National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region

Nishinoomote, Japan

National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region

Nishinoomote, Japan

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Takata K.,National Agriculture Research Center for Western Region | Ikeda T.M.,National Agriculture Research Center for Western Region | Yanaka M.,National Agriculture Research Center for Western Region | Matsunaka H.,Japan National Agriculture and Food Research Organization | And 4 more authors.
Breeding Science | Year: 2010

Grain texture is one of the most important characteristics that affect the end-use quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Mutations in the puroindoline-a and puroindoline-b genes are associated with hard grain texture. The expression patterns of the PINA and PINB proteins differ among Pin alleles. We studied the effect of Pin alleles on grain hardness, and milling flour properties using near isogenic lines grown at two different locations. The genotype was found to significantly affect quality parameters related to grain hardness. Grain hardness, flour particle size, damaged starch content were significantly low in Pinb-D1b as compared to Pinb-D1c, Pinb-D1p, Pina-D1b, and Pina-D1k. Grain hardness of Pina-D1k, lacking both PINA and PINB, were the highest, followed by Pina-D1b lacking PINA. Pina-D1k and Pina-D1b showed high damaged starch contents and CO 2 production. Damaged starch is associated with water absorption of flour and CO 2 production during dough fermentation, an important characteristic in bread-making. The alleles might be useful for improving bread-making quality. These results indicate that the grain texture of hard wheat is affected by the amount of PINs each allele.


Hamada A.,Kyoto University | Nitta M.,Kyoto University | Nasuda S.,Kyoto University | Kato K.,Okayama University | And 4 more authors.
Plant and Soil | Year: 2012

Aims: Because plants cannot change their environmental circumstances by changing their location, they must instead adapt to a wide variety of environmental conditions, especially soil conditions. One of the most effective ways for a plant to adapt to a given soil condition is by modifying its root system architecture. We aim to identify the genetic factors controlling root growth angle, a trait that affects root system architecture. Methods: The present study consisted of a genetic analysis of the seminal root growth angle in wheat; the parental varieties of the doubled haploid lines (DHLs) used in this study exhibited significantly different root growth directions. Using the 'basket' method, the ratio of deep roots (DRR; the proportion of total roots with GA > 45 degrees) was observed for evaluating deep rooting. Results: We were able to identify novel quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling the gravitropic and hydrotropic responses of wheat roots. Moreover, we detected one QTL for seminal root number per seedling (RN) on chromosome 5A and two QTLs for seminal root elongation rate (ER) on chromosomes 5D and 7D. Conclusions: Gravitropic and hydrotropic responses of wheat roots, which play a significant role in establishing root system architecture, are controlled by independent genetic factors. © 2011 The Author(s).


Okuda S.,Kagoshima University | Okuda M.,Chiyoda Corporation | Sugiyama M.,National Institute of Vegetable and Tea Science | Sakata Y.,National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region | And 2 more authors.
European Journal of Plant Pathology | Year: 2013

Fifty-one melon (Cucumis melo) accessions that originated from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh were evaluated for resistance to Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus (CCYV), a newly emerged species in the genus Crinivirus. CCYV was inoculated using sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) biotype Q. Accessions, JP 138332, JP 216154, JP 216155, JP 216751 and JP 91204, showed no or faint symptoms, although CCYV was detected from the non-inoculated upper leaves by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The five accessions were subjected to quantitative RT-PCR to analyze relative accumulation of CCYV RNA. All accessions except JP 138332 had levels of CCYV RNA accumulation comparable to the commercial variety, 'Earl's Seine', which was used as a control. JP 138332 showed a much lower CCYV RNA accumulation. Numbers of B. tabaci biotype Q on JP 138332 did not differ from 'Earl's Seine', in antixenosis tests, and the result suggested the resistance to CCYV was not due to antixenosis. Consequently, five accessions are of interest for development of resistant varieties. In particular, JP 138332 possesses a promising resistant trait for CCYV, which might be associated with inhibition of virus multiplication. © 2012 KNPV.


Sakaigaichi T.,National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region | Terajima Y.,National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region | Matsuoka M.,National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region | Terauchi T.,National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region | And 4 more authors.
Japanese Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2010

The growth and yield in the twice harvesting system (THS) were compared with those in once harvesting system (OHS) of two sugarcane varieties (KRFo93-1 bred for forage use and the leading commercial NiF8 for sugar production). The cumulative effective temperature was the highest in OHS, followed by the 1st crop in THS and the 2nd crop in THS in this order. The growth stage was younger as the cumulative effective temperature was lower in both varieties. The stem length was consistently longer in KRFo93-1 than in NiF8, and the differences in stem length between the two varieties was markedly significant in the initial growth period after ratooning and in the 2nd crops in THS including low temperature period. Fresh- and dry-matter yields averaged in the 1st and 2nd ratoon years in KRFo93-1 were 226 t/ha/yr and 56.1 t/ha/yr in OHS, respectively and 278 t/ha/yr and 57.7 t/ha/yr in THS. Dry matter productivity was higher in THS than in OHS in KRFo93-1 but was lower in THS than in OHS in NiF8. The mechanism of high yielding ability of KRFo93-1 in THS may be caused by the vigorous initial growth after ratooning and vigorous stem elongation in the low temperature period.


Sakaigaichi T.,National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region | Terajima Y.,National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region | Terauchi T.,National Agriculture Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region | Sugimoto A.,JIRCAS | And 2 more authors.
Japanese Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2010

The effect of dense planting in planting and ratooning cane of forage sugarcane variety, KRFo93-1, on the growth and yield was studied at farmers' fields in Nishinoomote, Kagoshima from 2007 to 2008. The planting density examined was 63.6 ×103 (control), 95.4×103 (1.5 times, dense planting) and 127.2×103 (2 times, dense planting) buds/ha. The number of stems increased with increasing planting density. The number of stems was the maximum at 63 days after planting (DAP) in 2007 and at 75 DAP in 2008 and it decreased thereafter. It was higher in 2007 than in 2008, which might be affected by the difference in the amount of solar radiation. Stem length was significantly longer in dense planting until 88 DAP in 2007 and until 102 DAP in 2008. The longer stem length may be due to the smaller tiller number per stool in dense planting. The vegetation cover ratio was significantly higher in dense planting. The average fresh-and dry-matter yields in 2007 and 2008 were higher in dense planting. The effect of dense planting was very large until 88 DAP in 2007 and until 102 DAP in 2008. Therefore, the yield-increasing effect of dense planting would be larger if the timing of harvest was earlier than in this study. Dense planting had a positive effect on the growth and yield of ratooning cane in dense planting.

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