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Although the absolute difference in U.S. county-level cardiovascular disease mortality rates have declined substantially over the past 35 years for both ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, large differences remain, according to a study published by JAMA. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the United State despite declines in the national cardiovascular disease mortality rate between 1980 and 2015. Mortality rates for smaller regions of the country, such as counties, can differ substantially from the national average; these differences have important implications for local and national health policy. Gregory A. Roth, M.D., M.P.H., of the Division of Cardiology, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues used death records from the National Center for Health Statistics and population counts from the U.S. Census Bureau, the National Center for Health Statistics, and the Human Mortality Database from 1980 through 2014 to estimate mortality rates from cardiovascular diseases by U.S. county (n = 3,110). The researchers found that the mortality rate for cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. declined from 507 deaths per 100,000 persons in 1980 to 253 deaths per 100,000 persons in 2014, a relative decline of 50 percent. In 2014, cardiovascular diseases accounted for more than 846,000 deaths. There were substantial differences between county ischemic heart disease and stroke mortality rates; smaller differences were found for diseases of the myocardium, atrial fibrillation, aortic and peripheral arterial disease, rheumatic heart disease, and endocarditis. The largest concentration of counties with high cardiovascular disease mortality extended from southeastern Oklahoma along the Mississippi River Valley to eastern Kentucky. Several cardiovascular disease conditions were clustered substantially outside the South, including atrial fibrillation (Northwest), aortic aneurysm (Midwest), and endocarditis (Mountain West and Alaska). The lowest cardiovascular mortality rates were found in the counties surrounding San Francisco, central Colorado, northern Nebraska, central Minnesota, northeastern Virginia, and southern Florida. Several limitations of the study are noted in the article, including that vital statistics data and census population data were used to calculate mortality rates and both of these sources are subject to error because deaths and individuals within the population may be missed or allocated to the wrong county. "These findings suggest major efforts are still needed to reduce geographic variation in risk of death due to ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases," the authors write. For more details and to read the full study, please visit the For The Media website. Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc. Related material: The editorial, "Cardiovascular Mortality Differences- Place Matters," by Gary H. Gibbons, M.D., of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, and colleagues also is available at the For The Media website. To place an electronic embedded link to this study in your story This link will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

NEW YORK, NY, May 18, 2017--(T.A.O.) just announced its plan to accommodate at least one million new members over the next three months. T.A.O. provides a non-insurance health program that aggregates nine healthcare services into one comprehensive and easy to use package. The program includes Telemedicine, a Health Advocate, a Medication Advocacy Program (MAP), and six discount networks for dental, vision, hearing, prescription, diabetic supply, and vitamins.28.2 million Americans were uninsured in the first nine months of 2016 according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Now at least 24 million people may lose their insurance over the next decade according to the Congressional Budget Office. "The Access Organization was created to provide an affordable healthcare solution" says Vince Prezioso, CEO and Co-Founder. "We feel that we've accomplished that with a program that is comprehensive, and provides excellent medication access as well as great service." Members have access to 24/7 Board Certified Doctors over the phone or online video who can diagnose and prescribe medication, if necessary. You are able to speak with a doctor, and can even have a "face-time"-like experience with a doctor right from your phone, as well as send pictures if needed. To see a doctor, members have a Health Advisor service to research doctors, obtain the best rate possible, and even schedule the appointment for them. Advisors also arrange non-emergency surgical procedures, saving patients an average of 66% over the past year, as well as negotiate upcoming or outstanding medical bills with an average reduction rate of 50 to 70% over the past year as well. T.A.O. also gives members access to over 6,000 brand-name monthly maintenance drugs for $25.00 per month or any group of brand-name maintenance drugs for $45.00 per month. This is regardless of the retail cost of the medication. Over 60,000 other brands and generics are also available at pre-negotiated rates. The only additional fee is a one-time $25.00 registration once the member is matched with their medication and agrees to receive it."When people ask me how much this is, they really don't believe me," says Prezioso. The cost for a family isper month, and that includes all calls to the doctor and health advisor." The discounted rates will apply to the other services; dental, vision, hearing, prescriptions, diabetic supply, and vitamins. New members can sign up directly on the website, taomembers.com , and be active in three business days. You can also leave your information at bit.ly/2taoinfo and someone will reach you. To watch a brief two-minute video about the program, go to bit.ly/2taovideo . Vince's personal favorite is to direct new members to a webinar. He says, "It gives the best explanation of our product. I always say, give me ten minutes of your time, and I'll show you how we can save you and your family thousands of dollars." The webinar can be viewed at bit.ly/2learntao Prezioso had his own personal experience in the early days of developing The Access Organization when he was prescribed Vyvanse for ADD which was costing him $250.00 per month. He was able to get it through The Access Organization for $25.00 per month. "I saved about $8,000.00 in three years from my own program," he says. "And that doesn't include the costs and time I saved by calling doctors instead of going in for visits." Prezioso is excited about the mission of The Access Organization. He explains, "This company was designed and created to help people. I know what it's like not to have any healthcare options. I was there myself. Our goal has been to provide an option for the artist and the freelancer, but it looks like a lot more people are going to need us really soon."Founded in 2012, the mission of The Access Organization (T.A.O.) is to provide individuals and families access to a discount healthcare program that is easy to use, reliable, convenient, and delivers savings on a wide range of products and services. Visit www.TAOMembers.com for complete program information and taomembers.com/disclosures for disclosures.The Access Organization, LLC275 Madison Avenue, 6th FloorNew York, NY 10016Contact:Misty Schwartz323-570-1328


Although the absolute difference in U.S. county-level cardiovascular disease mortality rates have declined substantially over the past 35 years for both ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, large differences remain, according to a study published by JAMA. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the United State despite declines in the national cardiovascular disease mortality rate between 1980 and 2015. Mortality rates for smaller regions of the country, such as counties, can differ substantially from the national average; these differences have important implications for local and national health policy. Gregory A. Roth, M.D., M.P.H., of the Division of Cardiology, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues used death records from the National Center for Health Statistics and population counts from the U.S. Census Bureau, the National Center for Health Statistics, and the Human Mortality Database from 1980 through 2014 to estimate mortality rates from cardiovascular diseases by U.S. county (n = 3,110). The researchers found that the mortality rate for cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. declined from 507 deaths per 100,000 persons in 1980 to 253 deaths per 100,000 persons in 2014, a relative decline of 50 percent. In 2014, cardiovascular diseases accounted for more than 846,000 deaths. There were substantial differences between county ischemic heart disease and stroke mortality rates; smaller differences were found for diseases of the myocardium, atrial fibrillation, aortic and peripheral arterial disease, rheumatic heart disease, and endocarditis. The largest concentration of counties with high cardiovascular disease mortality extended from southeastern Oklahoma along the Mississippi River Valley to eastern Kentucky. Several cardiovascular disease conditions were clustered substantially outside the South, including atrial fibrillation (Northwest), aortic aneurysm (Midwest), and endocarditis (Mountain West and Alaska). The lowest cardiovascular mortality rates were found in the counties surrounding San Francisco, central Colorado, northern Nebraska, central Minnesota, northeastern Virginia, and southern Florida. Several limitations of the study are noted in the article, including that vital statistics data and census population data were used to calculate mortality rates and both of these sources are subject to error because deaths and individuals within the population may be missed or allocated to the wrong county. "These findings suggest major efforts are still needed to reduce geographic variation in risk of death due to ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases," the authors write.


Martin J.A.,National Center for Health Statistics
MMWR. Surveillance summaries : Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Surveillance summaries / CDC | Year: 2011

Preterm infants (those born at <37 completed weeks of gestation) are less likely to survive to their first birthday than infants delivered at higher gestational ages, and those who do survive, especially those born at the earlier end of the preterm spectrum, are more likely to suffer long-term disabilities than infants born at term. During 1981--2006, the U.S. preterm birth rate increased >30%, from 9.4% to 12.8% of all live births. Although lower during 2007 and 2008, the U.S. preterm birth rate remains higher than any year during 1981--2002.


Ogden C.L.,National Center for Health Statistics
National health statistics reports | Year: 2011

The high prevalence of obesity (defined by body mass index) among children and adolescents in the United States and elsewhere has prompted increased attention to body fat in childhood and adolescence. This report provides smoothed estimates of major percentiles of percentage body fat for boys and girls aged 8-19 years in the United States. Percentage body fat was obtained from whole-body, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans conducted during the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A nonparametric double-kernel method was employed to smooth percentile curves for the DXA data. The pattern of body fat development differs between boys and girls aged 8-19 years. In most age groups, girls have a higher percentage of body fat than boys. Among boys, there is a drop in body fat percentage in early adolescence that is especially pronounced at the higher percentiles. Among girls this pattern is not seen; percentage body fat increases slightly with age. These results provide a smoothed reference distribution of percentage body fat for U.S. children and adolescents aged 8-19 years.


MacDorman M.F.,National Center for Health Statistics
National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System | Year: 2010

OBJECTIVES: This report examines trends and characteristics of out-of-hospital and home births in the United States. METHODS: Descriptive tabulations of data are presented and interpreted. RESULTS: In 2006, there were 38,568 out-of-hospital births in the United States, including 24,970 home births and 10,781 births occurring in a freestanding birthing center. After a gradual decline from 1990 to 2004, the percentage of out-of-hospital births increased by 3% from 0.87% in 2004 to 0.90% in 2005 and 2006. A similar pattern was found for home births. After a gradual decline from 1990 to 2004, the percentage of home births increased by 5% to 0.59% in 2005 and remained steady in 2006. Compared with the U.S. average, home birth rates were higher for non-Hispanic white women, married women, women aged 25 and over, and women with several previous children. Home births were less likely than hospital births to be preterm, low birthweight, or multiple deliveries. The percentage of home births was 74% higher in rural counties of less than 100,000 population than in counties with a population size of 100,000 or more. The percentage of home births also varied widely by state; in Vermont and Montana more than 2% of births in 2005-2006 were home births, compared with less than 0.2% in Louisiana and Nebraska. About 61% of home births were delivered by midwives. Among midwife-delivered home births, one-fourth (27%) were delivered by certified nurse midwives, and nearly three-fourths (73%) were delivered by other midwives. DISCUSSION: Women may choose home birth for a variety of reasons, including a desire for a low-intervention birth in a familiar environment surrounded by family and friends and cultural or religious concerns. Lack of transportation in rural areas and cost factors may also play a role.


Dwyer L.L.,National Center for Health Statistics
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society | Year: 2013

To estimate infection prevalence and explore associated risk factors in nursing home (NH) residents, individuals receiving home health care (HHC), and individuals receiving hospice care. Cross-sectional. Nationally representative samples of 1,174 U.S. NHs in the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) and 1,036 U.S. HHC and hospice agencies in the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS). A nationally representative sample of 12,270 NH residents, 4,394 individuals receiving HHC, and 4,410 individuals receiving hospice care. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes were used to identify the presence of infection, including community-acquired infection and those acquired during earlier healthcare exposures. Unweighted response rates were 78% for the 2004 NHHS and 67% for the 2007 NHHCS. Approximately 12% of NH residents and 12% of individuals receiving HHC had an infection at the time of the survey interview, and more than 10% of individuals receiving hospice care had an infection when discharged from hospice care. The most common infections were urinary tract infection (3.0-5.2%), pneumonia (2.2-4.4%), and cellulitis (1.6-2.0%). Short length of care and recent inpatient stay in a healthcare facility were associated with infections in all three populations. Taking 10 or more medications and urinary catheter exposure were significant in two of these three long-term care populations. Infection prevalence in HHC, hospice, and NH populations is similar. Although these infections may be community acquired or acquired during earlier healthcare exposures, these findings fill an important gap in understanding the national infection burden and may help inform future research on infection epidemiology and prevention strategies in long-term care populations.


As part of the Affordable Care Act, primary care physicians providing services to patients insured through Medicaid in some states will receive higher payments in 2013 and 2014 than in the past. Payments for some services will increase to match Medicare rates. This change may lead to wider acceptance of new Medicaid patients among primary care providers. Using data from the 2011-12 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Electronic Medical Records Supplement, I summarize baseline rates of acceptance of new Medicaid patients among office-based physicians by specialty and practice type. I also report state-level acceptance rates for both primary care and other physicians. About 33 percent of primary care physicians (those in general and family medicine, internal medicine, or pediatrics) did not accept new Medicaid patients in 2011-12, ranging from a low of 8.9 percent in Minnesota to a high of 54.0 percent in New Jersey. Primary care physicians in New Jersey, California, Alabama, and Missouri were less likely than the national average to accept new Medicaid patients in 2011-12. The data presented here provide a baseline for comparison of new Medicaid acceptance rates in 2013-14. ©2013 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Lubitz J.D.,National Center for Health Statistics
Health Services Research | Year: 2010

Objective. To update research on Medicare payments in the last year of life. Data Sources. Continuous Medicare History Sample, containing annual summaries of claims data on a 5 percent sample from 1978 to 2006. Study Design. Analyses were based on elderly beneficiaries in fee for service. For each year, Medicare payments were assigned either to decedents (persons in their last year) or to survivors (all others). Results. The share of Medicare payments going to persons in their last year of life declined slightly from 28.3 percent in 1978 to 25.1 percent in 2006. After adjustment for age, sex, and death rates, there was no significant trend. Conclusions. Despite changes in the delivery of medical care over the last generation, the share of Medicare expenditures going to beneficiaries in their last year has not changed substantially. © Health Research and Educational Trust.


Decker S.L.,National Center for Health Statistics
Health Affairs | Year: 2012

When fully implemented, the Affordable Care Act will expand the number of people with health insurance. This raises questions about the capacity of the health care workforce to meet increased demand. I used data on office-based physicians from the 2011 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Electronic Medical Records Supplement to summarize the percentage of physicians currently accepting any new patients. Although 96 percent of physicians accepted new patients in 2011, rates varied by payment source: 31 percent of physicians were unwilling to accept any new Medicaid patients; 17 percent would not accept new Medicare patients; and 18 percent of physicians would not accept new privately insured patients. Physicians in smaller practices and those in metropolitan areas were less likely than others to accept new Medicaid patients. Higher state Medicaid-to-Medicare fee ratios were correlated with greater acceptance of new Medicaid patients. The findings serve as a useful baseline from which to measure the anticipated impact of Affordable Care Act provisions that could boost Medicaid payment rates to primary care physicians in some states while increasing the number of people with health care coverage. © 2012 Project HOPE- The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

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