ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources

Bangalore, India

ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources

Bangalore, India
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Malathi V.M.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Jalali S.K.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Mohan M.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Venkatesan T.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources
Insect Science | Year: 2017

The brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), is one of the major pests of rice throughout Asia. Extensive use of insecticides for suppressing N. lugens has resulted in the development of insecticide resistance leading to frequent control failures in the field. The aim of the present study was to evaluate resistance in the field populations of N. lugens from major rice growing states of South India to various insecticides. We also determined the activity of detoxifying enzymes (esterases [ESTs], glutathione S-transferases [GSTs], and mixed-function oxidases [MFOs]). Moderate levels of resistance were detected in the field populations to acephate, thiamethoxam and buprofezin (resistance factors 1.05–20.92 fold, 4.52–14.99 fold, and 1.00–18.09 fold, respectively) as compared with susceptible strain while there were low levels of resistance to imidacloprid (resistance factor 1.23–6.70 fold) and complete sensitivity to etofenoprox (resistance factor 1.05–1.66 fold). EST activities in the field populations were 1.06 to 3.09 times higher than the susceptible strain while for GST and MFO the ratios varied from 1.29 to 3.41 and 1.03 to 1.76, respectively. The EST activity was found to be correlated to acephate resistance (r = 0.999, P ≥ 0.001). The high selection pressure of organophosphate, neonicotinoid, and insect growth regulator (IGR) in the field is likely to be contributing for resistance in BPH to multiple insecticides, leading to control failures. The results obtained will be beneficial to IPM recommendations for the use of effective insecticides against BPH. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences


Gupta A.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Rajeshwari S.K.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Azevedo C.O.,Federal University of Espirito Santo
Zootaxa | Year: 2017

Megaprosternum Azevedo (Bethylidae: Scleroderminae) is newly recorded from the Oriental region, and M. cleonarovorum Gupta & Azevedo sp. nov. is described and illustrated from Southern India as a gregarious larval ectoparasitoid of Cleonaria bicolor Thomson (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on the host plant Ixora coccinea L. (Rubiacae). This is the first ever documentation of the biology of Megaprosternum Azevedo. © 2017 Magnolia Press.


David K.J.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Hancock D.L.,The-Edge
Zootaxa | Year: 2017

Gastrozona nigrifemur sp. nov., is described from India. Postabdominal structures of G. fasciventris (both male and female), G. soror (female) and G. Montana (male) are described and illustrated. An updated key to Indian species of Gastrozona is provided. © 2017 Magnolia Press.


Rameshkumar A.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Poorani J.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Anjana M.,Western Ghats Regional Center
Biodiversity Data Journal | Year: 2015

Dicopus longipes (Subba Rao) (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Mymaridae) is recorded from India for the first time. New additional distribution records of Mymaridae from the southern Indian states of Tamil Nadu and Kerala are documented. © Rameshkumar A et al.


Poorani J.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources
Biodiversity Data Journal | Year: 2015

The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. New information Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolus sororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species. © Poorani J.


Rameshkumar A.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Poorani J.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Naveen V.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources
Biodiversity Data Journal | Year: 2015

Background Encyrtidae and Mymaridae of India have not been surveyed in depth and hosts are not known for most of the species as the methods of collections used are passive and do not yield firsthand information on the hosts. Based on our ongoing surveys on the Encyrtidae and Mymaridae of India, we report here new distribution and host records for some species. New information Acmopolynema campylurum Xu and Lin, Litus cynipseus Haliday, Omyomymar glabrum Lin and Chiappini and Platystethynium Ogloblin (Mymaridae), and Rhytidothorax purpureiscutellum (Girault) (Encyrtidae) are reported for the first time from India. Anagyrus aquilonaris (Noyes and Hayat) is recorded as new to Arunachal Pradesh and Meghalaya. Paraphaenodiscus indicus Singh and Agarwal and Paraphaenodiscus monawari Bhuiya are recorded from south India for the first time, the latter on a new host, Pulvinaria polygonata. Chorizococcus sorghi Williams (Pseudococcidae) is reported as a host for Cryptanusia ajmerensis (Fatma & Shafee), for which no hosts are hitherto known and the male of Cryptanusia is documented for the first time. Aclerda sp. is recorded as a new host for Neastymachus axillaris Singh, Agarwal and Basha. © Rameshkumar A et al.


Debnath S.,Tocklai Tea Research Institute | Sreerama Kumar P.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources
Egyptian Journal of Biological Pest Control | Year: 2017

In an investigation to identity fungal pathogens of the red spider mite (RSM), Oligonychus coffeae Nietner (Acari: Tetranychidae), a serious concern to tea cultivation in 4 traditional tea-producing regions in north-eastern India, 9 ascomycetous fungi were found to have caused mortality of the pest. A total of 746 mites were found with external mycelium produced by at least 1 of the 9 fungal genera, registering an incidence of 3.7% in the surveyed areas. Over all the regions, Fusarium moniliforme showed the highest incidence (2.51%), followed by Acremonium strictum (0.64%), Hirsutella thompsonii (0.51%), Trichothecium roseum (0.50%), Cladosporium sp. (0.33%), Cephalosporium sp. (0.21%), Paecilomyces lilacinus (0.09%), Aspergillus ochraceus (0.07%) and Penicillium sp. (0.05%). Valuably, the well-known acaropathogenic fungus H. thompsonii was prevalent in all the areas surveyed with an incidence range of 0.10-1.03%. This study assumes special significance as it reports the prevalence of the mycoacaricide candidate H. thompsonii in the tea ecosystem across north-eastern India as well as authenticates T. roseum as a pathogen of O. coffeae for the first time. Since tea from this region is consumed the world over, developing a new biocontrol strategy for RSM is a priority to reduce chemical application. © 2017, Egyptian Society for Biological Control of Pests. All rights reserved.


Gupta A.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Gawas S.M.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources
Systematic Parasitology | Year: 2016

In rearing of Gangara thyrsis (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) from Karnataka and Goa, India, six species of parasitoids were observed. One new species of parasitic wasp is described and illustrated: Agiommatus thyrsisae n. sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a solitary parasitoid reared from the egg of G. thyrsis on the natural host plant Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf. Three additional species of parasitic wasps were also reared: Anastatus ramakrishnai (Mani, 1935) (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae), a solitary hyperparasitoid of A. thyrsisae n. sp.; Sympiesis thyrsisae Gupta, Gawas & Bhambure (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious parasitoid reared from the caterpillar of G. thyrsis on the host plant Cocos nucifera L., and Brachymeria lasus (Walker) reared from pupa of G. thyrsis on the host plant D. lutescens. Additionally, two species of tachinid flies were also reared from the pupae of G. thyrsis: Exorista sorbillans (Wiedemann, 1830) and an innominate species close to Blepharella spp. Gangara thyrsis is a new host record for the genus Agiommatus and for A. ramakrishnai and B. lasus. The mean percent parasitism in G. thyrsis eggs was 26.58% with an incubation period of 6−7 days. Amongst the egg parasitoids, 57.14–73.08% were females and 23.08% were males. Hyperparasitism ranged from 3.85 to 42.86%. Dypsis lutescens, a member of Arecaceae, is a new host plant record for G. thyrsis. © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Gupta A.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Venkatesan T.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | More R.P.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Glyptapanteles Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae) is a cosmopolitan group of hyperdiverse parasitic wasps. The genus remains taxonomically challenging in India due to its highly speciose nature, morphological similarity amongst species and negligible host records. The Indian fauna is one of the most diverse and also the least studied. The present study is based on 60 populations reared from 35 host species, 100+ individual caterpillar rearings (1100 wasp specimens pinned and 2000 in alcohol) and from 12 different geographical locations of the country (11 states and one Union territory) that represent 26 provisional Glyptapanteles species within 8 species-groups. Out of 60 populations, phylogenetic analyses were performed on 38 based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) nucleotide sequences. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods displayed three and four major discrete Glyptapanteles clades, respectively. In clade A very few Indian species were grouped along with Neotropical and Thailand species. The other clades B and C grouped the majority of the Indian species and showed considerable host specificity in both the trees. All parasitic wasp species were gregarious in nature, except for two populations. Three different sets of data (morphology, host records, and COI) were integrated in order to generate accurate boundaries between species/species-groups. Illustrations of all parasitized caterpillars/cocoons and 42 habitus views of Glyptapanteles spp., distributional information, and GenBank accession numbers, are presented. The present study, perhaps the most comprehensive done to date in India, suggests the presence of several additional Glyptapanteles species, which were previously unrecognized. © 2016 Gupta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Kamalanathan V.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources | Mohanraj P.,ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources
Zootaxa | Year: 2016

Pardoteleia, a monotypic genus was described by Kozlov and Lê (1988). A new species Pardoteleia flava from India is now described and imaged. The hitherto unknown male of this genus is also described and imaged for the first time. Par-doteleia prater, the type species is redescribed and imaged with intraspecific variations in the Indian specimens. © 2016 Magnolia Press.

Loading ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources collaborators
Loading ICAR National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources collaborators