National Center for Health Statistics

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CHICAGO, May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Care Statistics (DHCS), selected Allscripts (NASDAQ:MDRX) as part of a team to provide data technology and services for United States National Health Care Surveys. The team is led by prime contractor ICF, a leading provider of professional services and technology-based solutions to government and commercial clients. The contract is a Blanket Purchase Agreement, signed in late 2016, with a total period of performance of five years. Allscripts technology, such as dbMotion™ Solution, and services will be available to support the mission of DHCS, which is collecting, monitoring, analyzing and disseminating data on the use, access, quality, safety, disparity and cost of health care in the United States and on the healthcare organizations and professionals who deliver that care. DHCS conducts the National Health Care Surveys, a family of nationally representative surveys of healthcare providers in inpatient, outpatient, ambulatory and long-term care settings. Providers, policy makers and researchers use the data from the surveys to address important topics in healthcare, including the quality and disparities of care among populations, epidemiology of medical conditions, diffusion of technologies, effects of policies and practice guidelines, and changes in healthcare over time. A critical component of the Allscripts CareInMotion™ population health platform, dbMotion Solution and Clinical Analytics Gateway (CAG) are industry-leading solutions that enable aggregation and harmonization of clinical data from diverse technologies and EHRs collected from a multitude of healthcare providers and facilities, including physicians and hospital inpatient and outpatient departments. CAG serves as a conduit for aggregated, harmonized clinical information for enhanced population studies. "The CDC National Center for Health Statistics provides a critical service as the nation’s principal health statistics agency,” said Allscripts Chief Executive Officer Paul M. Black. "We are proud to partner with ICF to strengthen the overarching National Center for Health Statistics mission — to improve U.S. health through actionable information collected and analyzed from the National Health Care Surveys.” About Allscripts Allscripts (NASDAQ:MDRX) is a leader in healthcare information technology solutions that advance clinical, financial and operational results. Our innovative solutions connect people, places and data across an Open, Connected Community of Health™. Connectivity empowers caregivers to make better decisions and deliver better care for healthier populations. To learn more, visit www.allscripts.com, Twitter, YouTube and It Takes A Community: The Allscripts Blog. Allscripts, the Allscripts logo, and other Allscripts marks are trademarks of Allscripts Healthcare, LLC and/or its affiliates. All other products are trademarks of their respective holders, all rights reserved. Reference to these products is not intended to imply affiliation with or sponsorship of Allscripts Healthcare, LLC and/or its affiliates.


Among the more jarring statistics in the 2017 edition: A free recording of a webinar addressing highlights from the 2017 edition of Injury Facts® is available, and the entire book can be purchased at nsc.org/injuryfacts. Credentialed media may request a complimentary copy of the book by emailing media@nsc.org. About the National Safety Council Founded in 1913 and chartered by Congress, the National Safety Council, nsc.org, is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to eliminate preventable deaths at work, in homes and communities, and on the road through leadership, research, education and advocacy. NSC advances this mission by partnering with businesses, government agencies, elected officials and the public in areas where we can make the most impact – distracted driving, teen driving, workplace safety, prescription drug overdoses and Safe Communities. i According to NSC analysis of National Center for Health Statistics data To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/national-safety-council-releases-annual-compilation-of-the-leading-causes-of-preventable-death-300456570.html


CHICAGO, May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Care Statistics (DHCS), selected Allscripts (NASDAQ:MDRX) as part of a team to provide data technology and services for United States National Health Care Surveys. The team is led by prime contractor ICF, a leading provider of professional services and technology-based solutions to government and commercial clients. The contract is a Blanket Purchase Agreement, signed in late 2016, with a total period of performance of five years. Allscripts technology, such as dbMotion™ Solution, and services will be available to support the mission of DHCS, which is collecting, monitoring, analyzing and disseminating data on the use, access, quality, safety, disparity and cost of health care in the United States and on the healthcare organizations and professionals who deliver that care. DHCS conducts the National Health Care Surveys, a family of nationally representative surveys of healthcare providers in inpatient, outpatient, ambulatory and long-term care settings. Providers, policy makers and researchers use the data from the surveys to address important topics in healthcare, including the quality and disparities of care among populations, epidemiology of medical conditions, diffusion of technologies, effects of policies and practice guidelines, and changes in healthcare over time. A critical component of the Allscripts CareInMotion™ population health platform, dbMotion Solution and Clinical Analytics Gateway (CAG) are industry-leading solutions that enable aggregation and harmonization of clinical data from diverse technologies and EHRs collected from a multitude of healthcare providers and facilities, including physicians and hospital inpatient and outpatient departments. CAG serves as a conduit for aggregated, harmonized clinical information for enhanced population studies. "The CDC National Center for Health Statistics provides a critical service as the nation’s principal health statistics agency,” said Allscripts Chief Executive Officer Paul M. Black. "We are proud to partner with ICF to strengthen the overarching National Center for Health Statistics mission — to improve U.S. health through actionable information collected and analyzed from the National Health Care Surveys.” About Allscripts Allscripts (NASDAQ:MDRX) is a leader in healthcare information technology solutions that advance clinical, financial and operational results. Our innovative solutions connect people, places and data across an Open, Connected Community of Health™. Connectivity empowers caregivers to make better decisions and deliver better care for healthier populations. To learn more, visit www.allscripts.com, Twitter, YouTube and It Takes A Community: The Allscripts Blog. Allscripts, the Allscripts logo, and other Allscripts marks are trademarks of Allscripts Healthcare, LLC and/or its affiliates. All other products are trademarks of their respective holders, all rights reserved. Reference to these products is not intended to imply affiliation with or sponsorship of Allscripts Healthcare, LLC and/or its affiliates.


Martin J.A.,National Center for Health Statistics
MMWR. Surveillance summaries : Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Surveillance summaries / CDC | Year: 2011

Preterm infants (those born at <37 completed weeks of gestation) are less likely to survive to their first birthday than infants delivered at higher gestational ages, and those who do survive, especially those born at the earlier end of the preterm spectrum, are more likely to suffer long-term disabilities than infants born at term. During 1981--2006, the U.S. preterm birth rate increased >30%, from 9.4% to 12.8% of all live births. Although lower during 2007 and 2008, the U.S. preterm birth rate remains higher than any year during 1981--2002.


Ogden C.L.,National Center for Health Statistics
National health statistics reports | Year: 2011

The high prevalence of obesity (defined by body mass index) among children and adolescents in the United States and elsewhere has prompted increased attention to body fat in childhood and adolescence. This report provides smoothed estimates of major percentiles of percentage body fat for boys and girls aged 8-19 years in the United States. Percentage body fat was obtained from whole-body, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans conducted during the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A nonparametric double-kernel method was employed to smooth percentile curves for the DXA data. The pattern of body fat development differs between boys and girls aged 8-19 years. In most age groups, girls have a higher percentage of body fat than boys. Among boys, there is a drop in body fat percentage in early adolescence that is especially pronounced at the higher percentiles. Among girls this pattern is not seen; percentage body fat increases slightly with age. These results provide a smoothed reference distribution of percentage body fat for U.S. children and adolescents aged 8-19 years.


MacDorman M.F.,National Center for Health Statistics
National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System | Year: 2010

OBJECTIVES: This report examines trends and characteristics of out-of-hospital and home births in the United States. METHODS: Descriptive tabulations of data are presented and interpreted. RESULTS: In 2006, there were 38,568 out-of-hospital births in the United States, including 24,970 home births and 10,781 births occurring in a freestanding birthing center. After a gradual decline from 1990 to 2004, the percentage of out-of-hospital births increased by 3% from 0.87% in 2004 to 0.90% in 2005 and 2006. A similar pattern was found for home births. After a gradual decline from 1990 to 2004, the percentage of home births increased by 5% to 0.59% in 2005 and remained steady in 2006. Compared with the U.S. average, home birth rates were higher for non-Hispanic white women, married women, women aged 25 and over, and women with several previous children. Home births were less likely than hospital births to be preterm, low birthweight, or multiple deliveries. The percentage of home births was 74% higher in rural counties of less than 100,000 population than in counties with a population size of 100,000 or more. The percentage of home births also varied widely by state; in Vermont and Montana more than 2% of births in 2005-2006 were home births, compared with less than 0.2% in Louisiana and Nebraska. About 61% of home births were delivered by midwives. Among midwife-delivered home births, one-fourth (27%) were delivered by certified nurse midwives, and nearly three-fourths (73%) were delivered by other midwives. DISCUSSION: Women may choose home birth for a variety of reasons, including a desire for a low-intervention birth in a familiar environment surrounded by family and friends and cultural or religious concerns. Lack of transportation in rural areas and cost factors may also play a role.


Dwyer L.L.,National Center for Health Statistics
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society | Year: 2013

To estimate infection prevalence and explore associated risk factors in nursing home (NH) residents, individuals receiving home health care (HHC), and individuals receiving hospice care. Cross-sectional. Nationally representative samples of 1,174 U.S. NHs in the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) and 1,036 U.S. HHC and hospice agencies in the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS). A nationally representative sample of 12,270 NH residents, 4,394 individuals receiving HHC, and 4,410 individuals receiving hospice care. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes were used to identify the presence of infection, including community-acquired infection and those acquired during earlier healthcare exposures. Unweighted response rates were 78% for the 2004 NHHS and 67% for the 2007 NHHCS. Approximately 12% of NH residents and 12% of individuals receiving HHC had an infection at the time of the survey interview, and more than 10% of individuals receiving hospice care had an infection when discharged from hospice care. The most common infections were urinary tract infection (3.0-5.2%), pneumonia (2.2-4.4%), and cellulitis (1.6-2.0%). Short length of care and recent inpatient stay in a healthcare facility were associated with infections in all three populations. Taking 10 or more medications and urinary catheter exposure were significant in two of these three long-term care populations. Infection prevalence in HHC, hospice, and NH populations is similar. Although these infections may be community acquired or acquired during earlier healthcare exposures, these findings fill an important gap in understanding the national infection burden and may help inform future research on infection epidemiology and prevention strategies in long-term care populations.


As part of the Affordable Care Act, primary care physicians providing services to patients insured through Medicaid in some states will receive higher payments in 2013 and 2014 than in the past. Payments for some services will increase to match Medicare rates. This change may lead to wider acceptance of new Medicaid patients among primary care providers. Using data from the 2011-12 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Electronic Medical Records Supplement, I summarize baseline rates of acceptance of new Medicaid patients among office-based physicians by specialty and practice type. I also report state-level acceptance rates for both primary care and other physicians. About 33 percent of primary care physicians (those in general and family medicine, internal medicine, or pediatrics) did not accept new Medicaid patients in 2011-12, ranging from a low of 8.9 percent in Minnesota to a high of 54.0 percent in New Jersey. Primary care physicians in New Jersey, California, Alabama, and Missouri were less likely than the national average to accept new Medicaid patients in 2011-12. The data presented here provide a baseline for comparison of new Medicaid acceptance rates in 2013-14. ©2013 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.


Lubitz J.D.,National Center for Health Statistics
Health Services Research | Year: 2010

Objective. To update research on Medicare payments in the last year of life. Data Sources. Continuous Medicare History Sample, containing annual summaries of claims data on a 5 percent sample from 1978 to 2006. Study Design. Analyses were based on elderly beneficiaries in fee for service. For each year, Medicare payments were assigned either to decedents (persons in their last year) or to survivors (all others). Results. The share of Medicare payments going to persons in their last year of life declined slightly from 28.3 percent in 1978 to 25.1 percent in 2006. After adjustment for age, sex, and death rates, there was no significant trend. Conclusions. Despite changes in the delivery of medical care over the last generation, the share of Medicare expenditures going to beneficiaries in their last year has not changed substantially. © Health Research and Educational Trust.


Decker S.L.,National Center for Health Statistics
Health Affairs | Year: 2012

When fully implemented, the Affordable Care Act will expand the number of people with health insurance. This raises questions about the capacity of the health care workforce to meet increased demand. I used data on office-based physicians from the 2011 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Electronic Medical Records Supplement to summarize the percentage of physicians currently accepting any new patients. Although 96 percent of physicians accepted new patients in 2011, rates varied by payment source: 31 percent of physicians were unwilling to accept any new Medicaid patients; 17 percent would not accept new Medicare patients; and 18 percent of physicians would not accept new privately insured patients. Physicians in smaller practices and those in metropolitan areas were less likely than others to accept new Medicaid patients. Higher state Medicaid-to-Medicare fee ratios were correlated with greater acceptance of new Medicaid patients. The findings serve as a useful baseline from which to measure the anticipated impact of Affordable Care Act provisions that could boost Medicaid payment rates to primary care physicians in some states while increasing the number of people with health care coverage. © 2012 Project HOPE- The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

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