National Cancer Information Center

Goyang, South Korea

National Cancer Information Center

Goyang, South Korea
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Jang S.Y.,Yonsei University | Kim J.-H.,Yonsei University | Kim J.-H.,Institute of Health Services Research | Lim M.-K.,National Cancer Information Center | And 7 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2012

Background: This study examined the influence of body mass index (BMI), subjective body perception (SBP), and the differences between BMI and SBP influence on smoking among women. Methods: This study used the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV-2, 3 2008-2009. A urinary cotinine test was administered to 5485 women at least 19 years of age. Individuals whose cotinine level was at least 50 ng/mL were categorized as smokers. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the extent to which body-related variables affect female smoking. Results: Women with a lower BMI who perceived themselves to be normal or very fat were 2.09 times (1.14-3.83) more likely to smoke than women with a normal BMI and SBP. Women who were never married with a low BMI and thin SBP were 3.11 times (1.47-6.55) more likely to smoke than women with a normal BMI and SBP. Married women with a high BMI who considered themselves very fat were 0.63 times (0.43-0.94) less likely to smoke than women with a normal BMI and SBP. In contrast, divorced and widowed women with a low or normal BMI who considered themselves very fat were 26.1 times (1.35-507.3) more likely to smoke. Conclusions: Discrepancies between the objective physical condition (BMI) and the subjective body image (SBP) influence the female smoking rate. To reduce the number of female smokers, public education on the association between smoking behavior and weight issues is needed, especially among women with low BMI and distorted weight perception.


Kye S.Y.,National Cancer Information Center | Noh H.-I.,National Cancer Information Center | Kwak M.-S.,Samsung | Kwak M.-S.,Seoul National University | Chang Y.J.,National Cancer Information Center
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2010

Objective: Seeking information about cancer is an important means by which individuals acquire cancerrelated knowledge and know whether they should be screened for cancer. This study was performed to identify the desired types of cancer screening information and to describe patterns of information-seeking behavior. Methods: In August 2006, a questionnaire was administered to a population of South Korean adults who ranged in age from 40 to 70 years (n = 1,676). The chi-square test, linear regression, and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Only 7.8% of the study population reported seeking information about cancer within the previous 12 months. Respondents were more likely to seek information about cancer if they were younger than 49 years, had a post-high school education, were insured through Medicaid, perceived their health status to be fair or poor/very poor and had received prior cancer screening. The most desired information included methods of cancer screening, followed by procedures, benefits and necessity, and limits and side effects. Factors associated with the need for information were age (i.e., less than 49 years), residence (i.e., non-metropolitan), perceived health status (i.e., fair or poor/very poor), cancer family history, and prior cancer screening. Conclusion: It is important to understand the characteristics of information seekers and non-seekers and to deliver cancer screening information based on individuals' needs to promote higher rates of cancer screening.


Shin A.,National Cancer Center | Park S.,National Cancer Center | Shin H.R.,National Cancer Center | Shin H.R.,International Data Group | And 10 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2011

Background: A number of infectious agents have been classified as human carcinogens. The purpose of the current study was to provide an evidence-based assessment of the burden of infection-related cancers in the Korean population. Materials and methods: The population attributable fraction was calculated using infection prevalence data from 1990 or earlier, relative risk estimates from meta-analyses using mainly Korean studies and national data on cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2007. Results: The fractions of all cancers attributable to infection were 25.1% and 16.8% for cancer incidence in men and women, and 25.8% and 22.7% of cancer mortality in men and women, respectively. Among infection-related cancers, Helicobacter pylori was responsible for 56.5% of cases and 45.1% of deaths, followed by hepatitis B virus (HBV) (23.9% of cases and 37.5% of deaths) and human papillomavirus (HPV) (11.3% of cases and 6% of deaths) and then by hepatitis C virus (HCV) (6% of cases and 9% of deaths). Over 97% of infection-related cancers were attributable to infection with H. pylori, HBV, HCV and HPV. Conclusion: Up to one-quarter of cancer cases and deaths would be preventable through appropriate control of infectious agents in Korea. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


Rabius V.,Anderson University, South Carolina | Wiatrek D.,National Cancer Information Center | McAlister A.L.,University of Texas at Austin
Nicotine and Tobacco Research | Year: 2012

Introduction: Quitlines that provide telephone counseling for smoking cessation have been proved to be effective. All 50 states currently provide free quitline access to their residents; however, little research has been published on African American utilization of quitlines or their success rates. Methods: This study evaluated how effectively African Americans are served by telephone counseling (quitline) for smoking cessation based on empirical data from 45,510 callers from Texas, Louisiana, Washington, and District of Columbia and randomized clinical trial data from 3,522 participants. Results: African Americans tended to use a quitline in proportions greater than their proportional representation in the smoking communities in both states and the District. African American quit rates were equivalent to those of non-Hispanic "Whites" as were their levels of satisfaction with the service and the number of counseling sessions they completed. African Americans were more likely to request counseling than non-Hispanic Whites. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that telephone counseling is a promising tool for addressing health disparities related to smoking among African Americans. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved.


Kye S.Y.,National Cancer Information Center | Park K.,National Cancer Information Center
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2012

Objective: This study was an attempt to identify associations between health behavior, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, healthy diet, and physical activity, and psychosocial factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,500 participants aged between 30 and 69 years, selected from a population-based database in October 2009 through multiple-stratified random sampling. Information was collected about the participants' smoking and drinking habits, dietary behavior, level of physical activity, stress, coping strategies, impulsiveness, personality, social support, sense of coherence, self-efficacy, health communication, and sociodemographics. Results: Agreeableness, as a personality trait, was negatively associated with smoking and a healthy diet, while extraversion was positively associated with drinking. The tendency to consume a healthy diet decreased in individuals with perceived higher stress, whereas it increased in individuals who had access to greater social support. Self-efficacy was found to be a strong predictor of all health behaviors. Provider-patient communication and physical environment were important factors in promoting positive healthy behavior, such as consumption of a healthy diet and taking regular exercise. Conclusions: Psychosocial factors influence individuals' smoking and drinking habits, dietary intake, and exercise patterns.


Kye S.Y.,National Cancer Information Center | Yun E.H.,National Cancer Information Center | Park K.,National Cancer Information Center
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2012

Objective: Improvements in diet can decrease the cancer rates. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationships between self-perception of diet quality and personality, impulsiveness, stress, coping strategy, sense of coherence, self-efficacy, and social support. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using a multiple-stratified random sampling method based on the Korea Census of 2007. In October 2009, investigators conducted 15-minute face-to-face interviews with 1,530 South Korean volunteers who ranged from 30 to 69 years of age without a history of cancer. Results: Respondents were more likely to perceive that they consumed a healthy diet if they were older than 50 years, lived with a partner, had a monthly family income greater than $4,000 USD, had a low perceived risk of cancer, consumed less alcohol, exercised regularly, had a less agreeable or conscientious personality, had low stress levels, had a high sense of coherence or self-efficacy, and had ample social support. Conclusion: Psychosocial factors, such as personality, stress, sense of coherence, self-efficacy, and social support, are associated with the self-perception of diet quality. Analysis of the factors that contribute to a perceived healthy diet could assist with the design of educational campaigns.


Kye S.Y.,National Cancer Information Center | Yun E.H.,National Cancer Information Center | Park K.,National Cancer Information Center
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2012

Objective: This paper aimed to determine the relationship between cancer information scanning and seeking experience of adolescents and cancer preventive behavior, perceived cancer risk, and levels of cancerrelated knowledge. Methods: The study sample comprised 1,000 second-year students from 6 high schools: The general and vocational school systems were each represented by 1 boys', 1 girls', and 1 coeducational high school. In July 2011, trained researchers visited each classroom, explained the purpose of the study, distributed questionnaires to the students who agreed to participate, instructed them to complete the survey by self-reporting, and collected the completed questionnaires. Results: The students who attended general high schools (as compared with vocational high schools), earned higher grades, consumed more vegetables, had a higher perceived cancer risk, and answered the cancer-related questions more correctly had more cancer information scanning and seeking experience. Conclusion: These results reinforce the importance of cancer prevention health education. Furthermore, the results may help in preparing a strategy that enables people to acquire accurate cancer-related information easily and quickly.


Kye S.Y.,National Cancer Information Center | Han E.O.,Daegu Health College | Park K.H.,National Cancer Information Center
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2010

Objectives: This study analyzed stages of adoption of gastric cancer screening and explored relationships with the processes of change, pros, cons, and self-efficacy in an effort to assess the barriers to and facilitators of regular gastric cancer screening. Methods: The study sample consisted of 650 participants who were at least 40 years old, had no history of cancer, and resided in two urban areas in Korea. Stages of adoption, processes of changes, pros and cons of screening, and self-efficacy were recorded from January 12 to February 16, 2009. Data were assessed by analysis of variance and logistic regression. Results: The stage of adoption was determined for 650 respondents, of whom 52 were in the precontemplation stage (8.0%), 209 in the contemplation stage (32.0%), 52 in the action stage (8.0%), and 337 in the maintenance stage (51.8%). Those who underwent regular gastric cancer screening were more committed, more willing to participate in the healthcare system, perceived fewer cons of screening, reported a greater self-efficacy, and perceived gastric cancer risk as moderate. Conclusions: Our findings should be helpful for the development of intervention strategies designed to improve recognition of the importance of cancer screening and encourage Koreans to undergo regular screening for gastric cancer.


PubMed | National Cancer Information Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP | Year: 2012

This study was an attempt to identify associations between health behavior, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, healthy diet, and physical activity, and psychosocial factors.This cross- sectional study was conducted among 1,500 participants aged between 30 and 69 years, selected from a population-based database in October 2009 through multiple-stratified random sampling. Information was collected about the participants smoking and drinking habits, dietary behavior, level of physical activity, stress, coping strategies, impulsiveness, personality, social support, sense of coherence, self-efficacy, health communication, and sociodemographics.Agreeableness, as a personality trait, was negatively associated with smoking and a healthy diet, while extraversion was positively associated with drinking. The tendency to consume a healthy diet decreased in individuals with perceived higher stress, whereas it increased in individuals who had access to greater social support. Self-efficacy was found to be a strong predictor of all health behaviors. Provider-patient communication and physical environment were important factors in promoting positive healthy behavior, such as consumption of a healthy diet and taking regular exercise.Psychosocial factors influence individuals smoking and drinking habits, dietary intake, and exercise patterns.


PubMed | National Cancer Information Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP | Year: 2011

This study analyzed stages of adoption of gastric cancer screening and explored relationships with the processes of change, pros, cons, and self-efficacy in an effort to assess the barriers to and facilitators of regular gastric cancer screening.The study sample consisted of 650 participants who were at least 40 years old, had no history of cancer, and resided in two urban areas in Korea. Stages of adoption, processes of changes, pros and cons of screening, and self-efficacy were recorded from January 12 to February 16, 2009. Data were assessed by analysis of variance and logistic regression.The stage of adoption was determined for 650 respondents, of whom 52 were in the precontemplation stage (8.0%), 209 in the contemplation stage (32.0%), 52 in the action stage (8.0%), and 337 in the maintenance stage (51.8%). Those who underwent regular gastric cancer screening were more committed, more willing to participate in the healthcare system, perceived fewer cons of screening, reported a greater self-efficacy, and perceived gastric cancer risk as moderate.Our findings should be helpful for the development of intervention strategies designed to improve recognition of the importance of cancer screening and encourage Koreans to undergo regular screening for gastric cancer.

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