Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Petzer A.L.,Innsbruck Medical University | Fong D.,Innsbruck Medical University | Lion T.,CCRI Childrens Cancer Research Institute | Dyagil I.,RC Radiation Medicine | And 15 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2012

Background Previous data suggest that the response of chronic myeloid leukemia cells to imatinib is dosedependent. The potential benefit of initial dose intensification of imatinib in pre-treated patients with chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia remains unknown. Design and Methods Two hundred and twenty-seven pre-treated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase were randomly assigned to continuous treatment with a standard dose of imatinib (400 mg/day; n=113) or to 6 months of high-dose induction with imatinib (800 mg/day) followed by a standard dose of imatinib as maintenance therapy (n=114). Results The rates of major and complete cytogenetic responses were significantly higher in the highdose arm than in the standard-dose arm at both 3 and 6 months (major cytogenetic responses: 36.8% versus 21.2%, P=0.01 and 50.0% versus 34.5%, P=0.018; complete cytogenetic responses: 22.8% versus 6.2%, P<0.001 and 40.4% versus 16.8%, P<0.001) on the basis of an intentionto-treat analysis. At 12 months, the difference between treatment arms remained statistically significant for complete cytogenetic responses (40.4% versus 24.8%, P=0.012) but not for major cytogenetic responses (49.1% versus 44.2%, P=0.462). The rate of major molecular responses was also significantly better at 3 and 6 months in the high-dose arm (month 3: 14.9% versus 3.5%, P=0.003; month 6: 32.5% versus 8.8%, P<0.001). Overall and progression-free survival rates were comparable between arms, but event-free survival was significantly worse in the high-dose arm (P=0.014). Conclusions Standard-dose imatinib remains the standard of care for pre-treated patients with chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00327262). ©2012 Ferrata Storti Foundation. Source


Petzer A.L.,Innsbruck Medical University | Wolf D.,Innsbruck Medical University | Fong D.,Innsbruck Medical University | Lion T.,CCRI Childrens Cancer Research Institute LabDia Labordiagnostik | And 14 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2010

Background: Imatinib 400 mg/day is the standard treatment for patients with chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia. Recent reports suggested higher and more rapid cytogenetic and molecular responses with higher doses of imatinib. Design and Methods: In this prospective international, multicenter phase III study, 227 patients with pre-treated Philadelphia chromosome-positive, BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia were randomized to a standard-dose imatinib arm (400 mg/day) or a high-dose imatinib arm (800 mg/day for 6 months followed by 400 mg/day as maintenance therapy). In this planned interim analysis hematologic, cytogenetic and molecular responses as well as toxicity were evaluated. Results: Compared to the standard-dose, high-dose imatinib led to higher rates of major and complete cytogenetic responses at both 3 months (major: 21% versus 37%, P=0.01; complete: 6% versus 25%, P<0.001) and 6 months (major: 34% versus 54%, P=0.009; complete: 20% versus 44%, P<0.001). This was paralleled by a significantly higher major molecular response rate at 6 months in the high-dose imatinib arm (11.8% versus 30.4%; P=0.003). At 12 months, the rates of major cytogenetic response (the primary end-point) were comparable between the two arms (57% versus 59%). In contrast to non-hematologic toxicities, grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were more common in the high-dose arm. Cumulative complete cytogenetic response rates were higher in patients without dose reduction in the high-dose arm (61%) than in the patients with no dose reduction in the standard-dose arm (36%) (P=0.014). Conclusions: This is the first randomized phase III trial in patients with pre-treated chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia demonstrating improvements in major cytogenetic response, complete cytogentic response and major molecular response rates with high-dose imatinib therapy (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00327262). © 2010 Ferrata Storti Foundation. Source

Discover hidden collaborations