isolate belonged to the genus Friedmanniella and shared 98.6 % sequence similarity with Friedmanniella antarctica DSM 11053T and Friedmanniella okinawensis DSM 21744T, the most closely related species. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained LL-diaminopimelic acid, and mycolic acids were absent. The main menaquinone was MK-9(H4) and the predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C15:0. The phospholipid profile contained phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylcholine and diphosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain W6T was 72 mol%. Strain W6T showed 30.0 % and 28.5 % DNA-DNA relatedness, respectively, to F. antarctica DSM 11053T and F. okinawensis DSM 21744T. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data showed that strain W6T should be assigned to the genus Friedmanniella as a representative of a novel species, for which the name Friedmanniella flava sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is W6T (= CGMCC 4.6856T = JCM 17701T). © 2013 IUMS.


He H.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables | Ping L.,Wageningen University | Bonnema G.,Wageningen University | Dekker M.,Wageningen University | Verkerk R.,National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2012

Glucosinolates (GSs) were analyzed in 56 accessions of Brassica rapa grown in the greenhouse. Eight different glucosinolates were identified in the Brassica rapa group. They are the aliphatic glucosinolates progoitrin (PRO), gluconapin (NAP), glucobrassicanapin (GBN), the indolyl glucosinolates 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin (4OH), glucobrassicin (GBC), 4-methoxyglucobrassicin (4ME), neoglucobrassicin (NEO) and the aromatic glucosinolate gluconasturtiin (NAS). Gluconapin, glucobrassicanapin, progoitrin and gluconasturtiin are the most abundant GSs in the Brassica rapa, but there is considerable variation in content among accessions. The total glucosinolate contents in Brassica rapa group varied substantially between the different accessions. The highest amount of GSs (361 μmol/100 g FW) was observed in leaves of vegetable turnip, followed by rapid cycling and yellow sarson, with the amount of 200 and 178 μmol/100 g FW respectively. Whereas the lowest GSs content was found in turnip greens (20.8 μmol/100 g FW) and Wutacai (22.6 μmol/100 g FW). The total aliphatic GSs proportion varied from 50 to 90% of the total GS, while generally the content of indolyl glucosinoloates, especially 4OH glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin is low. Gluconasturtiin was found in relatively high concentrations in komastsuna (14.6 μmol/100 g FW), yellow sarson (7.1 μmol/ 100 g FW) and constitutes as much as 24% of the total amount of glucosinolates. Relatively high amounts of gluconapin (281 μmol/100 g FW) and glucobrassicanapin (60.0 μmol/100 g FW) were observed in the leaves of vegetable turnip. Compared with the Brassica oleracea group, Brassica rapa lacks glucoraphanin and sinigrin but contains gluconapin and glucobrassicanapin. Variations in glucosinolate content among genotypes suggest differences in their health-promoting properties and the opportunity for enhancement of their levels through breeding or genetic modification.


PubMed | National Engineering Research Center for Vegetables
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2012

As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence and map the watermelon (Citrullus spp.) genome, we have constructed a high density genetic linkage map. The map positioned 234 watermelon genome sequence scaffolds (an average size of 1.41 Mb) that cover about 330 Mb and account for 93.5% of the 353 Mb of the assembled genomic sequences of the elite Chinese watermelon line 97103 (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus). The genetic map was constructed using an F(8) population of 103 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). The RILs are derived from a cross between the line 97103 and the United States Plant Introduction (PI) 296341-FR (C. lanatus var. citroides) that contains resistance to fusarium wilt (races 0, 1, and 2). The genetic map consists of eleven linkage groups that include 698 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 219 insertion-deletion (InDel) and 36 structure variation (SV) markers and spans 800 cM with a mean marker interval of 0.8 cM. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 11 BACs that produced chromosome-specifc signals, we have depicted watermelon chromosomes that correspond to the eleven linkage groups constructed in this study. The high resolution genetic map developed here should be a useful platform for the assembly of the watermelon genome, for the development of sequence-based markers used in breeding programs, and for the identification of genes associated with important agricultural traits.

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