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Tian Q.,Kunming University | Qin S.,National Engineering Research Center for Compounding and Modification of Polymeric MaterialsGuizhou | Zhou R.,Kunming University | Jiang Y.,Kunming University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Vinyl and Additive Technology | Year: 2015

Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS)/(ethylene acrylic acid) (EAA)/organoclay nanocomposites were prepared by using the melt intercalation technique. EAA was used as compatibilizer and organoclay was used as inorganic filler. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results indicated the addition of compatibilizer led to a large increase in basal spacing of nanocomposites and better overall dispersion of organoclay in the PBS matrix. However, the basal spacing was found to be invariant as the organoclay content increased. The differential scanning calorimetry analyses revealed that the incorporation of the organoclay and EAA and the variation of organoclay content altered the melting behavior and crystallization properties of PBS. Storage and loss modulus of virgin matrix increased with the incorporation of organoclay and EAA, and a maximum for the nanocomposite with 9 wt% organoclay. Moreover, the glass transition temperatures also increased for the various organoclay-containing samples. Mechanical properties showed an increase with the incorporation of organoclay and EAA. The 5 wt% organoclay-filled PBS gave the highest tensile strength and notched Izod impact strength among all the composites. Further increments in organoclay loading reduced the tensile strength and notched impact strength of nanocomposites, which was thought to be the result of agglomeration. However, increments in clay loading enhanced the flexural strength and flexural modulus of nanocomposites, with a maximum at 9 wt% organoclay. © 2015 Society of Plastics Engineers. Source


Tian Q.,Kunming University | Qin S.,National Engineering Research Center for Compounding and Modification of Polymeric MaterialsGuizhou | Long L.,National Engineering Research Center for Compounding and Modification of Polymeric MaterialsGuizhou | Jiang Y.,Kunming University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Vinyl and Additive Technology | Year: 2015

The effect of the reaction media on clay dispersion and mechanical properties in poly(butylene succinate) (PBS, a biodegradable aliphatic thermoplastic polyester)/organoclay nanocomposites was investigated in this article. The results suggested that the most dispersed structures can be observed for organoclay modified in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), which was used as solvent in the modification of montmorillonite in this study known for its environmentally benign, inexpensive, and nonflammable solvent, high diffusivity like a gas, near-zero surface tension, low viscosity and density like a liquid, and high-solvency power tunable by adjusting pressure and then organoclay modified in ethanol, while the least for organoclay was modified in distilled water. The results also confirmed intercalation-predominate structures were obtained for nanocomposites of PBS with organoclay modified in ethanol, the mixture of intercalated and exfoliated structures for nanocomposites of PBS with organoclay modified in distilled water, but when clay was modified in scCO2, exfoliation-predominate structures were observed for the nanocomposites. The storage modulus was significantly enhanced below the glass transition temperature, and the glass transition temperature shifted to a higher temperature compared with pure PBS and the maximum for PBS-based nanocomposite of pretreated grafted montmorillonite via modification with trihexyltetradecylphosphonium chloride in scCO2 (OGMMTc). The mechanical properties including tensile strength and notched impact strength first decreased and then increased, whereas flexural strength and flexural modulus steadily and nearly linearly increased, maximum for PBS/OGMMTc nanocomposite, owing to the strong interaction between matrix and clay, which ultimately led to better overall dispersion. © 2015 Society of Plastics Engineers. Source

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