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de Munnik S.A.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Otten B.J.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Schoots J.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Bicknell L.S.,Western Research Institute | And 34 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2012

Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primordial dwarfism, microtia, and patellar aplasia/hypoplasia. Recently, mutations in the ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6 genes, encoding components of the pre-replication complex, have been identified. This complex is essential for DNA replication and therefore mutations are expected to impair cell proliferation and consequently could globally reduce growth. However, detailed growth characteristics of MGS patients have not been reported, and so this is addressed here through study of 45 MGS patients, the largest cohort worldwide. Here, we report that growth velocity (length) is impaired in MGS during pregnancy and first year of life, but, thereafter, height increases in paralleled normal reference centiles, resulting in a mean adult height of -4.5 standard deviations (SD). Height is dependent on ethnic background and underlying molecular cause, with ORC1 and ORC4 mutations causing more severe short stature and microcephaly. Growth hormone therapy (n=9) was generally ineffective, though in two patients with significantly reduced IGF1 levels, growth was substantially improved by GH treatment, with 2SD and 3.8 SD improvement in height. Growth parameters for monitoring growth in future MGS patients are provided and as well we highlight that growth is disproportionately affected in certain structures, with growth related minor genital abnormalities (42%) and mammary hypoplasia (100%) frequently present, in addition to established effects on ears and patellar growth. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.. Source


De Munnik S.A.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Bicknell L.S.,Western Research Institute | Aftimos S.,Northern Regional Genetics Service | Al-Aama J.Y.,King Abdulaziz University | And 30 more authors.
European Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2012

Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microtia, patellar aplasia/hypoplasia, and short stature. Recently, mutations in five genes from the pre-replication complex (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6), crucial in cell-cycle progression and growth, were identified in individuals with MGS. Here, we report on genotype-phenotype studies in 45 individuals with MGS (27 females, 18 males; age 3 months-47 years). Thirty-five individuals had biallelic mutations in one of the five causative pre-replication genes. No homozygous or compound heterozygous null mutations were detected. In 10 individuals, no definitive molecular diagnosis was made. The triad of microtia, absent/hypoplastic patellae, and short stature was observed in 82% of individuals with MGS. Additional frequent clinical features were mammary hypoplasia (100%) and abnormal genitalia (42%; predominantly cryptorchidism and hypoplastic labia minora/majora). One individual with ORC1 mutations only had short stature, emphasizing the highly variable clinical spectrum of MGS. Individuals with ORC1 mutations had significantly shorter stature and smaller head circumferences than individuals from other gene categories. Furthermore, compared with homozygous missense mutations, compound heterozygous mutations appeared to have a more severe effect on phenotype, causing more severe growth retardation in ORC4 and more frequently pulmonary emphysema in CDT1. A lethal phenotype was seen in four individuals with compound heterozygous ORC1 and CDT1 mutations. No other clear genotype-phenotype association was observed. Growth hormone and estrogen treatment may be of some benefit, respectively, to growth retardation and breast hypoplasia, though further studies in this patient group are needed. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved. Source


Bruno D.L.,VCGS | Bruno D.L.,University of Melbourne | Anderlid B.-M.,Karolinska Institutet | Lindstrand A.,Karolinska Institutet | And 28 more authors.
Journal of Medical Genetics | Year: 2010

Background: Chromosome 17p13.3 contains extensive repetitive sequences and is a recognised region of genomic instability. Haploinsufficiency of PAFAH1B1 (encoding LIS1) causes either isolated lissencephaly sequence or MillereDieker syndrome, depending on the size of the deletion. More recently, both microdeletions and microduplications mapping to the MillereDieker syndrome telomeric critical region have been identified and associated with distinct but overlapping phenotypes. Methods: Genome-wide microarray screening was performed on 7678 patients referred with unexplained learning difficulties and/or autism, with or without other congenital abnormalities. Eight and five unrelated individuals, respectively, were identified with microdeletions and microduplications in 17p13.3. Results: Comparisons with six previously reported microdeletion cases identified a 258 kb critical region, encompassing six genes including CRK (encoding Crk) and YWHAE (encoding 14-3-3ε). Clinical features included growth retardation, facial dysmorphism and developmental delay. Notably, one individual with only subtle facial features and an interstitial deletion involving CRK but not YWHAE suggested that a genomic region spanning 109 kb, encompassing two genes (TUSC5 and YWHAE), is responsible for the main facial dysmorphism phenotype. Only the microduplication phenotype included autism. The microduplication minimal region of overlap for the new and previously reported cases spans 72 kb encompassing a single gene, YWHAE. These genomic rearrangements were not associated with low-copy repeats and are probably due to diverse molecular mechanisms. Conclusions: The authors further characterise the 17p13.3 microdeletion and microduplication phenotypic spectrum and describe a smaller critical genomic region allowing identification of candidate genes for the distinctive facial dysmorphism (microdeletions) and autism (microduplications) manifestations. Source


Bicknell L.S.,Medical Research Council MRC | Bongers E.M.H.F.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Leitch A.,Medical Research Council MRC | Brown S.,Medical Research Council MRC | And 23 more authors.
Nature Genetics | Year: 2011

Meier-Gorlin syndrome (ear, patella and short-stature syndrome) is an autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism syndrome characterized by absent or hypoplastic patellae and markedly small ears. Both pre- and post-natal growth are impaired in this disorder, and although microcephaly is often evident, intellect is usually normal in this syndrome. We report here that individuals with this disorder show marked locus heterogeneity, and we identify mutations in five separate genes: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1 and CDC6. All of these genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, implicating defects in replication licensing as the cause of a genetic syndrome with distinct developmental abnormalities. © 2011 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. Source

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