National Center for Natural Products Research

National City, United States

National Center for Natural Products Research

National City, United States
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COSTA MESA, CA--(Marketwired - May 17, 2017) - NEMUS Bioscience, Inc. ( : NMUS) announced that patents have been granted in Canada and Hong Kong covering the company's proprietary prodrug of THC, THC-valine-hemisuccinate (THCVHS), as well as other amide-ester forms of cannabinoid-based molecules. These patents are licensed to Nemus by the University of Mississippi, and further broaden the potential commercial territories for THCVHS. The molecule has already received patent coverage in the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, the European Union, and Australia. THCVHS is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in Nemus' glaucoma drug candidate known as NB1111. "Nemus is very pleased with the patent coverage of this proprietary, bio-engineered version of THC, especially in the Asian markets of Hong Kong and Japan. While glaucoma in western economies is often associated with elevated intra-ocular pressure (IOP), the majority of Asian patients suffer from normo-tensive glaucoma marked by death of the optic nerve in the setting of normal IOP. For these patients, having a therapy with neuroprotective capability, like the cannabinoid-class of molecules, might prove to be a potential first-line therapy," commented Brian Murphy, M.D., CEO and Chief Medical Officer of Nemus. "Our goal is to complete the formulation stage of eye drop development in anticipation of human proof-of-concept studies that can deliver a more hydrophilic or water soluble form of THC into multiple compartments of the eye. In addition, we plan to move forward the suppository formulation of THCVHS for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)." Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, professor at the National Center for Natural Products Research (NCNPR) at the University of Mississippi commented: "The University is gratified to have years of innovative research recognized by a diverse number of territories globally. We look forward to continuing our relationship with Nemus to grow the patent estate not only related to the prodrug of THC and the analogue of CBD, but other types of cannabinoids as well." Dr. Murphy noted, "The recently signed Series E financing led by Schneider Brothers Ltd is a transformative event for Nemus. We look forward to advancing pipeline leads into first-in-human studies as well as working to partner our precision-based cannabinoid therapy where drug delivery is tailored to specific medical conditions in eastern as well as western commercial markets." This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the intellectual property coverage and potential benefits of cannabinoid-based therapies and the timing of our near term, intermediate term and long term goals. Such statements and other statements in this press release that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on management's current expectations and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price could be materially negatively affected. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology including "goal," "focus," "aims," "believes," "can," "could," "challenge," "predictable," "will," or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. We operate in a rapidly changing environment and new risks emerge from time to time. As a result, it is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements the Company may make. Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially include, among others, our capital resources, uncertainty regarding the results of future testing and development efforts and other risks that are described in the Risk Factors section of NEMUS's most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as expressly required by law, NEMUS disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California, focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for significant unmet medical needs in global markets. Utilizing certain proprietary technology licensed from the University of Mississippi, NEMUS is working to develop novel ways to deliver cannabinoid-based drugs for specific indications, with the aim of optimizing the clinical effects of such drugs, while limiting the potential adverse events. NEMUS' strategy will explore the use of natural and synthetic compounds, alone or in combination. The Company is led by a highly qualified team of executives with decades of biopharmaceutical experience and significant background in early-stage drug development. About the University of Mississippi The University of Mississippi, the state's flagship institution, is among the elite group of R-1: Doctoral Universities - Highest Research Activity in the Carnegie Classification. The university has a long history of producing leaders in public service, academics, research and business. Its 15 academic divisions include a major medical school, nationally recognized schools of accountancy, law and pharmacy, and an Honors College acclaimed for a blend of academic rigor, experiential learning and opportunities for community action.


Labib R.,Ain Shams University | Labib R.,National Center for Natural Products Research | Ebada S.,Ain Shams University | Youssef F.,Ain Shams University | And 3 more authors.
Pharmacognosy Magazine | Year: 2016

Background: Leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis are recognized as the leading causes of mortality and morbidity with the greatest prevalence in the developing countries. They affect more than one billion of the poorest people on the globe. Objective: To find a cheap, affordable, safe, and efficacious antileshmanial and antitrypanosomal natural drug and to elucidate its probable mode of action. Materials and Methods: Phytochemical investigation of the non-polar fraction of the methanol extract of leaves of Ochrosia elliptica Labill. (Apocyanaceae) resulted in the isolation of ursolic acid, which was unambiguously determined based on HR-ESI-FTMS, extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. It was further tested for its cytotoxicity, antimicrobial, antimalarial, antileishmanial, and trypanocidal potency. in-silico molecular modeling studies were conducted on six vital parasitic enzymes including farnesyl diphosphate synthase, N -myristoyl transferase, pteridine reductase 1, trypanothione reductase, methionyl-tRNA synthetase, and inosine-adenosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase to discover its potential mode of action as antitrypanosomal and antileishmanial agent. Results: Ursolic acid displayed considerable antitrypanosomal and antileishmanial activities with IC50 values ranging between 1.53 and 8.79 μg/mL. It showed superior antitrypanosomal activity as compared to the standard drug difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), with higher binding affinities towards trypanothione reductase and pteridine reductase 1. It displayed free binding energy of -30.73 and -50.08 kcal/mole towards the previously mentioned enzymes, respectively. In addition, ursolic acid exhibited considerable affinities to farnesyl diphosphate synthase, N -myristoyl transferase and methionyl-tRNA synthetase with free binding energies ranging from -42.54 to -63.93 kcal/mole. Conclusion: Ursolic acid offers a safe, effective and cheap antitrypanosomal and antileishmanial candidate acting on several key parasitic enzymes. © 2016 Pharmacognosy Magazine Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.


News Article | October 3, 2016
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Since 2012, the message board PubPeer has served as a sort of 4chan for science, allowing anyone to post anonymous comments on scientific studies. Originally intended as a forum for the discussion of methods and results, PubPeer has perhaps become best known as a clearinghouse for accusations of scientific error, fraud, and misconduct—forcing journals to issue corrections and retractions, damaging careers, and eventually embroiling the site in a court case in which it's advised by Edward Snowden's legal team at the American Civil Liberties Union. In the view of its critics, PubPeer enables an unchecked stream of accusations with no accountability. But to its supporters, PubPeer is maybe the only consistently effective way to expose fraud and error in the current scientific system. It exists at a time of quiet crisis for science and science journals, when the community is concerned about an inability to replicate past results—the so-called "reproducibility crisis"—and the number of papers retracted is on the rise. The traditional system of peer review seems unable to address these problems. "We started it because we wanted more detailed arguments about science, and we were really shocked at how many fundamental problems there are with papers, involving very questionable research practices and rather obvious misconduct," said Brandon Stell, a neuroscientist at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris and the creator of PubPeer. There's certainly no denying its effect. According to Retraction Watch, a blog that monitors scientific corrections, errors, and fraud, at least three high-profile scientists in the past few months have had their studies retracted by journals after their data was questioned by anonymous commenters on PubPeer. The most frightening words a researcher could read on PubPeer are 'There are concerns' One of the scientists, Fazlul Sarkar, is currently suing several of the commenters. His lawyers argue the site must reveal the identities of the users that have done damage to Sarkar's career, after he lost a tenured position at the University of Mississippi. PubPeer has refused to release the information. Both Google and Twitter have filed a court brief in support of the site, which is currently being defended pro-bono by lawyers from the ACLU. It's perhaps the most interesting case about internet privacy you've never heard of, and it all stems from a frustration among scientists with the shadowy politics of publishing and peer review. At its base, PubPeer is a site that allows anyone to post comments on any scientific paper listed on the federally-funded PubMed database, either anonymously or under their own name. It's functionally very simple, but the built-in anonymity makes it a safe outlet for scientists—especially young, early-career scientists—to discuss and criticize research without fear of repercussion. And that's something they're apparently eager to do: The site has logged over 55,000 mostly anonymous comments since its launch. Back in October 2013, someone on the PubPeer site started threads for about 20 previously published papers on which Fazlul Sarkar, a cancer researcher then at Wayne State University in Michigan, was an author. The papers span over a decade and involve a variety of complex molecular signalling pathways involved in cancer. The issues raised by the comments, though, were relatively straightforward: They claimed that images in these studies appeared to have been changed, duplicated, and re-used across papers, suggesting that the experiments they appeared in may have never actually happened, or could have produced different results. Stell noted that, in an effort to keep the discussion civil (and legal), PubPeer specifically requests that users do not accuse authors outright of misrepresentation or fraud. Comments are moderated in case they break these guidelines, so any discussion of such allegations tends to have a muted tone. That doesn't make this group of self-appointed watchdogs any less effective, though. The most frightening words a researcher could read on PubPeer are "There are concerns." Discussion over "concerns" surrounding Sarkar's work expanded rapidly as it became clear the commenters had found a rich vein to mine: According to the NIH funding database and PubMed, Sarkar has received more than $12 million in NIH funding and authored over 500 research papers over his career. The community is nothing if not meticulous—PubPeer commenters have been known to pull up decades-old PhD theses looking for dirt—and a search of the message board shows that eventually 77 papers with Sarkar on the author list were presented for scrutiny. By checking the papers against each other patterns began to emerge; for example, one user claims a single set of images were duplicated up to 54 times in 13 papers, across three years. Read more: Scientists Are Concerned About 'Peer Review By Algorithm' What the community appeared to have identified was a shady scientific photoshopping spree that had gone undiscovered by grant committees and the editors and peer reviewers at prestigious journals for over a decade. Many of the site's visitors embrace this kind of investigative approach. "I came to PubPeer partly out of frustration," Elisabeth Bik, a microbiology researcher at Stanford University and regular PubPeer user, told me. Bik said she posts under her own name when discussing the scientific merits of a paper, but prefers to remain anonymous when pursuing her other major interest: identifying manipulated or fraudulent images in scientific figures. (Bik said that while she has used PubPeer to discuss image manipulation on several occasions, she was not involved in the Sarkar threads.) "For some of these cases I was reporting them to the [journal] editors," she said. "This seemed to be the most honest way, and it also gives the authors a chance to reply, but it was very frustrating to realise that many of these editors would never write me back or they would write me back like, 'Oh we're going to investigate,' and then crickets after that." Other scientists I spoke to described similar experiences of sharing concerns with journals and being ignored or strung along, all the while convinced that the targets of their criticism were being shielded. When asked about these concerns from scientists, a spokesperson for Nature Research, which publishes multiple journals including Nature, provided a statement to Motherboard by email. They said that submitted papers "undergo rigorous peer review," and are always assumed to be "provided in good faith." The papers are automatically checked for plagiarism and image-manipulation, and editors and peer reviewers can be engaged to correct or retract a paper if concerns arise. "We take all concerns about papers we have published seriously, whether raised by identified individuals or reported anonymously, and consider each one carefully on a case-by-case basis," they said. A representative for Cell Press similarly affirmed their editors' commitment to correcting the scientific record, noting that "because we consider the investigation process confidential we don't report back in detail to the person who submitted the concern." Many observers though, aren't convinced that journals and other gatekeepers are doing enough on their own. "For decades, researchers and editors were ignoring anonymous and critical comments until you see some sort of accountability," said Ivan Oransky of Retraction Watch. He said that his site is regularly contacted by would-be critics and whistleblowers, but the volume is simply too high for the small staff of journalists to pursue. PubPeer, he said, offers an outlet for them. Accusing someone of fraud isn't a game, least of all to the person being accused. And the allegations against Sarkar weren't just an academic exercise: As often happens with popular PubPeer threads, someone had been sending the findings to any official channel that might be able to do something about it, including the journals that printed Sarkar's research, and his employers. Unfortunately for Sarkar, this happened at a critical time in his career. According to court documents obtained by Retraction Watch, in June 2014 he had just resigned from Wayne State University and accepted a prestigious offer of a tenured position at the University of Mississippi, including a lab start-up bonus and a salary of $350,000. But just 11 days before he was supposed to start that position—his attorney notes he had just made an offer on a house in Oxford, Mississippi—the offer was rescinded. All because of the PubPeer investigation. As reported in the court documents, a letter dated June 19, 2014 from Larry Walker, director of the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi Cancer Institute and Sarkar's main contact about the job, "cited PubPeer as the reason, stating in relevant part that he had received a series of emails forwarded anonymously from (sic?) PubPeer.com, containing several posts regarding papers from your lab." Emails were allegedly also sent anonymously to other researchers at the university, effectively making all of Sarkar's new co-workers aware of the controversy before he even arrived on campus. It's perhaps the most interesting case about internet privacy you've never heard of Sarkar responded in 2014 by suing both the university for terminating his offer and several anonymous PubPeer commenters for defamation. In January 2016, a judge dismissed the case against the University of Mississippi, but the case against PubPeer is ongoing. Sarkar's lawyers argue that the commenters weren't simply discussing his work, but attacking his character. They sent PubPeer a subpoena to release the names and IP addresses of the commenters in question. As a hobby project run by an early-career research scientist and his friends, PubPeer wasn't exactly well-equipped to defend itself from a legal challenge. But its appeal as an anonymous whistleblowing platform placed it in the vicinity of debates on privacy and disclosure that were still raging less than a year after Snowden's first NSA document release. "I get this email from somebody, basically they had been in contact with Ben Wizner, and Ben Wizner would be interested in talking to us about this," said Stell. Ben Wizner, director of the ACLU's Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project, is one of Edward Snowden's lawyers. "They said he's willing to help us and I'm like, wow, this is amazing!" The ACLU quickly arranged a legal team to work on PubPeer's behalf, at no charge. "People aren't exactly being thrown in jail, but scientific discourse suffers when scientists can't speak their mind free from the threat that their current or future superiors would know that it's them lodging the criticism," said Alexander Abdo, a senior attorney at the ACLU and one of several working on PubPeer's case. "You have to burn all of your bridges to go public with the criticisms you have. Anonymity offers some breathing space." "I think PubPeer is trying to take advantage of anonymity for the very reason it is constitutionally protected. Anonymity offers you a shield from those who would persecute you for your views," he added. Stell, the founder of PubPeer, agreed. "If we [stick] our neck out and [say] something about our colleagues' work, then that could have a serious impact on our own careers," he said. Read more: This Blog Finds the Stories Behind Retracted Papers But Nicholas Roumel, a partner at NachtLaw in Michigan who is representing Sarkar in the case, argues that the anonymous commenters have been given greater protection than their target, who can't even address his accusers by name. "Of course anonymous speakers should be given First Amendment protection," he told Motherboard via email. "The issue is whether anonymous speech should be given greater protection under the First Amendment than non-anonymous speech. The cowards who post anonymously claim they deserve greater protection because they fear persecution—but they have no problem destroying careers like Dr. Sarkar's from beneath their rocks. That's hypocrisy." Roumel, who pointed out that he is a member of the ACLU and chairs his local ACLU lawyers' committee, argues that his client is being held to a higher legal standard than his accusers. He said that by filing briefs in support of PubPeer, social media giants like Google and Twitter are agreeing with an idea that he finds troubling. "They argue that it should be more difficult for victims like Dr. Sarkar to file and prove their cases against anonymous defendants," he said. Sarkar did not respond to requests for comment for this story. As it stands, the case is effectively deadlocked. In March 2015, a judge denied the subpoena against the majority of the PubPeer commenters, save one, whose contributions, Sarkar's attorneys argued, were especially and egregiously damaging. PubPeer was ordered to hand over all available information they had on the user, including the IP address they used to access the site. The ACLU has appealed that decision, while Sarkar's attorneys have appealed the decision to dismiss the other requests. The appeal hearings are set to take place on October 4th. In perhaps the strangest twist to emerge, a court brief submitted by Sarkar's attorneys shows that the PubPeer user whose identity Sarkar's lawyers are most interested in used an email address belonging to "Clare Francis." Francis is a pseudonym used by science publishing's greatest gadfly, a person or group that has sent "hundreds" (possibly now thousands) of anonymous tips to journal editors, beginning sometime around 2010. She is so prolific that the publishing giant Elsevier previously revealed that they have special directions to editors in place for evaluating tips originating from Francis—helped along, no doubt, by Francis's propensity to CC the tips to the New York Times. As such, the latest legal order has the potential to clear up one of the longest-running mysteries in science publishing, by unmasking the person or persons responsible for the Clare Francis phenomenon. Although the case is stalled, the damage has already been done to Sarkar's career. As of the time of this writing thirteen of his high profile papers were retracted by the journals that published them—six in just one month—and, as one astute commenter on Retraction Watch noted, Sarkar's name appears on a list of staff retiring from Wayne State University this year. He is a scientist without a lab, and the first results that appear on his PubMed listing are now a string of retractions. There are many within the scientific community who are wary of putting too much stock in the investigative power of an anonymous mob. The editors of two large journals have made arguments against anonymous criticism, and Michael Blatt, the editor of Plant Physiology, has addressed PubPeer directly. In an editorial, Blatt agreed that there must be a way to address "bona-fide fraud" in his own field of plant biology, but maintained that "anonymity is not the answer, however, not if due process is to ensure civil society and protect the innocent from denouncement or worse." Many PubPeer commenters who spoke with Motherboard had worries about people using anonymous posts to carry out personal or misplaced attacks. "There are definitely cases where it seems like someone has an agenda," one said. Another suggested there could be cases where an ex-student or employee could make unfounded allegations about a colleague with whom they had a poor working relationship. Even when motivations are pure, there is also the chance of erroneous accusations. Bik, the Stanford microbiologist, said that when she first started flagging possible image manipulations on PubPeer, she occasionally got it wrong. Most erroneous or easily explained concerns posted on the site are either cleared up quickly by the commenters or the authors of the paper in question. Still, the threads are a public record most scientists wouldn't want associated with their work. Bik said she has been much more careful since. But scientific fraud may be far more widespread than a few bad apples. Bik has turned her interest in image manipulation into an official parallel research stream, and she recently released a paper about this on a pre-print server with Arturo Casadevall and Ferric Fang, influential scientists and advocates for journal reform. They showed that almost four percent of images in a survey of 20,000 papers from top journals were "problematic," with many showing signs of direct image manipulation. Authors with a single manipulated image were likely to have more, they write, and some journals were worse offenders than others. And as it stands, the best way to get those cases addressed often still appears to be raising an anonymous alarm. As Oransky, of Retraction Watch, pointed out, PubMed itself recently introduced a comment system linked to scientists' institutional email addresses, allowing them to comment on papers under their real names. But it doesn't quite deliver the same results. "There are no cases of retractions coming out of named comments, as far as I'm aware," he said. "Anonymity is the key here," he added. Stell said that while he hopes to encourage people to use their own names and foster more basic scientific discussion, he also plans to keep PubPeer functioning as an effective whistleblowing platform. He says the site is both beefing up its anonymity—holding as little user data as possible, and making it easy for people to set up to connect through Tor—and working on a variety of ways to encourage people to post discussion and criticism under their real names. The idea is that when all scientists—not just the few that are appointed for peer-review—are free to evaluate research in a public forum, fraud and bad data would become less of an issue. But while PubPeer's founders attempt to steer users away from the rigid hierarchy of scientific journals and toward better scientific discussion, the community is free to continue functioning as a sort of unruly conscience to the powers that be, using the tools of anonymity and the internet to clean up science in their own way. Correction: An earlier version of the story incorrectly quoted journalist Leonid Schneider saying PubPeer users are "trolling peer review to promote its ethics." The quote did not refer to PubPeer users, so it has been removed from the story. Get six of our favorite Motherboard stories every day by signing up for our newsletter.


Makboul M.A.,Assiut University | Attia A.A.,Assiut University | Farag S.F.,Assiut University | Mohamed N.M.,Assiut University | And 4 more authors.
Natural Product Research | Year: 2013

A new pentacyclic triterpenoid, 3β,25-epoxy-3α,22β, 23α-trihydroxy-olean-12-en-28-oic acid (1), together with seven known compounds, including five triterpenoids, β-amyrin (2), lantadene B (3), lantanilic acid (4), lantanolic acid (5) and ursolic acid (6) in addition to β-sitosterol (7) and benzoic acid (8) has been isolated from the leaves of Lantana montevidensis. Their chemical structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with the literature data and/or authentic samples. Compound 1 showed moderate to weak antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.


ElSohly M.A.,Elsohly Laboratories, Inc. | ElSohly M.A.,Inc. PSI | ElSohly M.A.,National Center for Natural Products Research | ElSohly M.A.,University of Mississippi | And 14 more authors.
Journal of Analytical Toxicology | Year: 2012

Methylhexaneamine (MHA) has been marketed in dietary supplements based on arguments that it is a constituent of geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) leaves, stems, roots or oil, and therefore qualifies as a dietary ingredient. The purpose of this study is to determine whether P. graveolens plant material (authenticated) or its oil contains detectable quantities of MHA. Two analytical methods were developed for the analysis of MHA in P. graveolens using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The results were further confirmed using liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. Twenty commercial volatile oils, three authenticated volatile oils and authenticated P. graveolens leaves and stems (young and mature, and fresh and dried) were analyzed for MHA content. In addition, three dietary supplements containing MHA that alleged P. graveolens as the source are analyzed for their MHA content. The data show that none of the authenticated P. graveolens essential oils or plant material, nor any commercial volatile oil of Pelargonium (geranium oil) contain MHA at detectable levels (limit of detection: 10 ppb). The dietary supplements that contained MHA as one of their ingredients (allegedly from geranium or geranium stems) contained large amounts of MHA. The amounts of MHA measured are incompatible with the use of reasonable amounts of P. graveolens extract or concentrate, suggesting that MHA was of synthetic origin. © The Author [2012]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


COSTA MESA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / November 15, 2016 / NEMUS Bioscience, Inc. (OTCQB: NMUS) announced that significant data concerning the IOP lowering effect of NB1111 and duration of action will be presented at the 2016 AAPS National Meeting being held in Denver, Colorado on Wednesday, November 16, 2016, at 8:30 a.m. (MST) by the company's research and commercialization partner, the University of Mississippi. The abstract, "Effect of single versus multiple day regimen of Δ9 -THC-valine-hemisuccinate (THCVHS) on the intra-ocular pressure (IOP) lowering activity in normotensive rabbits" (abstract # 30W0830), reports data comparing the Nemus prodrug of tetrahydrocannabinol (THCVHS) also known as NB1111, to established glaucoma therapies of Pilocarpine and Timolol, as well as standard Δ9 -THC in both emulsion and solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) eye drops. All studies were conducted in a normal, non-glaucomatous eye. A link to the abstract on the AAPS website can be found at https://annual.aapsmeeting.org/poster/member/66948. The goals of the studies were to examine penetration and concentration of NB1111 in ocular tissues responsible for IOP regulation and to correlate that concentration to measurement of IOP. Additionally, the studies examined the effect on drug half-life by encapsulating NB1111 in a SLN with single- and multiple-day dosing for up to five days. NB1111 lowered IOP in a normal eye in a statistically significant manner with peak IOP decline of 32% versus 16% for Pilocarpine and 23% for Timolol (p< 0.05); prior experiments in a glaucomatous eye exhibited a 45% IOP reduction for NB1111 The experiments demonstrated that increased drug concentration of NB1111 in the ciliary body and retina/choroid plexus was correlated with a decline in IOP; these ocular organs help regulate IOP Use of Δ9 - THC (parent molecule, non-prodrug), whether formulated in an emulsion or SLN eye drop solution, resulted in no significant tissue concentration nor decline in IOP Formulation of NB1111 into an SLN produced a duration of activity that could be consistent with twice daily eye drop dosing in humans and successfully transported the drug into both the anterior and posterior compartments of the eye and was highly significant compared to both approved comparator drugs (p<0.001) No safety issues were noted with the administration of NB1111 over five days dosing No free THC was detected in the peripheral circulation of the test animals after repeated dosing NB1111 using an assay with nanogram detection sensitivity "These findings are critical to our understanding on how this novel prodrug of THC can reduce IOP so effectively," stated Soumyajit Majumdar, PhD, Professor of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Pharmacy at the university and lead scientist of the ophthalmic studies of NB1111. "As important as the ocular findings were in these studies, we were also pleased to see that the plasma THC levels in these animals, even those undergoing repeated ocular dosing, did not have detectable levels of THC. This is a key safety finding for this drug." Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, professor at the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi, commented: "Multiple experiments, including previously reported data, have clearly demonstrated a causal relationship between the drug's tissue concentration and IOP lowering in both normal and glaucomatous eyes. This unique prodrug technology has enhanced treatment concentrations in the eye and could signal a new therapeutic class for the management of glaucoma." "NB1111 has performed above expectations in the ability to lower IOP in these animal models. We want to further explore the neuroprotective effects of cannabinoids upon the optic nerve and move the ophthalmology program into human testing. I am also happy to report that our colleagues at the University of Mississippi have been able to develop an early ocular formulation of our CBD analogue, and in doing so, expands our ocular program into a full-fledged ophthalmology platform that could address multiple eye diseases beyond glaucoma, including diseases of the retina," noted Brian Murphy, MD, MBA, Nemus CEO and Chief Medical Officer. This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the potential benefits of NB1111 and the timing of our near term, intermediate term and long term goals. Such statements and other statements in this press release that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on management's current expectations and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price could be materially negatively affected. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology including "goal," "focus," "aims," "believes," "can," “could,” "challenge," "predictable," "will," or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. We operate in a rapidly changing environment and new risks emerge from time to time. As a result, it is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements the Company may make. Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially include, among others, uncertainty regarding the results of future testing and development efforts and other risks that are described in the Risk Factors section of NEMUS's most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as expressly required by law, NEMUS disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California, focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for significant unmet medical needs in global markets. Utilizing certain proprietary technology licensed from the University of Mississippi, NEMUS is working to develop novel ways to deliver cannabinoid-based drugs for specific indications, with the aim of optimizing the clinical effects of such drugs, while limiting the potential adverse events. NEMUS' strategy will explore the use of natural and synthetic compounds, alone or in combination. The Company is led by a highly qualified team of executives with decades of biopharmaceutical experience and significant background in early-stage drug development. COSTA MESA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / November 15, 2016 / NEMUS Bioscience, Inc. (OTCQB: NMUS) announced that significant data concerning the IOP lowering effect of NB1111 and duration of action will be presented at the 2016 AAPS National Meeting being held in Denver, Colorado on Wednesday, November 16, 2016, at 8:30 a.m. (MST) by the company's research and commercialization partner, the University of Mississippi. The abstract, "Effect of single versus multiple day regimen of Δ9 -THC-valine-hemisuccinate (THCVHS) on the intra-ocular pressure (IOP) lowering activity in normotensive rabbits" (abstract # 30W0830), reports data comparing the Nemus prodrug of tetrahydrocannabinol (THCVHS) also known as NB1111, to established glaucoma therapies of Pilocarpine and Timolol, as well as standard Δ9 -THC in both emulsion and solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) eye drops. All studies were conducted in a normal, non-glaucomatous eye. A link to the abstract on the AAPS website can be found at https://annual.aapsmeeting.org/poster/member/66948. The goals of the studies were to examine penetration and concentration of NB1111 in ocular tissues responsible for IOP regulation and to correlate that concentration to measurement of IOP. Additionally, the studies examined the effect on drug half-life by encapsulating NB1111 in a SLN with single- and multiple-day dosing for up to five days. NB1111 lowered IOP in a normal eye in a statistically significant manner with peak IOP decline of 32% versus 16% for Pilocarpine and 23% for Timolol (p< 0.05); prior experiments in a glaucomatous eye exhibited a 45% IOP reduction for NB1111 The experiments demonstrated that increased drug concentration of NB1111 in the ciliary body and retina/choroid plexus was correlated with a decline in IOP; these ocular organs help regulate IOP Use of Δ9 - THC (parent molecule, non-prodrug), whether formulated in an emulsion or SLN eye drop solution, resulted in no significant tissue concentration nor decline in IOP Formulation of NB1111 into an SLN produced a duration of activity that could be consistent with twice daily eye drop dosing in humans and successfully transported the drug into both the anterior and posterior compartments of the eye and was highly significant compared to both approved comparator drugs (p<0.001) No safety issues were noted with the administration of NB1111 over five days dosing No free THC was detected in the peripheral circulation of the test animals after repeated dosing NB1111 using an assay with nanogram detection sensitivity "These findings are critical to our understanding on how this novel prodrug of THC can reduce IOP so effectively," stated Soumyajit Majumdar, PhD, Professor of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Pharmacy at the university and lead scientist of the ophthalmic studies of NB1111. "As important as the ocular findings were in these studies, we were also pleased to see that the plasma THC levels in these animals, even those undergoing repeated ocular dosing, did not have detectable levels of THC. This is a key safety finding for this drug." Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, professor at the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi, commented: "Multiple experiments, including previously reported data, have clearly demonstrated a causal relationship between the drug's tissue concentration and IOP lowering in both normal and glaucomatous eyes. This unique prodrug technology has enhanced treatment concentrations in the eye and could signal a new therapeutic class for the management of glaucoma." "NB1111 has performed above expectations in the ability to lower IOP in these animal models. We want to further explore the neuroprotective effects of cannabinoids upon the optic nerve and move the ophthalmology program into human testing. I am also happy to report that our colleagues at the University of Mississippi have been able to develop an early ocular formulation of our CBD analogue, and in doing so, expands our ocular program into a full-fledged ophthalmology platform that could address multiple eye diseases beyond glaucoma, including diseases of the retina," noted Brian Murphy, MD, MBA, Nemus CEO and Chief Medical Officer. This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the potential benefits of NB1111 and the timing of our near term, intermediate term and long term goals. Such statements and other statements in this press release that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on management's current expectations and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price could be materially negatively affected. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology including "goal," "focus," "aims," "believes," "can," “could,” "challenge," "predictable," "will," or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. We operate in a rapidly changing environment and new risks emerge from time to time. As a result, it is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements the Company may make. Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially include, among others, uncertainty regarding the results of future testing and development efforts and other risks that are described in the Risk Factors section of NEMUS's most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as expressly required by law, NEMUS disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California, focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for significant unmet medical needs in global markets. Utilizing certain proprietary technology licensed from the University of Mississippi, NEMUS is working to develop novel ways to deliver cannabinoid-based drugs for specific indications, with the aim of optimizing the clinical effects of such drugs, while limiting the potential adverse events. NEMUS' strategy will explore the use of natural and synthetic compounds, alone or in combination. The Company is led by a highly qualified team of executives with decades of biopharmaceutical experience and significant background in early-stage drug development.


Kutrzeba L.M.,University of Mississippi | Li X.-C.,National Center for Natural Products Research | Ding Y.,National Center for Natural Products Research | Ferreira D.,University of Mississippi | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Natural Products | Year: 2010

Extraction of fresh Salvia divinorum leaves afforded salvinorins E and D as potential biosynthesis precursors of salvinorin A, a major metabolite and a potent hallucinogen. Attempts at HPLC purification of salvinorin E (2) with acetonitrile as a solvent revealed an equilibrium with its regioisomer, salvinorin D (3), in a 3:5 ratio. The presence of both compounds was readily observed in the 1H NMR spectrum. This spontaneous formation of the mixture of isomers occurs via a dynamic intramolecular transacetylation process. © 2010 The American Chemical Society and American Society of Pharmacognosy.


COSTA MESA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 12, 2016 / NEMUS Bioscience, Inc. (OTCQB: NMUS) announced that a patent has been granted covering the company's proprietary prodrug of THC, THC-valine-hemisuccinate (THCVHS), in Australia, and that another patent will be allowed covering THCVHS in the E.U., pending company identification of E.U. member countries for formal patent issuance. These patents, which are licensed to the Company by the University of Mississippi, complement patents granted in the United States on THCVHS in 2014 and Japan in 2015, which are also licensed to the Company by the University of Mississippi. THCVHS is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in Nemus' drug candidates known as NB1111, which is being developed for the management and treatment of glaucoma, and NB1222, which is being developed for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. "The core API of the lead Nemus developmental candidates, NB1111 and NB1222, now has intellectual property protection in major markets worldwide. This is an important development for Nemus, which is focused on developing cannabinoid therapeutics. Having patents granted in multiple territories, especially in the U.S., Japan, and the E.U., which are the top three commercial markets for pharmaceutical products in the world, strengthens the company's ability to explore potential collaborations with pharmaceutical and biotech companies," commented Brian Murphy, M.D., CEO and Chief Medical Officer of Nemus. "The value of cannabinoids formulated for therapeutic uses is being recognized on a global scale. We are happy that our proprietary technology is being appreciated for its uniqueness and look forward to helping advance this science to the commercial stage," stated Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, professor at the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi and principal investigator on the projects. "Nemus and the University are also working on unique molecular approaches to other cannabinoid derivatives in an effort to create therapeutic candidates that can be customized for specific medical conditions. We view this as an integral part of our goal to be a leader in the development of second- and third-generation cannabinoid medications," said Dr. Murphy. This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the intellectual property coverage and potential benefits of NB1111 and NB1222 and the timing of our near term, intermediate term and long term goals. Such statements and other statements in this press release that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on management's current expectations and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price could be materially negatively affected. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology including "goal," "focus," "aims," "believes," "can," "could," "challenge," "predictable," "will," or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. We operate in a rapidly changing environment and new risks emerge from time to time. As a result, it is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements the Company may make. Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially include, among others, our capital resources, uncertainty regarding the results of future testing and development efforts and other risks that are described in the Risk Factors section of NEMUS's most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as expressly required by law, NEMUS disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California, focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for significant unmet medical needs in global markets. Utilizing certain proprietary technology licensed from the University of Mississippi, NEMUS is working to develop novel ways to deliver cannabinoid-based drugs for specific indications, with the aim of optimizing the clinical effects of such drugs, while limiting the potential adverse events. NEMUS' strategy will explore the use of natural and synthetic compounds, alone or in combination. The Company is led by a highly qualified team of executives with decades of biopharmaceutical experience and significant background in early-stage drug development. COSTA MESA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 12, 2016 / NEMUS Bioscience, Inc. (OTCQB: NMUS) announced that a patent has been granted covering the company's proprietary prodrug of THC, THC-valine-hemisuccinate (THCVHS), in Australia, and that another patent will be allowed covering THCVHS in the E.U., pending company identification of E.U. member countries for formal patent issuance. These patents, which are licensed to the Company by the University of Mississippi, complement patents granted in the United States on THCVHS in 2014 and Japan in 2015, which are also licensed to the Company by the University of Mississippi. THCVHS is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in Nemus' drug candidates known as NB1111, which is being developed for the management and treatment of glaucoma, and NB1222, which is being developed for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. "The core API of the lead Nemus developmental candidates, NB1111 and NB1222, now has intellectual property protection in major markets worldwide. This is an important development for Nemus, which is focused on developing cannabinoid therapeutics. Having patents granted in multiple territories, especially in the U.S., Japan, and the E.U., which are the top three commercial markets for pharmaceutical products in the world, strengthens the company's ability to explore potential collaborations with pharmaceutical and biotech companies," commented Brian Murphy, M.D., CEO and Chief Medical Officer of Nemus. "The value of cannabinoids formulated for therapeutic uses is being recognized on a global scale. We are happy that our proprietary technology is being appreciated for its uniqueness and look forward to helping advance this science to the commercial stage," stated Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, professor at the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi and principal investigator on the projects. "Nemus and the University are also working on unique molecular approaches to other cannabinoid derivatives in an effort to create therapeutic candidates that can be customized for specific medical conditions. We view this as an integral part of our goal to be a leader in the development of second- and third-generation cannabinoid medications," said Dr. Murphy. This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the intellectual property coverage and potential benefits of NB1111 and NB1222 and the timing of our near term, intermediate term and long term goals. Such statements and other statements in this press release that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on management's current expectations and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price could be materially negatively affected. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology including "goal," "focus," "aims," "believes," "can," "could," "challenge," "predictable," "will," or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. We operate in a rapidly changing environment and new risks emerge from time to time. As a result, it is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements the Company may make. Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially include, among others, our capital resources, uncertainty regarding the results of future testing and development efforts and other risks that are described in the Risk Factors section of NEMUS's most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as expressly required by law, NEMUS disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California, focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for significant unmet medical needs in global markets. Utilizing certain proprietary technology licensed from the University of Mississippi, NEMUS is working to develop novel ways to deliver cannabinoid-based drugs for specific indications, with the aim of optimizing the clinical effects of such drugs, while limiting the potential adverse events. NEMUS' strategy will explore the use of natural and synthetic compounds, alone or in combination. The Company is led by a highly qualified team of executives with decades of biopharmaceutical experience and significant background in early-stage drug development.


COSTA MESA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2016 / NEMUS Bioscience, Inc. (OTCQB: NMUS) announced that an analog of CBD, developed by the University of Mississippi and formulated as an eye drop, was shown to enter the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye in animal models. Conversely, standard CBD, studied in parallel experiments, had negligible ocular concentrations. Nemus believes that this CBD analog, that is being developed as Nemus drug candidate NB2222 for the treatment and/or management of eye diseases, could have clinical utility across a spectrum of eye pathology, particularly those associated with the posterior compartment of the eye. Brian Murphy, M.D., M.B.A., Nemus CEO and Chief Medical Officer commented, "CBD has long been associated with the neuroprotective attributes of the cannabinoid family of molecules, but its bioavailability and pharmacokinetics can be less than optimal with oral administration. Nemus, through its relationship with the University of Mississippi, is focused on developing second- and third-generation cannabinoid molecules that can be customized to specific disease states. We believe NB2222 supplements our cannabinoid-based ophthalmology platform and has the potential to address diseases in multiple chambers of the eye." "Cannabinoid molecules, as a class, hold great potential and we are working with Nemus to create re-engineered versions of those molecules to enhance the therapeutic profile of these compounds," stated Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, professor at the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi. "Our shared vision is to further grow the library of cannabinoids currently being considered as therapeutic targets." "Historically, CBD has shown promise as both an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent in in vivo model systems of eye disease," stated Soumyajit Majumdar, PhD, Professor of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Pharmacy at the university and lead scientist of the ophthalmology program. "Potential uses for this analog of CBD include uveitis and dry eye syndrome in the anterior compartment of the eye, and diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration in the posterior compartment. We look forward to further formulation refinement of this molecule into a form that is optimized for development as a commercialized drug." "With an evolving portfolio of proprietary cannabinoid-based candidates, Nemus intends to seek pharmaceutical corporate partners to co-develop these assets," stated Dr. Murphy. Our portfolio of candidates is designed to leverage the potential pleiotropic benefits of cannabinoids across a variety of conditions, including: "We look forward to presenting this collection of data, as well as our anti-infective platform, at upcoming scientific meetings in 2017." This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the potential benefits of NB1111, NB1222, NB2111, and NB2222 as well as the timing of our near term, intermediate term and long term goals. Such statements and other statements in this press release that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on management's current expectations and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price could be materially negatively affected. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology including "goal," "focus," "aims," "believes," "can," "could," "challenge," "predictable," "will," or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. We operate in a rapidly changing environment and new risks emerge from time to time. As a result, it is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements the Company may make. Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially include, among others, our capital resources, uncertainty regarding the results of future testing and development efforts and other risks that are described in the Risk Factors section of NEMUS's most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as expressly required by law, NEMUS disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California, focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for significant unmet medical needs in global markets. Utilizing certain proprietary technology licensed from the University of Mississippi, NEMUS is working to develop novel ways to deliver cannabinoid-based drugs for specific indications, with the aim of optimizing the clinical effects of such drugs, while limiting the potential adverse events. NEMUS' strategy will explore the use of natural and synthetic compounds, alone or in combination. The Company is led by a highly qualified team of executives with decades of biopharmaceutical experience and significant background in early-stage drug development. COSTA MESA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2016 / NEMUS Bioscience, Inc. (OTCQB: NMUS) announced that an analog of CBD, developed by the University of Mississippi and formulated as an eye drop, was shown to enter the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye in animal models. Conversely, standard CBD, studied in parallel experiments, had negligible ocular concentrations. Nemus believes that this CBD analog, that is being developed as Nemus drug candidate NB2222 for the treatment and/or management of eye diseases, could have clinical utility across a spectrum of eye pathology, particularly those associated with the posterior compartment of the eye. Brian Murphy, M.D., M.B.A., Nemus CEO and Chief Medical Officer commented, "CBD has long been associated with the neuroprotective attributes of the cannabinoid family of molecules, but its bioavailability and pharmacokinetics can be less than optimal with oral administration. Nemus, through its relationship with the University of Mississippi, is focused on developing second- and third-generation cannabinoid molecules that can be customized to specific disease states. We believe NB2222 supplements our cannabinoid-based ophthalmology platform and has the potential to address diseases in multiple chambers of the eye." "Cannabinoid molecules, as a class, hold great potential and we are working with Nemus to create re-engineered versions of those molecules to enhance the therapeutic profile of these compounds," stated Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, professor at the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi. "Our shared vision is to further grow the library of cannabinoids currently being considered as therapeutic targets." "Historically, CBD has shown promise as both an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent in in vivo model systems of eye disease," stated Soumyajit Majumdar, PhD, Professor of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Pharmacy at the university and lead scientist of the ophthalmology program. "Potential uses for this analog of CBD include uveitis and dry eye syndrome in the anterior compartment of the eye, and diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration in the posterior compartment. We look forward to further formulation refinement of this molecule into a form that is optimized for development as a commercialized drug." "With an evolving portfolio of proprietary cannabinoid-based candidates, Nemus intends to seek pharmaceutical corporate partners to co-develop these assets," stated Dr. Murphy. Our portfolio of candidates is designed to leverage the potential pleiotropic benefits of cannabinoids across a variety of conditions, including: "We look forward to presenting this collection of data, as well as our anti-infective platform, at upcoming scientific meetings in 2017." This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the potential benefits of NB1111, NB1222, NB2111, and NB2222 as well as the timing of our near term, intermediate term and long term goals. Such statements and other statements in this press release that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on management's current expectations and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price could be materially negatively affected. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology including "goal," "focus," "aims," "believes," "can," "could," "challenge," "predictable," "will," or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. We operate in a rapidly changing environment and new risks emerge from time to time. As a result, it is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements the Company may make. Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially include, among others, our capital resources, uncertainty regarding the results of future testing and development efforts and other risks that are described in the Risk Factors section of NEMUS's most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as expressly required by law, NEMUS disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California, focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for significant unmet medical needs in global markets. Utilizing certain proprietary technology licensed from the University of Mississippi, NEMUS is working to develop novel ways to deliver cannabinoid-based drugs for specific indications, with the aim of optimizing the clinical effects of such drugs, while limiting the potential adverse events. NEMUS' strategy will explore the use of natural and synthetic compounds, alone or in combination. The Company is led by a highly qualified team of executives with decades of biopharmaceutical experience and significant background in early-stage drug development.


COSTA MESA, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2016 / NEMUS Bioscience, Inc. (OTCQB: NMUS) announced that an analog of CBD, developed by the University of Mississippi and formulated as an eye drop, was shown to enter the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye in animal models. Conversely, standard CBD, studied in parallel experiments, had negligible ocular concentrations. Nemus believes that this CBD analog, that is being developed as Nemus drug candidate NB2222 for the treatment and/or management of eye diseases, could have clinical utility across a spectrum of eye pathology, particularly those associated with the posterior compartment of the eye. Brian Murphy, M.D., M.B.A., Nemus CEO and Chief Medical Officer commented, "CBD has long been associated with the neuroprotective attributes of the cannabinoid family of molecules, but its bioavailability and pharmacokinetics can be less than optimal with oral administration. Nemus, through its relationship with the University of Mississippi, is focused on developing second- and third-generation cannabinoid molecules that can be customized to specific disease states. We believe NB2222 supplements our cannabinoid-based ophthalmology platform and has the potential to address diseases in multiple chambers of the eye." "Cannabinoid molecules, as a class, hold great potential and we are working with Nemus to create re-engineered versions of those molecules to enhance the therapeutic profile of these compounds," stated Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, professor at the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi. "Our shared vision is to further grow the library of cannabinoids currently being considered as therapeutic targets." "Historically, CBD has shown promise as both an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent in in vivo model systems of eye disease," stated Soumyajit Majumdar, PhD, Professor of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Pharmacy at the university and lead scientist of the ophthalmology program. "Potential uses for this analog of CBD include uveitis and dry eye syndrome in the anterior compartment of the eye, and diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration in the posterior compartment. We look forward to further formulation refinement of this molecule into a form that is optimized for development as a commercialized drug." "With an evolving portfolio of proprietary cannabinoid-based candidates, Nemus intends to seek pharmaceutical corporate partners to co-develop these assets," stated Dr. Murphy. Our portfolio of candidates is designed to leverage the potential pleiotropic benefits of cannabinoids across a variety of conditions, including: "We look forward to presenting this collection of data, as well as our anti-infective platform, at upcoming scientific meetings in 2017." This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements about the potential benefits of NB1111, NB1222, NB2111, and NB2222 as well as the timing of our near term, intermediate term and long term goals. Such statements and other statements in this press release that are not descriptions of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on management's current expectations and assumptions and are subject to risks and uncertainties. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, our business, operating results, financial condition and stock price could be materially negatively affected. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology including "goal," "focus," "aims," "believes," "can," "could," "challenge," "predictable," "will," or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. We operate in a rapidly changing environment and new risks emerge from time to time. As a result, it is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements the Company may make. Risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially include, among others, our capital resources, uncertainty regarding the results of future testing and development efforts and other risks that are described in the Risk Factors section of NEMUS's most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as expressly required by law, NEMUS disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company, headquartered in Costa Mesa, California, focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for significant unmet medical needs in global markets. Utilizing certain proprietary technology licensed from the University of Mississippi, NEMUS is working to develop novel ways to deliver cannabinoid-based drugs for specific indications, with the aim of optimizing the clinical effects of such drugs, while limiting the potential adverse events. NEMUS' strategy will explore the use of natural and synthetic compounds, alone or in combination. The Company is led by a highly qualified team of executives with decades of biopharmaceutical experience and significant background in early-stage drug development.

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