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Hull B.,National Center for Immunisation Research and Surveillance
New South Wales public health bulletin | Year: 2012

This annual report, the third in the series, documents trends in immunisation coverage in NSW for children, adolescents and the elderly, to the end of 2011. Data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register, the NSW School Immunisation Program and the NSW Population Health Survey were used to calculate various measures of population coverage. During 2011, greater than 90% coverage was maintained for children at 12 and 24 months of age. For children at 5 years of age the improvement seen in 2010 was sustained, with coverage at or near 90%. For adolescents, there was improved coverage for all doses of human papillomavirus vaccine, both doses of hepatitis B vaccine, varicella vaccine and the dose of diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis given to school attendees in Years 7 and 10. Pneumococcal vaccination coverage in the elderly has been steadily rising, although it has remained lower than the influenza coverage estimates. This report provides trends in immunisation coverage in NSW across the age spectrum. The inclusion of coverage estimates for the pneumococcal conjugate, varicella and meningococcal C vaccines in the official coverage assessments for 'fully immunised' in 2013 is a welcome initiative. Source


Wood N.J.,National Center for Immunisation Research and Surveillance
New South Wales public health bulletin | Year: 2010

Specialist immunisation clinics review and manage children who have experienced an adverse event following immunisation and provide advice to parents and health care providers regarding the revaccination of these children. Information collected by these clinics supplement passive surveillance data and allow the investigation of suspected safety signals associated with the delivery of immunisation programs. This paper reviews the role and experience of the Immunisation Adverse Events Clinic at The Children's Hospital at Westmead and identifies areas for development. Source


Hull B.,National Center for Immunisation Research and Surveillance
New South Wales public health bulletin | Year: 2011

This annual report, the second in the series, documents trends in immunisation coverage in NSW for children, adolescents and the elderly, to the end of 2010. Methods: Data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register, the NSW School Immunisation Program and the NSW Population Health Survey were used to calculate various measures of population coverage, coverage for Aboriginal children and vaccination timeliness for all children. Results: Over 90% coverage has been reached for children at 12 and 24 months of age. For children at 5 years of age there was an improvement during 2010 in timeliness for vaccines due at 4 years and coverage almost reached 90%. Delayed receipt of vaccines is still an issue for Aboriginal children. For adolescents, there is good coverage for the first and second doses of human papillomavirus vaccine and the dose of diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis. The pneumococcal vaccination rate in the elderly has been steadily rising, although it has remained lower than the influenza coverage estimates. Conclusion: Completion of the recommended immunisation schedule at the earliest appropriate age should be the next public health goal at both the state and local health district level. Official coverage assessments for 'fully immunised' should include the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate and meningococcal C vaccines, and wider dissemination should be considered. Source


Mahajan D.,National Center for Immunisation Research and Surveillance
New South Wales public health bulletin | Year: 2011

This report summarises Australian passive surveillance data for adverse events following immunisation in NSW for 2010. Analysis of de-identified information on all adverse events following immunisation reported to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. 424 adverse events following immunisation were reported for vaccines administered in 2010; this is 6% lower than 2009 but 24% higher than 2008 and the second highest number since 2003. A total of 274 (65%) adverse events involved seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Reports were predominantly of mild transient events: the most commonly reported reactions were fever, allergic reaction, injection site reaction, malaise and headache. Only 9% of the reported adverse events were serious in nature, including eight reports of febrile convulsions in children following seasonal influenza vaccine. The large number of reports in 2010 is attributable to the high rates of fever and febrile convulsions in children after vaccination with 2010 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine, as well as pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza vaccine. Source


Hull B.,National Center for Immunisation Research and Surveillance
New South Wales public health bulletin | Year: 2010

This is the first in a series of annual immunisation coverage reports that document trends in NSW for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register data, including overall coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines. This report includes data up to and including 2009. Data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register, the NSW Health Survey and the NSW School Immunisation Program were used to calculate various measures of population coverage relating to childhood vaccines, adult influenza and pneumococcal vaccines and adolescent vaccination, respectively. Immunise Australia Program targets have been reached for children at 12 and 24 months of age but not for children at 5 years of age. Delayed receipt of vaccines is an issue for vaccines recommended for Aboriginal children. Pneumococcal vaccination in the elderly has been steadily rising, although it has remained lower than the influenza coverage estimates. For adolescents, there is better coverage for the first and second doses of human papillomavirus vaccine and the dose of dTpa than for varicella. This comprehensive analysis provides important baseline data for NSW against which future reports can be compared to monitor progress in improving immunisation coverage. Immunisation at the earliest appropriate age should be a public health goal for countries such as Australia where high levels of vaccine coverage at milestone ages have been achieved. Source

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