National Center for Disease Control and Public Health of Georgia

Anderson, Georgia, United States

National Center for Disease Control and Public Health of Georgia

Anderson, Georgia, United States
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Nasrullah M.,National Center for HIV AIDS | Sergeenko D.,Ministry of Labor Health and Social Affairs of Georgia | Gvinjilia L.,CDC Foundation | Gamkrelidze A.,National Center for Disease Control and Public Health of Georgia | And 9 more authors.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | Year: 2017

What is already known about this topic? An estimated 150,000 persons in the country of Georgia (5.4% of the adult population) are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). In April 2015, in collaboration with CDC and other partners, Georgia launched a program to eliminate HCV by 2020. An important strategy is the identification of HCV-infected persons and provision of curative antiviral therapy. What is added by this report? During April 28, 2015–December 31, 2016, a total of 27,595 HCV-infected persons started therapy, 19,778 (71.7%) of whom completed treatment. Among 6,366 (32.2%) who completed treatment and were tested for treatment response, 5,356 (84.1%) were cured of their HCV infection. The average number of persons who initiated treatment each month increased threefold from April 2015–May 2016, when treatment was limited to persons with severe liver disease, to June–December 2016, after expansion of the eligibility criteria to allow treatment of all HCV-infected persons. During the last 3 months of 2016, the number of persons entering the treatment program declined steadily, suggesting that identification and linkage to care of HCV infected persons in the country might be slowing. What are the implications for public health practice? The Georgia HCV Elimination Program has made substantial progress since its launch in April 2015; the country has demonstrated the ability to scale up HCV care and treatment services rapidly. Enhancing HCV testing and linkage to care and treatment services are critical to reaching the 2020 HCV elimination goal. Lessons learned from the Georgia elimination program can inform programs in other countries striving to eliminate HCV as a public health threat. © 2017, Department of Health and Human Services. All rights reserved.


Shengelia L.,Maastricht University | Shengelia L.,National Center for Disease Control and Public Health of Georgia | Pavlova M.,Maastricht University | Groot W.,Maastricht University
BMC Health Services Research | Year: 2017

Background: The improvement of maternal health has been one of the aims of the health financing reforms in Georgia. Public-private relationships are the most notable part of the reform. This study aimed to assess the strengths and weakness of the maternal care financing in Georgia in terms of adequacy and effects. Methods: A qualitative design was used to explore the opinions of key stakeholders about the adequacy of maternal care financing and financial protection of pregnant women in Georgia. Women who had used maternal care during the past 4 years along with health care providers, policy makers, and representatives of international partner organizations and national professional body were the respondents in this study. Six focus group discussions to collect data from women and 15 face-to-face in-depth interviews to collect data from the other stakeholders were conducted. Each focus group discussion consisted of 7-8 women. Two focus group discussions were carried out at each of the target settings (i.e. Tbilisi, Imereti and Adjara). Women were selected in each location through the hospital registry and snowballing method. Results: The evidence shows that there is a consensus among maternal care stakeholder groups on the influence of the healthcare financing reforms on maternal health. Specifically, the privatization of the maternal care services has had positive effects because it significantly improved the environment and technical capacity of the maternity houses. Also, in contrast to other former-Soviet republics, there are no informal payments anymore for maternal care in Georgia. However the privatization, which was done without strict regulation, negatively influenced the reform process and provided the possibility to private providers to manipulate the formal user fees in maternal care. Stakeholders also indicated that the UHC programs implemented at the last stage of the healthcare financing reform as well as other state maternal health programs protect women from catastrophic health care expenditure. Conclusion: The results suggest a consensus among stakeholders on the influence of the healthcare financing reform on maternal healthcare. The total privatization of the maternal care services has had positive effects because it significantly improved the environment and the technical capacity of the maternity house. However, the aim to improve maternal health and to reduce maternal mortality was not fully achieved. Financial protection of mothers should be further studied to identify vulnerable groups who should be targeted in future programs. © 2017 The Author(s).


PubMed | Karolinska Institutet, Regional Health Service Lazio Region, Libra Foundation, University of Plymouth and 210 more.
Type: | Journal: Clinical and translational allergy | Year: 2017

The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to develop guidelines with all stakeholders that could be used globally for all countries and populations. ARIA-disseminated and implemented in over 70 countries globally-is now focusing on the implementation of emerging technologies for individualized and predictive medicine. MASK [MACVIA (

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