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News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

2016 global baby and child proofing products market research says one of latest trends in the market is product innovation in proofing products for electrical appliances. Busy lifestyles and the need for effective and convenient options have encouraged baby and child proofing manufacturers to come up with products that suit the needs of present day parents. The electric products are the major part of once everyday lives and almost all the rooms in the house would be having power outlets, extension leads, phone chargers, computer cables and many more. According to the National Fire Protection Association, approximately 2,400 kids suffer from severe shock and burns in the US caused by items being poked into the slots receptacles. Most of the electrical receptacle is open which allows the babies to poke the object inside causing various chances of accidents. Complete report on baby and child proofing products market spread across 55 pages, analysing 5 major companies and providing 27 data exhibits now available at http://www.sandlerresearch.org/global-baby-and-child-proofing-products-market-2016-2020.html. This analyst forecast the global baby and child proofing products market to grow at a CAGR of 6.96% during the period 2016-2020. According to the baby and child proofing products market report, one of the primary drivers in the market is parents hiring child safety specialists. According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, every year 20%-25% of the children sustain an injury which is severe enough for medical aid, or bed rest. Annually, the statistics of injury and deaths to infants and babies in the home are increasing. Almost 80% of all the child deaths occur at home, due to burning, poisoning, choking or drowning. The specialty stores segment accounted for the major market shares and dominated the child and baby safety products market. Owing to the preference of customers to purchase baby and child care products from stores that offer products specifically for children, the recent years witnessed a rapid increase in the number of specialty stores. Babies "R" Us and FirstCry are some of the major players in baby and child proofing products market segment. Europe will be the major revenue contributor to the baby and child proofing products market throughout the next four years. Factors such as campaigns run by the local governments to ensure the safety of the babies and kids, product innovations, and the rise in number of child births, will drive the baby and child proofing products market growth prospects. The following companies are the key players in the global baby and child proofing products market: Cardinal Gates, Dorel Juvenile, Dreambaby, KidCo, and Munchkin. Other prominent vendors in the market are: ClevaMama, DEX PRODUCTS, Evenflo, KidKusion, Mommy's Helper, North States, Prince Lionheart, Regalo Baby, and Summer Infant. Order a copy of Global Baby and Child Proofing Products Market 2016-2020 report @ http://www.sandlerresearch.org/purchase?rname=62448. Global Baby and Child Proofing Products Market 2016-2020, have been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. This report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global baby and child proofing products market for 2016-2020. To calculate the market size, the report considers the revenue generated from the retail sales of baby and child proofing products for children aged 0-4 years. Another related report is Global Baby Warming Devices Market 2016-2020, technical improvements in designs will be a key driver for market growth. Technological innovations have led to the development of new products in the healthcare industry. Some products have been developed as per the needs of neonates. Infant warmers such as Lullaby Warmer by GE Healthcare have shown clinical and economic benefits. The equipment provides 69% faster warm-up than conventional devices, offers uniform distribution of heat, and ensures comfortable positioning of the baby. Browse complete report @ http://www.sandlerresearch.org/global-baby-warming-devices-market-2016-2020.html. Explore other new reports on Consumer Goods Market @ http://www.sandlerresearch.org/market-research/consumer-goods. SandlerResearch.org is your go-to source for all market research needs. Our database includes thousands of market research reports from over multiple leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over several micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports.


Gilchrist J.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Ballesteros M.F.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Parker E.M.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | Year: 2012

Background: Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in the United States for persons aged 1-19 years and the fifth leading cause of death for newborns and infants aged <1 year. This report describes 10-year trends in unintentional injury deaths among persons aged 0-19 years. Methods: CDC analyzed 2000-2009 mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System by age group, sex, race/ethnicity, injury mechanism, and state. Results: From 2000 to 2009, the overall annual unintentional injury death rate decreased 29%, from 15.5 to 11.0 per 100,000 population, accounting for 9,143 deaths in 2009. The rate decreased among all age groups except newborns and infants aged <1 year; in this age group, rates increased from 23.1 to 27.7 per 100,000 primarily as a result of an increase in reported suffocations. The poisoning death rate among teens aged 15-19 years nearly doubled, from 1.7 to 3.3 per 100,000, in part because of an increase in prescription drug overdoses (e.g., opioid pain relievers). Childhood motor vehicle traffic-related death rates declined 41%; however, these deaths remain the leading cause of unintentional injury death. Among states, unintentional injury death rates varied widely, from 4.0 to 25.1 per 100,000 in 2009. Conclusions and Implications for Public Health Practice: Although the annual rate is declining, unintentional injury remains the leading cause of death among children and adolescents in the United States, led by motor vehicle traffic-related deaths. Death rates from infant suffocation and teen poisoning are increasing. The 2012 National Action Plan for Child Injury Prevention provides actions in surveillance, research, communication, education, health care, and public policy to guide efforts in saving lives by reducing injuries.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Johns Hopkins investigators report that their analysis of a national database representing more than 1 billion emergency department visits shows that over a recent eight-year period, nothing much has changed in the rates of unsuccessful suicide attempts, or in the age, gender, seasonal timing or means used by those who tried to take their lives in the United States. The findings, published in Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences on Nov. 17, also affirm that a significant majority of those who attempted suicide had a concurrent mental disorder, that the attempts as documented in emergency department visits were more frequent during the late spring, that more females attempted suicide than males and that males were more likely than females to employ violent methods, such as hanging or use of a firearm, in their attempts. "What stood out to us the most is that while the rate of fatal suicide has increased, the overall rate of nonfatal suicide attempts has not changed much over the years, nor have the patterns -- age, sex, seasonality, mechanism, etc. -- changed much," says Joseph Canner, M.H.S., interim co-director of the Johns Hopkins Surgery Center for Outcomes Research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the paper's first author. He added: "An optimist would say this is good news, given that there was a major recession early in the study period and given all of the attention highlighting the despair of middle-aged men with no job prospects, leading to drug use and suicide. A pessimist would say that this report is bad news because the rate is unchanged despite all of the preventive interventions and emphasis on mental health over the past decade. Perhaps the truth is that these two forces are counterbalancing each other." According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is the 10th most common cause of death in the U.S. and a top five cause among those between 10 and 54 years old. Canner says that although multiple analyses of suicide attempt-related emergency department visits have been done before, estimates can vary widely due to different numbers of hospitals sampled and time frames from which samples were drawn. The current study evaluated data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all-payer emergency department database in the U.S. produced by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, which represents approximately 128 million emergency department visits annually. Data from Jan. 1, 2006, to Dec. 31, 2013, yielded a total of 3,567,084 suicide attempt-related emergency department visits from people ages 10 and older. Canner and his team identified those admitted for suicide and self-inflicted injury by examining in internationally defined classification of diagnostic codes called ICD-9-CM external cause of injury codes (E-codes), used for insurance billing purposes, in each NEDS record. Each NEDS record can include up to four E-codes and up to 15 diagnosis codes with additional information about type and location of injury, and the presence of concurrent mental disorders. The team found that emergency department visits for the relevant codes peaked for those between ages 15 and 19 -- a rate of 351 per 100,000 people -- and plateaued between ages 35 and 45. This pattern held true for both males and females. While females accounted for 57.4 percent of suicide-related visits and males accounted for 42.6 percent, males are known to more likely succeed in their attempts, thus reducing their percentages in the current evaluation of unsuccessful attempts. According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, suicide attempts overall result in a 14.1 percent fatality rate for males and 3.1 percent rate for females, probably because males were 64 percent more likely than females to use a violent method. Violent means included cutting, hanging, use of a firearm, jumping, crashing a vehicle, burns and electrocution. Nonviolent means included poisoning, drowning and exposure to extreme cold. Of the visits evaluated, 28.6 percent (899,331) used a violent mechanism of injury. Poisoning was the most common means of injury, which accounted for 66.5 percent (2,241,025) of all attempts, the researchers found, with cutting or piercing the second most common, accounting for 22.1 percent (744,957) of all cases. Of all poisoning cases, tranquilizers and other psychotropic drugs were most commonly used, accounting for 37.4 percent (838,876) of all poisoning cases. The study also confirmed that suicide attempts peak during spring. Canner's team found that 8.9 percent of all visits occurred in May, a 4.6 percent rise above the average number of visits per day for the entire year. Other peak months included March (1.05 percent above average), April (3.35 percent above average) and September (2.2 percent above average). A drop in attempted suicide-related visits occurred in November and December, with visits 2.53 and 7.87 percentages below average, respectively. Finally, the team discovered that the majority of those admitted for suicide attempt-related injuries had a concurrent mental disorder -- 82.7 percent, or 2,949,432, of all those whose records were evaluated. Of these, 42.1 percent (1,500,624) had a mood disorder, 12.1 percent (432,605) had a substance-related disorder, 8.9 percent (317,224) had an alcohol-related disorder and 6.4 percent (227,964) had anxiety. Canner cautions that records analyses like the one done by his team have their limitations and weaknesses. For example, he notes, no one truly knows the total number of people with mental illness or their absolute risk of attempted suicide, nor is there a way to know how a diagnosis of mental illness was made, such as whether it was based on a thorough examination by a psychiatrist, past medical history or a cursory exam by emergency department staff members. Canner also noted that the study was limited to E-codes that are used primarily for administrative purposes, and that the collection and reporting of these codes varies from state to state. He says the study's findings are comparable in outcome to previous studies, and that the NEDS data set allowed for more in-depth analyses of patterns across age, sex, season and mechanism than previous studies have. Other authors on this study include Katherine Giuliano, Shalini Selvarajah and Edward Hammond of The Johns Hopkins University, and Eric Schneider of Harvard Medical School.


Paulozzi L.J.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Mack K.A.,Research and Practice Integration | Hockenberry J.M.,Emory University
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | Year: 2014

Background: Overprescribing of opioid pain relievers (OPR) can result in multiple adverse health outcomes, including fatal overdoses. Interstate variation in rates of prescribing OPR and other prescription drugs prone to abuse, such as benzodiazepines, might indicate areas where prescribing patterns need further evaluation.Methods: CDC analyzed a commercial database (IMS Health) to assess the potential for improved prescribing of OPR and other drugs. CDC calculated state rates and measures of variation for OPR, long-acting/extended-release (LA/ER) OPR, high-dose OPR, and benzodiazepines.Results: In 2012, prescribers wrote 82.5 OPR and 37.6 benzodiazepine prescriptions per 100 persons in the United States. State rates varied 2.7-fold for OPR and 3.7-fold for benzodiazepines. For both OPR and benzodiazepines, rates were higher in the South census region, and three Southern states were two or more standard deviations above the mean. Rates for LA/ER and high-dose OPR were highest in the Northeast. Rates varied 22-fold for one type of OPR, oxymorphone.Conclusions: Factors accounting for the regional variation are unknown. Such wide variations are unlikely to be attributable to underlying differences in the health status of the population. High rates indicate the need to identify prescribing practices that might not appropriately balance pain relief and patient safety.Implications for Public Health: State policy makers might reduce the harms associated with abuse of prescription drugs by implementing changes that will make the prescribing of these drugs more cautious and more consistent with clinical recommendations. © 2014, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. All rights reserved.


Karch D.L.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Surveillance summaries (Washington, D.C. : 2002) | Year: 2012

An estimated 50,000 persons die annually in the United States as a result of violence-related injuries. This report summarizes data from CDC's National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) regarding violent deaths from 16 U.S. states for 2009. Results are reported by sex, age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, location of injury, method of injury, circumstances of injury, and other selected characteristics. 2009. NVDRS collects data regarding violent deaths obtained from death certificates, coroner/medical examiner reports, and law enforcement reports. NVDRS data collection began in 2003 with seven states (Alaska, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, South Carolina, and Virginia) participating; six states (Colorado, Georgia, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin) joined in 2004, four (California, Kentucky, New Mexico, and Utah) in 2005, and two (Ohio and Michigan) in 2010, for a total of 19 states. This report includes data from 16 states that collected statewide data in 2009. California is excluded because data were collected in only four counties. Ohio and Michigan are excluded because data collection did not begin until 2010. For 2009, a total of 15,981 fatal incidents involving 16,418 deaths were captured by NVDRS in the 16 states included in this report. The majority (60.6%) of deaths were suicides, followed by homicides and deaths involving legal intervention (i.e., deaths caused by police and other persons with legal authority to use deadly force, excluding legal executions) (24.7%), deaths of undetermined intent (14.2%), and unintentional firearm deaths (0.5%). Suicides occurred at higher rates among males, non-Hispanic whites, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and persons aged 45-54 years. Suicides occurred most often in a house or apartment and involved the use of firearms. Suicides were preceded primarily by mental health, intimate partner, or physical health problems or by a crisis during the previous 2 weeks. Homicides occurred at higher rates among males and persons aged 20-24 years; rates were highest among non-Hispanic black males. The majority of homicides involved the use of a firearm and occurred in a house or apartment or on a street/highway. Homicides were preceded primarily by arguments and interpersonal conflicts or in conjunction with another crime. Characteristics associated with other manners of death, circumstances preceding death, and special populations also are highlighted in this report. This report provides a detailed summary of data from NVDRS for 2009. The results indicate that violent deaths resulting from self-inflicted or interpersonal violence disproportionately affected adults aged <55 years, males, and certain racial/ethnic minority populations. For homicides and suicides, relationship problems, interpersonal conflicts, mental health problems, and recent crises were among the primary factors that might have precipitated the fatal injuries. Because additional information might be reported subsequently as participating states update their findings, the data provided in this report are preliminary. For the occurrence of violent deaths in the United States to be better understood and ultimately prevented, accurate, timely, and comprehensive surveillance data are necessary. NVDRS data can be used to monitor the occurrence of violence-related fatal injuries and assist public health authorities in the development, implementation, and evaluation of programs and policies to reduce and prevent violent deaths at the national, state, and local levels. The continued development and expansion of NVDRS is essential to CDC's efforts to reduce the personal, familial, and societal costs of violence. Additional efforts are needed to increase the number of states participating in NVDRS, with an ultimate goal of full national representation.


Mack K.A.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Jones C.M.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Paulozzi L.J.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | Year: 2013

Background: Overdose deaths have increased steadily over the past decade. This report describes drug-related deaths and emergency department (ED) visits among women. Methods: CDC analyzed rates of fatal drug overdoses and drug misuse- or abuse-related ED visits among women using data from the National Vital Statistics System (1999-2010) and the Drug Abuse Warning Network (2004-2010). Results: In 2010, a total of 15,323 deaths among women were attributed to drug overdose, a rate of 9.8 per 100,000 population. Deaths from opioid pain relievers (OPRs) increased fivefold between 1999 and 2010 for women; OPR deaths among men increased 3.6 times. In 2010, there were 943,365 ED visits by women for drug misuse or abuse. The highest ED visit rates were for cocaine or heroin (147.2 per 100,000 population), benzodiazepines (134.6), and OPR (129.6). ED visits related to misuse or abuse of OPR among women more than doubled between 2004 and 2010. Conclusions: Although more men die from drug overdoses than women, the percentage increase in deaths since 1999 is greater among women. More women have died each year from drug overdoses than from motor vehicle-related injuries since 2007. Deaths and ED visits related to OPR continue to increase among women. The prominent involvement of psychotherapeutic drugs, such as benzodiazepines, among overdoses provides insight for prevention opportunities. Implications for Public Health Practice: Health-care providers should follow guidelines for responsible prescribing, including screening and monitoring for substance abuse and mental health problems, when prescribing OPR. Health-care providers who treat women for pain should use their state's prescription drug monitoring program and regularly screen patients for psychological disorders and use of psychotherapeutic drugs, with or without a prescription.


Paulozzi L.J.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Mack K.A.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Jones C.M.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | Year: 2012

Background: Vital statistics data suggest that the opioid pain reliever (OPR) methadone is involved in one third of OPR-related overdose deaths, but it accounts for only a few percent of OPR prescriptions. Methods: CDC analyzed rates of fatal methadone overdoses and sales nationally during 1999-2010 and rates of overdose death for methadone compared with rates for other major opioids in 13 states for 2009. Results: Methadone overdose deaths and sales rates in the United States peaked in 2007. In 2010, methadone accounted for between 4.5% and 18.5% of the opioids distributed by state. Methadone was involved in 31.4% of OPR deaths in the 13 states. It accounted for 39.8% of single-drug OPR deaths. The overdose death rate for methadone was significantly greater than that for other OPR for multidrug and single-drug deaths. Conclusions: Methadone remains a drug that contributes disproportionately to the excessive number of opioid pain reliever overdoses and associated medical and societal costs. Implications for Public Health Practice: Health-care providers who choose to prescribe methadone should have substantial experience with its use and follow consensus guidelines for appropriate opioid prescribing. Providers should use methadone as an analgesic only for conditions where benefit outweighs risk to patients and society. Methadone and other extended-release opioids should not be used for mild pain, acute pain, "breakthrough" pain, or on an as-needed basis. For chronic noncancer pain, methadone should not be considered a drug of first choice by prescribers or insurers.


Shults R.A.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Olsen E.O.,National Center for HIV AIDS
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | Year: 2012

Background: Although every state prohibits persons aged <21 years from driving with any measurable amount of blood alcohol, many young persons still drink and drive. Additionally, fatal crash data indicate that most teen drivers with positive (>0.00%) blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) who are involved in fatal crashes have BACs ≥0.08%, the level designated as illegal for adult drivers. Methods: CDC analyzed data from the 1991-2011 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS) to describe the trend in prevalence of drinking and driving (defined as driving one or more times when they had been drinking alcohol during the 30 days before the survey) among U.S. high school students aged ≥16 years. The 2011 national YRBS data were used to describe selected subgroup differences in drinking and driving, and 2011 state YRBSs data were used to describe drinking and driving prevalence in 41 states. Results: During 1991-2011, the national prevalence of self-reported drinking and driving among high school students aged ≥16 years declined by 54%, from 22.3% to 10.3%. In 2011, 84.6% of students who drove after drinking also binge drank. Drinking and driving prevalence varied threefold across 41 states, from 4.6% in Utah to 14.5% in North Dakota; higher prevalences were clustered among states in the upper Midwest and along the Gulf Coast. Conclusions: Although substantial progress has been made during the past 2 decades to reduce drinking and driving among teens, in 2011, one in 10 students aged ≥16 years reported driving after drinking during the past 30 days. Most students who drove after drinking alcohol also binge drank. Implications for Public Health Practice: Effective interventions to reduce drinking and driving among teens include enforcement of minimum legal drinking age laws, zero tolerance laws (i.e., no alcohol consumption allowed before driving for persons aged <21 years), and graduated driver licensing systems.


Paulozzi L.J.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Jones C.M.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Mack K.A.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control | Rudd R.A.,National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | Year: 2011

Background: Overdose deaths involving opioid pain relievers (OPR), also known as opioid analgesics, have increased and now exceed deaths involving heroin and cocaine combined. This report describes the use and abuse of OPR by state. Methods: CDC analyzed rates of fatal OPR overdoses, nonmedical use, sales, and treatment admissions. Results: In 2008, drug overdoses in the United States caused 36,450 deaths. OPR were involved in 14,800 deaths (73.8%) of the 20,044 prescription drug overdose deaths. Death rates varied fivefold by state. States with lower death rates had lower rates of nonmedical use of OPR and OPR sales. During 1999--2008, overdose death rates, sales, and substance abuse treatment admissions related to OPR all increased substantially. Conclusions: The epidemic of overdoses of OPR has continued to worsen. Wide variation among states in the nonmedical use of OPR and overdose rates cannot be explained by underlying demographic differences in state populations but is related to wide variations in OPR prescribing. Implications for Public Health Practice: Health-care providers should only use OPRs in carefully screened and monitored patients when non-OPR treatments are insufficient to manage pain. Insurers and prescription drug monitoring programs can identify and take action to reduce both inappropriate and illegal prescribing. Third-party payers can limit reimbursement in ways that reduce inappropriate prescribing, discourage efforts to obtain OPR from multiple health-care providers, and improve clinical care. Changes in state laws that focus on the prescribing practices of health-care providers might reduce prescription drug abuse and overdoses while still allowing safe and effective pain treatment.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Baby and Child Proofing Products Market 2016-2020" report to their offering. The global baby and child proofing products market to grow at a CAGR of 6.96% during the period 2016-2020. The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global baby and child proofing products market for 2016-2020. To calculate the market size, the report considers the revenue generated from the retail sales of baby and child proofing products for children aged 0-4 years. One of latest trends in the market is product innovation in proofing products for electrical appliances. Busy lifestyles and the need for effective and convenient options have encouraged baby and child proofing manufacturers to come up with products that suit the needs of present day parents. The electric products are the major part of once everyday lives and almost all the rooms in the house would be having power outlets, extension leads, phone chargers, computer cables and many more. According to the report, one of the primary drivers in the market is parents hiring child safety specialists. According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, every year 20%-25% of the children sustain an injury which is severe enough for medical aid, or bed rest. Annually, the statistics of injury and deaths to infants and babies in the home are increasing. Almost 80% of all the child deaths occur at home, due to burning, poisoning, choking or drowning. Most of the baby and child injuries could have been prevented with a thorough consultation and safety implementation with a baby-proofing expert. Key vendors Key Topics Covered: Part 01: Executive summary Part 02: Scope of the report Part 03: Market research methodology Part 04: Introduction Part 05: Market landscape Part 06: Market segmentation by distribution channel Part 07: Market segmentation by product Part 08: Geographical segmentation Part 09: Key leading countries Part 10: Market drivers Part 11: Impact of drivers Part 12: Market challenges Part 13: Impact of drivers and challenges Part 14: Market trends Part 15: Vendor landscape Part 16: Key vendor analysis Part 17: Appendix For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/fq7trq/global_baby_and Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716

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