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Jacobs D.E.,National Center for Healthy Housing
Journal of public health management and practice : JPHMP | Year: 2010

Subject matter experts systematically reviewed evidence on the effectiveness of specific housing interventions in improving health. The panelists reviewed housing interventions associated with exposure to biological and chemical agents, structural injury hazards, and community-level interventions. Intervention studies were grouped together according to recommendations in the Guide to Community Preventive Services, which identifies similarities in the type of intervention, its delivery and setting, and the target population. Review panelists found that 11 interventions had sufficient evidence of effectiveness, 15 required more field evaluation, 19 needed formative research, and 7 either had no evidence of effectiveness or were ineffective. Although many housing conditions are associated with adverse health outcomes, sufficient evidence now shows that specific housing interventions can improve certain health outcomes. The results of these evidence reviews can inform a robust agenda for widespread implementation and further research. This article highlights the project's research methods and summary findings, and its companion articles detail the evidence reviews for specific housing interventions. Source


Nevin R.,National Center for Healthy Housing
Energy Policy | Year: 2010

This paper describes an energy-efficient housing stimulus strategy that can: (1) quickly provide large-scale job creation; (2) reduce home energy bills by 30-50% with associated reductions in emissions and energy assistance spending; (3) stabilize home values and reduce foreclosure inventory; (4) help to eliminate childhood lead poisoning; and (5) implement regulatory reforms that highlight market incentives for cost effective energy efficiency and alternative home energy investments. These benefits, far in excess of costs, can be achieved by combining "lead-safe window replacement" with other weatherization activities and simple regulatory and market reforms. This strategy can help to coordinate American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding for energy efficiency, the $75 billion Making Home Affordable plan to reduce foreclosures, and the recently announced partnership between the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to streamline weatherization efforts and spur job creation. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Gottesfeld P.,Occupational Knowledge International | Jacobs D.E.,National Center for Healthy Housing
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2016

Turner's paper emphasizes “oral bioaccessibility” instead of focusing solely on total lead content. There is no evidence that solubility testing for lead levels in paint correlates with absorption or blood lead levels in exposed children. There are many considerations in determining exposure hazards to paint that are not evaluated in assessing solubility. Although we strongly support the conclusions and recommendations of the study, we are concerned that by reporting “oral bioaccessibility” others will focus on solubility in developing regulatory standards for lead levels in paint or in conducting exposure assessments. Standards for lead in paint should continue to be based on total lead content, not “oral bioaccessibility.” © 2016 Elsevier B.V. Source


Brown M.J.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Jacobs D.E.,National Center for Healthy Housing
Public Health Reports | Year: 2011

Objectives. We examined the relationship between self-reported inadequate residential natural light and risk for depression or falls among adults aged 18 years or older. Methods. Generalized estimating equations were used to calculate the odds of depression or falls in participants with self-reported inadequate natural residential light vs. those reporting adequate light (n?6,017) using data from the World Health Organization's Large Analysis and Review of European Housing and Health Survey, a large cross-sectional study of housing and health in representative populations from eight European cities. Results. Participants reporting inadequate natural light in their dwellings were 1.4 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2,1.7) as likely to report depression and 1.5 times (95% CI 1.2, 1.9) as likely to report a fall compared with those satisfied with their dwelling's light. After adjustment for major confounders, the likelihood of depression changed slightly, while the likelihood of a fall increased to 2.5 (95% CI 1.5, 4.2). Conclusion. Self-reported inadequate light in housing is independently associated with depression and falls. Increasing light in housing, a relatively inexpensive intervention, may improve two distinct health conditions. © 2011 Association of Schools of Public Health. Source


Lindberg R.A.,National Center for Healthy Housing
Journal of public health management and practice : JPHMP | Year: 2010

A panel of subject matter experts systematically reviewed evidence linking neighborhood-level housing interventions, such as housing programs or policies, to health outcomes. One of the 10 interventions reviewed--the Housing Choice Voucher Program--had sufficient evidence for implementation or expansion. The evidence showed that voucher holders are less likely to suffer from overcrowding, malnutrition due to food insecurity, and concentrated neighborhood poverty than non-voucher holders. Of the other reviewed interventions, 2 needed more field evaluation and 7 needed more formative research. None were determined to be ineffective. Although many of the reviewed interventions lacked sufficient evidence for widespread implementation solely based on their health benefits, this evidence review shows that many interventions positively affect other areas of social, economic, and environmental well-being. Efforts to improve neighborhood environments and to maintain and increase the number of affordable housing units are critical to ensuring safe, healthy, and affordable housing for all people in the United States. Given that people of color disproportionately reside in high-poverty neighborhoods, neighborhood-level interventions may be particularly important in efforts to eliminate health disparities. Source

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