National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa

Chiba, Japan

National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa

Chiba, Japan
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Ikeda H.,Okayama University of Science | Taira N.,Okayama University of Science | Hara F.,National Hospital Organization | Fujita T.,Okayama University of Science | And 8 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research | Year: 2010

Introduction: Microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) inhibits the function of taxanes and high expression of MAPT decreases the sensitivity to taxanes. The relationship between estrogen receptor (ER) and MAPT in breast cancer is unclear. In this study, we examined the correlation of MAPT expression with the sensitivity of human breast cancer cells to taxanes, and the relationship between ER and MAPT.Methods: The correlation between MAPT expression and sensitivity to taxanes was investigated in 12 human breast cancer cell lines. Alterations in cellular sensitivity to taxanes were evaluated after knockdown of MAPT expression. ER expression was knocked down or stimulated in MAPT- and ER-positive cell lines to examine the relationship between ER and MAPT. The cells were also treated with hormone drugs (tamoxifen and fulvestrant) and taxanes.Results: mRNA expression of MAPT did not correlate with sensitivity to taxanes. However, expression of MAPT protein isoforms of less than 70 kDa was correlated with a low sensitivity to taxanes. Downregulation of MAPT increased cellular sensitivity to taxanes. MAPT protein expression was increased by stimulation with 17-β-estradiol or tamoxifen, but decreased by ER downregulation and by fulvestrant, an ER inhibitor. The combination of fulvestrant with taxanes had a synergistic effect, whereas tamoxifen and taxanes had an antagonistic effect.Conclusions: Expression of MAPT protein isoforms of less than 70 kDa is correlated with a low sensitivity to taxanes in breast cancer cells. ER influences MAPT expression and fulvestrant increases the sensitivity to taxanes in MAPT- and ER-positive breast cancer cells. © 2010 Ikeda et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Tomioka T.,National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa | Hayashi R.,National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa | Ebihara M.,National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa | Miyazaki M.,National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa | And 2 more authors.
Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2013

Objective: This study was conducted to assess local recurrence and clinical prognosis in patients diagnosed as having a positive margin in the epithelial layer after a partial glossectomy treated by close observation. Methods: A total of 365 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue diagnosed as clinical Stage I or II, treated by partial glossectomy in the National Cancer Center Hospital East between 1992 and 2006, were studied retrospectively. Results: Pathological findings showed that 13 cases had positive margins in the epithelial layer, 4 (30.8%) of whom showed up with local recurrence in 4.4 years (3.0-5.0) on average. Lymph node recurrence was not observed and the 5-year overall survival rate was 76.2% in those 13 cases. The treatment for the recurrent cases was an additional partial glossectomy without neck dissection, which resulted in no recurrence and a survival rate of 100% after an average follow-up of 6.7 years. Conclusions: We suggest careful observation as one option for cases diagnosed with epithelial positive margin. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


PubMed | National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Japanese journal of clinical oncology | Year: 2013

This study was conducted to assess local recurrence and clinical prognosis in patients diagnosed as having a positive margin in the epithelial layer after a partial glossectomy treated by close observation.A total of 365 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue diagnosed as clinical Stage I or II, treated by partial glossectomy in the National Cancer Center Hospital East between 1992 and 2006, were studied retrospectively.Pathological findings showed that 13 cases had positive margins in the epithelial layer, 4 (30.8%) of whom showed up with local recurrence in 4.4 years (3.0-5.0) on average. Lymph node recurrence was not observed and the 5-year overall survival rate was 76.2% in those 13 cases. The treatment for the recurrent cases was an additional partial glossectomy without neck dissection, which resulted in no recurrence and a survival rate of 100% after an average follow-up of 6.7 years.We suggest careful observation as one option for cases diagnosed with epithelial positive margin.


PubMed | National Cancer Center Hospital East Kashiwa
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in oncology | Year: 2012

Primary tumors of the colorectal cancers are assessed pathologically based on the tumor spread into the bowel wall. The assessment of serosal involvement, which may be relevant to pT4, can be challenging for pathologists, making the consistency of diagnoses questionable. As solutions to this problem, the following two strategies could be adopted. One would be to use special staining or immunohistochemical staining techniques for diagnostic assistance. The other would be to construct recommendations for the assessment of tumor spreading and to obtain a world-wide consensus on the criteria used to assess tumor spreading. Using elastic staining, we previously reported that peritoneal elastic laminal invasion (ELI) could be objectively determined and would likely contribute to a simplified and more objective stratification of deep tumor invasion around the peritoneal surface. We also noted the importance of sampling, staining, and histo-anatomical knowledge in the application of elastic staining during routine pathological diagnosis. Here we review the history of primary tumor stratification leading to the present TNM classification and report on the current status of pathological assessments made at our hospital to summarize what has been established and what is further required for the pathological diagnosis of tumor spreading in patients with colorectal cancer.

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