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Downes G.M.,Forest Quality Pty. Ltd | Downes G.M.,Cooperative Research Center forestry Ltd. | Downes G.M.,National Center for Future Forest Industries | Harwood C.,Cooperative Research Center forestry Ltd. | And 4 more authors.
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products | Year: 2014

NIR predictions of cellulose content and stiffness (modulus of elasticity, MOE) from spectra collected from the radial longitudinal surface of Eucalyptus globulus wood were found to be reliable indicators of zones of non-recoverable collapse associated with the presence of tension wood. Radial sections from 25 quarter-sawn boards cut from plantation-grown E. globulus trees in Spain were scanned to generate radial profiles of NIR-predicted wood properties at 2 mm increments. These boards manifested a range of non-recoverable collapse features, from no collapse to one or more severe collapse bands. Collapse bands occurred where NIR-predicted cellulose content and MOE exceeded threshold levels of 50 % and 25 GPa, respectively for more than four consecutive millimetres. A non-recoverable collapse indicator provided a clear predictor of non-recoverable collapse. A NRCI value ≥100 for a consecutive interval of at least 4 mm successfully predicted all ten NRC bands with shrinkage ≥10 % of board thickness. The potential applications of this tension wood detection method are discussed. © 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Australia. Source


Blackburn D.P.,University of Tasmania | Blackburn D.P.,National Center for Future Forest Industries | Hamilton M.G.,University of Tasmania | Hamilton M.G.,National Center for Future Forest Industries | And 5 more authors.
Annals of Forest Science | Year: 2013

Context: Stem straightness is an important trait for growers and processors of Eucalyptus globulus logs for solid-wood products. Aims: The aims of the study were to determine the extent of genetic variation in stem deviation from straightness in E. globulus and assess the utility of a six-point subjective scoring method as a selection criterion for stem straightness. Methods: Two E. globulus progeny trials, grown under solid-wood product regimes, were studied. At age 9 years (post-thinning), stem straightness was measured using both image analysis and a six-point subjective scale. Diameter at breast height (DBH; 1.3 m) was measured at both age 5 (pre-thinning) and age 9 years. Results: Significant additive genetic variation was observed. Strong, positive and significant additive genetic correlations were observed between the stem straightness assessment methods and between DBH at ages 5 and 9 years. Significant positive genetic correlations were shown between subjectively scored stem straightness and DBH at both ages 5 and 9 years. Conclusion: The six-point subjective scoring method is a cost-effective selection criterion for stem straightness in E. globulus. The image measurement technique may be applied where objective estimates of stem straightness are required, for training purposes and to verify subjective scores. © 2013 INRA and Springer-Verlag France. Source


Vega M.,University of Tasmania | Vega M.,National Center for Future Forest Industries | Hamilton M.G.,CSIRO | Blackburn D.P.,University of Tasmania | And 7 more authors.
Annals of Forest Science | Year: 2016

Key message: Log-end splitting is one of the single most important defects in veneer logs. We show that log-end splitting in the temperate plantation speciesEucalyptus nitensvaries across sites and within-tree log position and increases with time in storage. Context: Log-end splitting is one of the single most important defects in veneer logs because it can substantially reduce the recovery of veneer sheets. Eucalyptus nitens can develop log-end splits, but factors affecting log-end splitting in this species are not well understood. Aims: The present study aims to describe the effect of log storage and steaming on the development of log-end splitting in logs from different plantations and log positions within the tree. Methods: The study was conducted on upper and lower logs from each of 41 trees from three 20–22-year-old Tasmanian E. nitens plantations. Log-end splitting was assessed immediately after felling, after transport and storage in a log-yard, and just before peeling. A pre-peeling steam treatment was applied to half the logs. Results: Site had a significant effect on splitting, and upper logs split more than lower logs with storage. Splitting increased with tree diameter breast height (DBH), but this relationship varied with site. The most rapidly growing site had more splitting even after accounting for DBH. No significant effect of steaming was detected. Conclusion: Log-end splitting varied across sites and within-tree log position and increased with time in storage. © 2015, INRA and Springer-Verlag France. Source


Hamilton M.G.,University of Tasmania | Hamilton M.G.,National Center for Future Forest Industries | Blackburn D.P.,University of Tasmania | Blackburn D.P.,National Center for Future Forest Industries | And 9 more authors.
Annals of Forest Science | Year: 2015

Key message: High levels of percentage green veneer recovery can be obtained from temperate eucalypt plantations. Recovery traits are affected by site and log position in the stem. Of the post-felling log traits studied, out-of-roundness was the best predictor of green recovery. Context: Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus nitens are widely planted in temperate regions of the globe but few studies of rotary peeling have been documented. Aims: This study aims to examine differences among sites and log positions in post-felling log traits and green veneer recovery traits and determine the extent to which log traits explain variation in recovery traits. Methods: Log traits and green rotary-peeled veneer recovery traits from six temperate eucalypt plantations were studied. Selected plantations encompassed different age, site productivity, silvicultural and species classes in south-eastern Australia. Differences in log and recovery traits among sites and between lower and upper logs were examined, as was the extent to which log traits explained variation in recovery traits. Results: Differences among sites for percentage recovered green veneer were non-significant, despite significant differences for peelable billet volume, roundup loss, residual core diameter and all post-felling log traits: small end diameter, sweep, taper, out-of-roundness, end splitting and dynamic modulus of elasticity (MOEdyn). The lower log exhibited more sweep, taper and out-of-roundness but lower MOEdyn and less recovered green veneer. Out-of-roundness was the best predictor of recovery traits (R2 = 13–21 %, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Recovered green veneer was high across all sites and log positions (78 % overall). © 2014, INRA and Springer-Verlag France. Source

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