4 Tri Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center

Taipei, Taiwan

4 Tri Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center

Taipei, Taiwan

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PubMed | Chang Gung University, University of California at San Francisco, University of Ulsan, Capital Medical University and 4 Tri Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: AJR. American journal of roentgenology | Year: 2016

The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance and frequency of gas interface artifacts in the jejunum that may mimic severe bowel disease on iodine-density images generated from rapid-voltage-switching dual-energy CT (DECT) scans.Two readers retrospectively reviewed 108 consecutive abdominal rapid-voltage-switching DECT scans to record the presence of image artifacts in jejunal segments with different degrees of gaseous luminal filling, classified as full, partial, or absent. Readers viewed iodine-density images and corresponding 140-kVp and 65-keV virtual monochromatic images and classified the jejunal artifacts on iodine-density images as pseudostratified appearance of the bowel wall, pseudopneumatosis, pseudohyperenhancement, or pseudohypoenhancement. We correlated the presence of the artifacts with clinical features suggesting bowel disease.Image artifacts were found in 91 of 108 scans (84.3%), appeared in 148 of 265 jejunal segments (55.8%), and included each type except for pseudohypoenhancement. Artifacts occurred exclusively when gas was present in the bowel lumen and were seen in 59 of 59 (100%) fully gas-distended segments, 89 of 98 (90.8%) partially gas-distended segments, and none of 108 gas-absent segments (p < 0.0001). In fully and partially gas-distended jejunal segments (n = 157), 148 (94.3%) segments had two or more artifacts. None of the patients was found to have clinical bowel-related injury on follow-up of medical records.Pseudostratified appearance, pseudopneumatosis, and pseudohyperenhancement, but not pseudohypoenhancement, artifacts are common in gas-filled jejunal segments on iodine-density images generated from rapid-voltage-switching DECT scans and are not seen in the corresponding 140-kVp or 65-keV images. Knowledge of the appearance of such iodine-density image artifacts will avoid potential examination interpretation pitfalls.

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