National Cancer Research Center Hospital

Tokyo, Japan

National Cancer Research Center Hospital

Tokyo, Japan

Time filter

Source Type

Kikuchi S.,Tokyo Medical University | Kikuchi S.,University of Tsukuba | Iwai M.,Tokyo Medical University | Sakurai-Yageta M.,Tokyo Medical University | And 8 more authors.
Cancer Science | Year: 2012

CADM1, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecule, acts as a tumor suppressor in a variety of human cancers. CADM1 is also ectopically expressed in adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), conferring an invasive phenotype characteristic to ATL. Therefore, CADM1 plays dual roles in human oncogenesis. Here, we investigate the roles of CADM1 in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that 10 of 35 (29%) primary SCLC tumors express CADM1 protein. Western blotting and RT-PCR analyses reveal that CADM1 is significantly expressed in 11 of 14 SCLC cells growing in suspension cultures but in neither of 2 SCLC cells showing attached growth to plastic dishes, suggesting that CADM1 is involved in anchorage-independent growth in SCLC. In the present study, we demonstrate that SCLC expresses a unique splicing variant of CADM1 (variant 8/9) containing additional extracellular fragments corresponding to exon 9 in addition to variant 8, a common isoform in epithelia. Variant 8/9 of CADM1 is almost exclusively observed in SCLC and testis, although this variant protein localizes along the membrane and shows similar cell aggregation activity to variant 8. Interestingly, both variant 8/9 and variant 8 of CADM1 show enhanced tumorigenicity in nude mice when transfected into SBC5, a SCLC cell lacking CADM1. Inversely, suppression of CADM1 expression by shRNA reduced spheroid-like cell aggregation of NCI-H69, an SCLC cell expressing a high amount of CADM1. These findings suggest that CADM1 enhances the malignant features of SCLC, as is observed in ATL, and could provide a molecular marker specific to SCLC. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association.


Seo S.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Renaud C.,University of Montréal | Kuypers J.M.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Kuypers J.M.,University of Washington | And 25 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2015

Newer diagnostic methods may link more idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) cases to an infectious agent. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 69 hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients with IPS diagnosed between 1992 and 2006 were tested for 28 pathogens (3 bacteria and 25 viruses) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and for Aspergillus by galactomannan assay. Research BALs from 21 asymptomatic HCT patients served as controls. Among 69 HCT patients with IPS, 39 (56.5%) had a pathogen detected. The most frequent pathogens were human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) (N = 20 [29%]) followed by human rhinovirus (HRV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Aspergillus (N = 8 [12%] in each). HHV-6 and HRV were rarely detected in controls, whereas CMV and Aspergillus were occasionally detected with low pathogen load. Patients with pathogens had worse day-100 survival than those without (hazard ratio, 1.88; P = .03). Mortality in patients with only pathogens of "uncertain" significance in lung was similar to that in patients with pathogens of "established" significance. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing did not reveal additional significant pathogens. Our study demonstrated that approximately half of patients with IPS had pathogens detected in BAL, and pathogen detection was associated with increased mortality. Thus, an expanded infection detection panel can significantly increase the diagnostic precision for idiopathic pneumonia. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.


PubMed | University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Samsung, University of Montréal and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Blood | Year: 2015

Newer diagnostic methods may link more idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) cases to an infectious agent. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 69 hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients with IPS diagnosed between 1992 and 2006 were tested for 28 pathogens (3 bacteria and 25 viruses) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and for Aspergillus by galactomannan assay. Research BALs from 21 asymptomatic HCT patients served as controls. Among 69 HCT patients with IPS, 39 (56.5%) had a pathogen detected. The most frequent pathogens were human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) (N = 20 [29%]) followed by human rhinovirus (HRV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Aspergillus (N = 8 [12%] in each). HHV-6 and HRV were rarely detected in controls, whereas CMV and Aspergillus were occasionally detected with low pathogen load. Patients with pathogens had worse day-100 survival than those without (hazard ratio, 1.88; P = .03). Mortality in patients with only pathogens of uncertain significance in lung was similar to that in patients with pathogens of established significance. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing did not reveal additional significant pathogens. Our study demonstrated that approximately half of patients with IPS had pathogens detected in BAL, and pathogen detection was associated with increased mortality. Thus, an expanded infection detection panel can significantly increase the diagnostic precision for idiopathic pneumonia.


Ueno T.,National Cancer Research Center Hospital | Ota Y.,Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital
Japanese Journal of Anesthesiology | Year: 2012

Postoperative complications sometimes follow ablasive surgery. Anesthesiologists usually pay much attention to the oral cavity when they intubate. However, they are not fully aware of the importance of perioperative oral care. Perioperative oral care in cooperation with a dental team enables to reduces the risk of postoperative complications and allows the safe and smooth completion of the treatment procedure safely and smoothly. Recently, the comprehensive health care system started, and we had to keep the occurrence of postoperative complications as low as possible and seek the quick recovery from the postoperative stage. Oral care, therefore, is an essential care, and can help guarantee the high quality results with general anesthesia.


Kaida M.,National Cancer Research Center Hospital | Kaida M.,Kitasato University | Morita-Hoshi Y.,National Cancer Research Center Hospital | Soeda A.,National Cancer Research Center Hospital | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Immunotherapy | Year: 2011

An open-labeled, dose-escalation phase 1 trial of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) vaccine and gemcitabine (GEM) combination therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer or biliary tract cancer was performed. The primary end point was evaluation of toxicity, safety, and optimal immunologic dose of vaccine. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A 0201, HLA-A 0206, and/or HLA-A 2402-positive patients with inoperable advanced pancreatic or biliary tract cancer who had not previously been treated with GEM were eligible for this study. Six doses of GEM and 4 doses of WT1 peptide (1 or 3 mg) emulsified in Montanide adjuvant were administered over 2 months. Twenty-five patients (13 male and 12 female) were enrolled. Nine patients had inoperable advanced pancreatic cancer, 8 had gallbladder cancer, 4 had intrahepatic, and 4 had extrahepatic bile duct cancer. The adverse events were comparable to those with GEM alone. Delayed-type hypersensitivity test was positive after vaccination in 2 patients, and WT1-specific T cells in peptide-stimulated culture were detected by tetramer assay in 59% (13 of 22) of patients. The disease control rate at 2 months was 89% for pancreatic cancer and 50% for biliary tract cancer. With a median follow-up time of 259 days, the median survival time for biliary tract cancer was 288 days, and that for pancreatic cancer was 259 days. Although objective clinical efficacy was not apparent, the safety of WT1 vaccine and GEM combination therapy was confirmed in this study. © 2010 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


PubMed | National Cancer Research Center Hospital
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase I | Journal: Journal of immunotherapy (Hagerstown, Md. : 1997) | Year: 2010

An open-labeled, dose-escalation phase 1 trial of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) vaccine and gemcitabine (GEM) combination therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer or biliary tract cancer was performed. The primary end point was evaluation of toxicity, safety, and optimal immunologic dose of vaccine. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A 0201, HLA-A 0206, and/or HLA-A 2402-positive patients with inoperable advanced pancreatic or biliary tract cancer who had not previously been treated with GEM were eligible for this study. Six doses of GEM and 4 doses of WT1 peptide (1 or 3 mg) emulsified in Montanide adjuvant were administered over 2 months. Twenty-five patients (13 male and 12 female) were enrolled. Nine patients had inoperable advanced pancreatic cancer, 8 had gallbladder cancer, 4 had intrahepatic, and 4 had extrahepatic bile duct cancer. The adverse events were comparable to those with GEM alone. Delayed-type hypersensitivity test was positive after vaccination in 2 patients, and WT1-specific T cells in peptide-stimulated culture were detected by tetramer assay in 59% (13 of 22) of patients. The disease control rate at 2 months was 89% for pancreatic cancer and 50% for biliary tract cancer. With a median follow-up time of 259 days, the median survival time for biliary tract cancer was 288 days, and that for pancreatic cancer was 259 days. Although objective clinical efficacy was not apparent, the safety of WT1 vaccine and GEM combination therapy was confirmed in this study.


PubMed | National Cancer Research Center Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Masui. The Japanese journal of anesthesiology | Year: 2012

Postoperative complications sometimes follow ablasive surgery. Anesthesiologists usually pay much attention to the oral cavity when they intubate. However, they are not fully aware of the importance of perioperative oral care. Perioperative oral care in cooperation with a dental team enables to reduces the risk of postoperative complications and allows the safe and smooth completion of the treatment procedure safely and smoothly. Recently, the comprehensive health care system started, and we had to keep the occurrence of postoperative complications as low as possible and seek the quick recovery from the postoperative stage. Oral care, therefore, is an essential care, and can help guarantee the high quality results with general anesthesia.

Loading National Cancer Research Center Hospital collaborators
Loading National Cancer Research Center Hospital collaborators