National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital

Kodaira, Japan

National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital

Kodaira, Japan
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Nakatsuka T.,Toho University | Murayama S.,Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital | Kanemaru K.,Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital | Takao M.,Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Insights into Imaging | Year: 2014

Objectives: Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is common cause of cerebrovascular disorders that predominantly affect elderly patients. When symptomatic, cortical-subcortical intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) in the elderly is the most well-known manifestation of CAA. Furthermore, the clinical presentation varies from a sudden neurological deficit to seizures, transient symptoms and acute progressive cognitive decline. Despite its clinical importance, this multifaceted nature poses a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. The aims of this study were to expound the characteristics of neuroimaging modalities, which cover a wide spectrum of CAA-related imaging findings, and to review the various abnormal findings for which CAA could be responsible. Conclusions: Radiologically, in addition to typical ICH, CAA leads to various types of abnormal findings, including microbleed, subarachnoid haemorrhage, superficial siderosis, microinfarction, reversible oedema, and irreversible leukoaraiosis. Taking into consideration the clinical importance of CAA-related disorders such as haemorrhagic risks and treatable oedema, it is necessary for radiologists to understand the wide spectrum of CAA-related imaging findings. Teaching Points: • To describe the characteristics of imaging modalities and findings of CAA-related disorders. • MRI, especially gradient echo sequences, provides the useful information of CAA-related haemosiderin depositions. • To understand the wide spectrum of CAA-related neuroimaging and clinical features is important. © 2014 The Author(s).


Saito Y.,National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital | Murayama S.,Tokyo Metropolitan University
Brain and Nerve | Year: 2012

In this review, we discuss dementia, depression, olfactory disturbance, sleep disorders and autonomic dysfunction as nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). PD with dementia (PDD) is defined as onset of dementia more than 1 year after the onset of parkinsonism. If dementia precedes or occurs less than 1 year after the onset of parkinsonism, a diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is made. There is essentially no difference in the pathology of PDD and DLB at autopsy, indicating that Braak's hypothesis, which is extracted from PD/PDD and excluding DLB, may be bias. REM-related behavioral disorder (RBD) or depression, the main locus of which is the brain stem, could precede or occur after the onset of PD or DLB, indicating a descending and ascending path of Lewy body (LB) pathology. A disturbance in olfaction usually precedes the onset of PD. Recent data indicate that severe olfactory dysfunction in PD is an indication of a high probability of mental decline. These clinical observations and our pathological reports support the presence of an olfactory-amygdala extension path of LB pathology in addition to Braak's hypothesis. Our pathological studies of consecutive autopsy cases showed that the involvement of autonomic ganglia was more frequent than that of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that initial the stage of LB pathology in Braak's hypothesis should be modified.


Saito Y.,National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital
Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyū no shinpo | Year: 2010

This study investigates the information of available postmortem brain resources in Japan. Data were obtained from personal references,home pages viewing and direct e-mail inquiries to relevant institutes. The most accessible online system was the Japanese Brain Bank Network for Neuroscience Research,which is supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Comprehensive Brain Science Network from Japan's Ministry of Education,Culture,Sports,Science and Technology (http://www.hokatsu-nou.nips.ac.jp/?page_id=71). Among the brain banks,the Brain Bank for Aging Research and Fukushimura Brain Bank were reported in detail in different chapters of this issue. The Brain Bank Committee of the Japanese Society of Neuropathology also allowed an e-mail inquiry with regard to possible resource supply. The National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry provided resource-related information in comformance with the living will of individuals and the Research Resource Network. Niigata University has the largest resource on neurodegenerative disorders. The Postmortem Brain Bank of Fukushima for Psychiatric Research is the only brain bank aimed for schizophrenia research in Japan,but requires direct contact with the bank director. At present the stanley Brain Bank (http://www.stanleyresearch.org/dnn/BrainResearchLaboratorybrBrainCollection/tabid/83/Default.aspx) maybe the most preferable choice for psychiatric research in Japan.


PubMed | National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyu no shinpo | Year: 2010

This study investigates the information of available postmortem brain resources in Japan. Data were obtained from personal references,home pages viewing and direct e-mail inquiries to relevant institutes. The most accessible online system was the Japanese Brain Bank Network for Neuroscience Research,which is supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Comprehensive Brain Science Network from Japans Ministry of Education,Culture,Sports,Science and Technology (http://www.hokatsu-nou.nips.ac.jp/?page_id=71). Among the brain banks,the Brain Bank for Aging Research and Fukushimura Brain Bank were reported in detail in different chapters of this issue. The Brain Bank Committee of the Japanese Society of Neuropathology also allowed an e-mail inquiry with regard to possible resource supply. The National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry provided resource-related information in comformance with the living will of individuals and the Research Resource Network. Niigata University has the largest resource on neurodegenerative disorders. The Postmortem Brain Bank of Fukushima for Psychiatric Research is the only brain bank aimed for schizophrenia research in Japan,but requires direct contact with the bank director. At present the stanley Brain Bank (http://www.stanleyresearch.org/dnn/BrainResearchLaboratorybrBrainCollection/tabid/83/Default.aspx) maybe the most preferable choice for psychiatric research in Japan.


PubMed | National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyu no shinpo | Year: 2012

In this review, we discuss dementia, depression, olfactory disturbance, sleep disorders and autonomic dysfunction as nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). PD with dementia (PDD) is defined as onset of dementia more than 1 year after the onset of parkinsonism. If dementia precedes or occurs less than 1 year after the onset of parkinsonism, a diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is made. There is essentially no difference in the pathology of PDD and DLB at autopsy, indicating that Braaks hypothesis, which is extracted from PD/PDD and excluding DLB, may be bias. REM-related behavioral disorder (RBD) or depression, the main locus of which is the brain stem, could precede or occur after the onset of PD or DLB, indicating a descending and ascending path of Lewy body (LB) pathology. A disturbance in olfaction usually precedes the onset of PD. Recent data indicate that severe olfactory dysfunction in PD is an indication of a high probability of mental decline. These clinical observations and our pathological reports support the presence of an olfactory-amygdala extension path of LB pathology in addition to Braaks hypothesis. Our pathological studies of consecutive autopsy cases showed that the involvement of autonomic ganglia was more frequent than that of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that initial the stage of LB pathology in Braaks hypothesis should be modified.

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