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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DALLAS - May 8, 2017 - UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers found in a recent phase one clinical trial that stereotactic partial breast radiation was as safe as traditional radiation but decreased treatment time from six weeks to just days. UT Southwestern's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center is the only site in Texas and one of a few in the world to offer stereotactic partial breast radiation treatment to early-stage breast cancer patients. "Standard breast cancer treatments are delivered daily to the entire breast area over three to six weeks. We sought to deliver partial breast radiation in a noninvasive way, using precise image-guided stereotactic radiation," said Dr. Asal Rahimi, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology and first author of the study. "Our trial decreased treatment time to just five treatments delivered every other day." Seventy-five patients were studied from 2010-2016, in whom stereotactic partial breast radiation demonstrated both outstanding tumor control and excellent cosmetic results. Patients in the trial had been recently diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. The study is published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics and was funded by a grant from Accuray, producers of the Cyberknife used to deliver stereotactic partial breast radiation. One of the trial participants is Dr. Rahimi's patient Leslie LeBlanc, a dental hygienist and resident of Arlington, Texas. Mrs. LeBlanc was diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer four years ago at age 47. Her daughter had just started college and her son was in high school. "The same day that I got the diagnosis was mother's weekend for my daughter at college. I drove straight to Austin and told her the news," said Mrs. LeBlanc, who recalled the shock of being diagnosed. "It's like you're in the eye of a hurricane. Everything is buzzing around you, but you can't do anything but what they ask you to do, or tell you is the best option." While no genetic link has been established, her two sisters had previously been diagnosed with breast cancer, so the family had some experience with the disease. Mrs. LeBlanc was already in a risk assessment program at UT Southwestern and had mammograms and MRIs every six months, which helped catch her disease early. "It was overwhelming to consider doing several weeks of daily radiation while trying to work fulltime, be with my family, and do everything that I needed to do. This treatment option was so much better. I only missed a few days from work," said Mrs. LeBlanc, who is looking forward to reaching her 5-year mark as a survivor next year. "Mrs. LeBlanc is a working woman, a mom, and a wife. She's a great example of many women that will be impacted by this disease," said Dr. Rahimi. "We wanted to make this treatment more convenient for patients, because cancer is never convenient." The researchers plan continued studies of the partial breast radiation technique. "As technology improves, we will detect more early-stage breast cancers." said Dr. Robert Timmerman, Professor of Radiation Oncology and senior author on the study. "Patients with these early cancers might particularly benefit from a local therapy approach that both minimizes the normal tissue exposure while improving the convenience for patients who already lead hectic lives." According to the National Cancer Institute, 252,710 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year. When breast cancer is found early before it has spread, the patient has an improved chance of surviving five years after being diagnosed. For breast cancer I females, 61.8 percent are diagnosed at the local stage. The 5-year survival for localized breast cancer in women is 98.9 percent. Stereotactic partial breast radiation is delivered with the latest generation CyberKnife, one of several technologies in UT Southwestern's newly opened $66 million, 63,000-square-foot Radiation Oncology facility. The new facility houses a comprehensive mix of UT Southwestern's best cancer treatment technologies and medical expertise under one roof, and has dedicated areas for each major disease site such as brain, breast, and gastrointestinal cancer. Additional UT Southwestern researchers involved in the study include: Dr. Ann Spangler, Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology; Dr. Roshni Rao, Associate Professor of Surgery; Dr. Marilyn Leitch, Professor of Surgery; Dr. Rachel Wooldridge, Assistant Professor of Surgery; Dr. Aeisha Rivers, Assistant Professor of Surgery; Dr. Stephen Seiler, Assistant Professor of Radiology; Dr. Kevin Albuquerque, Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology; Dr. Sally Goudreau, Professor of Radiology; Dr. Barbara Haley, Professor of Internal Medicine; Dr. David Euhus, (former faculty); Dr. Chuxiong Ding, Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology; and Dr. Chul Ahn, Professor of Clinical Sciences. Dr. Timmerman holds the Effie Marie Cain Distinguished Chair in Cancer Therapy Research. Dr. Leitch holds the S.T. Harris Family Distinguished Chair in Breast Surgery, in Honor of A. Marilyn Leitch, M.D. Dr. Haley holds the Charles Cameron Sprague, M.D., Chair in Clinical Oncology. The Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center is the only NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in North Texas and one of just 47 NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the nation. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center includes 13 major cancer care programs. In addition, the Center's education and training programs support and develop the next generation of cancer researchers and clinicians. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center is among only 30 U.S. cancer research centers to be designated by the NCI as a National Clinical Trials Network Lead Academic Participating Site. UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty has received six Nobel Prizes, and includes 22 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators. The faculty of more than 2,700 is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in about 80 specialties to more than 100,000 hospitalized patients, 600,000 emergency room cases, and oversee approximately 2.2 million outpatient visits a year.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DALLAS - May 9, 2017 - UT Southwestern research investigating the blood glucose-regulatory actions of the hormone ghrelin may have implications for development of new treatments for diabetes. Blood glucose is tightly regulated by the opposing actions of the hormones insulin and glucagon. Earlier studies led by Dr. Roger Unger, Professor of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center, demonstrated that experimentally deleting or neutralizing receptors for glucagon can prevent or correct dangerously high blood glucose levels in different models of diabetes. "Dr. Unger's research suggested that high or unopposed glucagon action that results from insulin deficiency is the main culprit in the development of high blood glucose - known as hyperglycemia - in diabetes," said Dr. Jeffrey Zigman, Professor of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study, published online today in the journal Diabetes. "He proposed that blocking or neutralizing glucagon action may serve as a new treatment for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. This idea formed the basis of our current study," Dr. Zigman added. Like glucagon and insulin, ghrelin also plays an important role in blood glucose control. But because the hormone was only discovered in the 1990s, ghrelin's actions on blood glucose haven't been studied as much as those of glucagon and insulin. The UTSW research team wanted to learn more about the role of ghrelin in diabetes. "We studied mice that lacks glucagon receptors. When we tried to make these animals diabetic by giving them an agent that destroys insulin-producing cells, the mice did not develop diabetes. Their blood sugar was normal. In addition to these results, we found that their ghrelin levels were high," said Dr. Zigman, who holds the Kent and Jodi Foster Distinguished Chair in Endocrinology, in Honor of Daniel Foster, M.D., the Mr. and Mrs. Bruce G. Brookshire Professorship in Medicine, and The Diana and Richard C. Strauss Professorship in Biomedical Research. In a related set of studies, when the researchers blocked the action of the elevated ghrelin, doing so caused the animals' blood sugar levels to drop below normal, he added. "These findings suggest that when glucagon activity is blocked, circulating levels of ghrelin rise, which helps to prevent dangerously low blood sugars from developing, a condition known as hypoglycemia," Dr. Zigman said. Pharmaceutical companies are now developing drugs targeting glucagon receptors to treat diabetes, including antibodies that will neutralize glucagon receptors or drugs that will block glucagon receptors, he added. "The body's normal ghrelin response should protect diabetic individuals being treated with agents that target glucagon receptors from experiencing hypoglycemia," Dr. Zigman said. Since the current study focused on a Type 1 diabetes model, researchers next plan to examine the coordinated actions of the ghrelin and glucagon systems in a Type 2 diabetes model. They also want to study the impact of ghrelin on hypoglycemia. "A potential side effect with any treatment that lowers blood sugar is that hypoglycemia may develop," Dr. Zigman said. "We would like to determine whether the administration of ghrelin or a compound that mimics the action of ghrelin could help correct that hypoglycemia." Lead author of the study is Dr. Bharath Mani, Instructor of Internal Medicine, and the co-senior authors include Dr. Unger, who holds the Touchstone/West Distinguished Chair in Diabetes Research, and Dr. Eric Berglund, Assistant Professor in the Advanced Imaging Research Center and of Pharmacology. Other contributing UTSW researchers are Dr. Aki Uchida, postdoctoral research fellow; Dr. Young Lee, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine; and Sherri Osborne-Lawrence, senior research scientist. The study received support from the National Institutes of Health, the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, and the Hilda & Preston Davis Foundation. UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty has received six Nobel Prizes, and includes 22 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators. The faculty of more than 2,700 is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in about 80 specialties to more than 100,000 hospitalized patients, 600,000 emergency room cases, and oversee approximately 2.2 million outpatient visits a year. This news release is available on our website at http://www. . To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via email, subscribe at http://www. .


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

May 5, 2017 - UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified the cells that directly give rise to hair as well as the mechanism that causes hair to turn gray - findings that could one day help identify possible treatments for balding and hair graying. "Although this project was started in an effort to understand how certain kinds of tumors form, we ended up learning why hair turns gray and discovering the identity of the cell that directly gives rise to hair," said Dr. Lu Le, Associate Professor of Dermatology with the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center at UT Southwestern. "With this knowledge, we hope in the future to create a topical compound or to safely deliver the necessary gene to hair follicles to correct these cosmetic problems." The researchers found that a protein called KROX20, more commonly associated with nerve development, in this case turns on in skin cells that become the hair shaft. These hair precursor, or progenitor, cells then produce a protein called stem cell factor (SCF) that the researchers showed is essential for hair pigmentation. When they deleted the SCF gene in the hair progenitor cells in mouse models, the animal's hair turned white. When they deleted the KROX20-producing cells, no hair grew and the mice became bald, according to the study. The findings are published online in Genes & Development. Dr. Le, who holds the Thomas L. Shields, M.D. Professorship in Dermatology, said he and his researchers serendipitously uncovered this explanation for balding and hair graying while studying a disorder called Neurofibromatosis Type 1, a rare genetic disease that causes tumors to grow on nerves. Scientists already knew that stem cells contained in a bulge area of hair follicles are involved in making hair and that SCF is important for pigmented cells, said Dr. Le, a member of the Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine. What they did not know in detail is what happens after those stem cells move down to the base, or bulb, of hair follicles and which cells in the hair follicles produce SCF - or that cells involved in hair shaft creation make the KROX20 protein, he said. If cells with functioning KROX20 and SCF are present, they move up from the bulb, interact with pigment-producing melanocyte cells, and grow into pigmented hairs. But without SCF, the hair in mouse models was gray, and then turned white with age, according to the study. Without KROX20-producing cells, no hair grew, the study said. UT Southwestern researchers will now try to find out if the KROX20 in cells and the SCF gene stop working properly as people age, leading to the graying and hair thinning seen in older people - as well as in male pattern baldness, Dr. Le said. The research also could provide answers about why we age in general as hair graying and hair loss are among the first signs of aging. Other researchers include first author Dr. Chung-Ping Liao, Assistant Instructor; Dr. Sean Morrison, Professor and Director of the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern and of Pediatrics, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, who holds the Kathryne and Gene Bishop Distinguished Chair in Pediatric Research at Children's Research Institute at UT Southwestern and the Mary McDermott Cook Chair in Pediatric Genetics; and Reid Booker, a former UT Southwestern researcher. The research was supported by the National Cancer Institute, Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant, National Institutes of Health, the Dermatology Foundation, the Children's Tumor Foundation, and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty has received six Nobel Prizes, and includes 22 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators. The faculty of more than 2,700 is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in about 80 specialties to more than 100,000 hospitalized patients, 600,000 emergency room cases, and oversee approximately 2.2 million outpatient visits a year.


News Article | April 5, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Diagnostic errors are no laughing matter as they may lead to serious threats to the life of the patient. A new study suggests that most patients, analyzed with serious health issues, are initially misdiagnosed. The study, conducted by the researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, reveals that most patients who went for a second opinion saw a change in the results of their original diagnosis. For the study, the researchers reviewed reports of 286 patients who visited primary health care providers from 2009 to 2010. Only 12 percent of those who went for the second round of diagnosis at the Mayo Clinic were found to have been given the correct diagnosis at the first instance. By comparison, 66 percent had a marginally altered diagnosis, whereas a fifth were told they suffered from a different medical condition. The study shared that roughly 21 percent, or 62 cases, showed that the second diagnosis report was "distinctly different" from the initial one. Nearly 12 percent, or 36 cases, had the same diagnosis as the initial assessment. In the remaining 188 cases, the diagnosis reflected that the first assessment was partly correct, but it became refined during the second analysis. According to a 2015 report from the National Academy of Medicine, maximum individuals will get a late or incorrect diagnosis at some juncture in their lives. Occasionally, this may lead to serious consequences. The report gave the example of an estimate where nearly 12 million, or 5 percent adults, who sought outpatient care, were diagnosed incorrectly each year. In 2016, a study published by the John Hopkins University noted that wrong diagnosis, or medical error, was the third leading cause of death in the United States each year, behind only cancer and cardiac diseases. James M. Naessens, a professor at the Mayo Clinic, who led the new study, feels that diagnostic error is an area which requires more research. "The second opinion is a good approach for certain patients to figure out what's there and to keep costs down," noted Naessens. For a patient diagnosed with deadly diseases like cancer or other ailments, which may require surgery, one must always stay safe side and opt for a second diagnosis. "Diagnosis is extremely hard. There are 10,000 diseases and only 200 to 300 symptoms," shared Mark L. Graber, a senior fellow at the research institute RTI International and founder of the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine. Graber, who was not involved in the current study, added that even doctors are human and can make mistakes like everybody else. The study's results have been published in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Global Wellness Summit (GWS) today announced that an all-star lineup of integrative medicine leaders will present at the 2017 conference: Dr. Richard Carmona (former U.S. Surgeon General), Elissa Epel, PhD (telomeres research pioneer, UCSF), Dr. Paul Limburg (Professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic), Dr. Mehmet Oz (Professor of Surgery, Columbia University and host, “The Dr. Oz Show”), Dr. Kenneth R. Pelletier (Professor of Medicine, University of Arizona and UCSF), Dr. Michael Roizen (Chief Wellness Officer, The Cleveland Clinic) and Dr. Andrew Weil (founder, University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and renowned alternative medicine expert). Together, this heavy-hitter roster of experts has transformed the way the world thinks about both wellness and medicine, leading the charge for more holistic, preventive approaches that - as chronic disease and healthcare costs soar - represent one of the most critical trends in the world today. They span celebrity doctors who have brought the “wellness message” to hundreds of millions of people worldwide to doctors who are spearheading a new focus on wellness and prevention at revered medical institutions like the Mayo and Cleveland Clinics. The 2017 Summit theme is “Living a Well Life”, focusing on how new wellness concepts will impact every aspect of an individual’s life. And these leaders, who impact countless individuals’ lives, will keynote on everything from the latest in mind-body medicine and sleep science to the coming wave of personal biomarker and DNA testing. The 11th-annual conference is being held at The Breakers, Palm Beach, Florida from October 9-11, 2017. "The annual Global Wellness Summit has proven to be the premier convener of health and wellness thought leaders from around the world,” said Richard Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS, and 17th Surgeon General of The United States. “This year’s unprecedented meeting in Florida will define the essential role of wellness in a world desperately in need of health innovation and disruption." “This may be the most influential, inspiring and diverse group of medical-wellness pioneers ever assembled on a conference stage,” noted Susie Ellis, GWS CEO and chairman. “And delegates will have the opportunity to interact with them one-on-one during the many networking sessions, lunches and roundtables where casual discussions take place. It will be unprecedented access, something the Summit is known for.” More on the presenters: Richard H. Carmona, MD, M.P.H., FACS, was the 17th Surgeon General of the United States. He is also a combat decorated U.S. Army Special Forces Veteran and a Distinguished Professor at the University of Arizona, with a wide range of training and experience in healthcare management, clinical care and research. He’s currently the Vice Chairman of Canyon Ranch, President of the Canyon Ranch Institute, and serves as Director on several large, publicly traded corporate boards and several private companies. Elissa Epel, PhD, is Professor at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), with a research focus on how chronic psychological stress accelerates biological aging; the interconnections between emotions, eating, metabolism and weight; and the effects of mindfulness. A member of the National Academy of Medicine, she has won many awards for her research. Epel co-wrote (with Nobel Laureate, Elizabeth Blackburn) “The Telomere Effect: The New Science of Living Younger Longer”, a 2017 New York Times bestseller. Paul Limburg, MD, M.P.H., is Professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and consultant in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology. He also holds a joint appointment in the division of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine and serves as medical director for several business units at Mayo Clinic responsible for defining or delivering health and wellbeing expertise within and beyond the organization. Mehmet Oz, MD, is Professor of Surgery at Columbia University and has won seven Daytime Emmy® Awards for “The Dr. Oz Show”. He directs the Complementary Medicine Program at New York Presbyterian Hospital; participates in 50 heart surgeries a year; has authored over 400 publications, including seven New York Times bestsellers; has received numerous patents; and hosts the internationally syndicated “Daily Dose” in 134 radio markets and a newspaper column in 175 global markets. He has received numerous global accolades, from being named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Influential People” to a Global Leader of Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum. Kenneth R. Pelletier, PhD, MD, is Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona and the University of California, San Francisco. At UCSF, he is Director of the Corporate Health Improvement Program (CHIP), a collaborative research program between CHIP and 15 of the Fortune 500. He is Chairman of the American Health Association; medical and business consultant to high-profile organizations like the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization; and has published over 300 professional articles on behavioral and integrative medicine, disease management, worksite interventions, and epigenetics. The author of 13 books, his next, “Change Your Genes, Change Your Life”, will be published this year. Michael Roizen, MD: Since 2008, Dr. Roizen has served as Chief Wellness Officer at Cleveland Clinic, the first such position at a major U.S. healthcare institution. He’s also Chairman of the Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic; has published 175+ peer-reviewed scientific papers, 100 textbook chapters, and four medical books; received 13 U.S. (and many foreign) patents; and hosted six PBS specials. His “RealAge” and “YOU” series of books have sold millions of copies, have been translated into 44 languages, and resulted in four #1 New York Times bestsellers (more than any other physician). Andrew Weil, MD, is Founder and Director of (and Clinical Professor of Medicine at) the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, the leading global effort to develop a comprehensive curriculum in integrative medicine. He is editorial director of the popular website, Dr. Weil.com; has appeared in numerous PBS programs; and is founder of the Weil Foundation, Healthy Lifestyle Brands, and True Food Kitchen restaurants. An internationally recognized expert on medicinal plants, alternative medicine, and medical education reform, he’s authored many scientific articles and 15 popular books - and Oxford University Press is currently producing the Weil Integrative Medicine Library, a series for clinicians in various medical specialties. For more information, contact Beth McGroarty: beth.mcgroarty@globalwellnesssummit.com or (+1) 213-300-0107. For info on attending the 2017 Summit: http://www.globalwellnesssummit.com/2017-summit/ About the Global Wellness Summit: The Global Wellness Summit (GWS) is an invitation-only international gathering that brings together leaders and visionaries to positively shape the future of the $3.7 trillion global wellness economy. Held in a different location each year, Summits have taken place in the U.S., Switzerland, Turkey, Bali, India, Morocco, Mexico and Austria. The next will be held at The Breakers, Palm Beach, Florida from Oct. 9-11, 2017.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

To inspire other physicians who are experiencing the painful effects of stress, Dr. Prashant Kaushik will chronicle his own journey from burnout to homeostasis at the 9th annual CME Conference on Meditation and Yoga as Mind/Body Medicine, October 24-28, 2017 at the Cranwell Resort and Spa in Lenox, Massachusetts. Hosted by the American Meditation Institute and entitled “The Heart and Science of Yoga,” this comprehensive 30 credit-hour mind/body training on meditation, gentle yoga and diaphragmatic breathing, accredited through the Albany Medical College Office of Continuing Medical Education, is designed to help physicians and other healthcare professionals prevent and relieve burnout. Board-certified Rheumatologist Prashant Kaushik, MD knows all too well how the demands and stress of the medical profession can have a profound effect on the personal and professional lives of physicians and their patients. As a healthcare professional dedicated to expanding the current medical paradigm to include “self-care,” Dr. Kaushik will reveal how stress negatively affected his physical and mental wellbeing, and how he was able to transform his life with powerful AMI Meditation practices that reduce stress and enhance resilience and effectiveness. According to Dr. Kaushik, “Simple techniques like AMI mantra meditation, one-pointed attention, diaphragmatic breathing and easy-gentle yoga have been used for millennia to transform the debilitating nature of stress. When the practical tools of Yoga Science as mind/body medicine are incorporated into everyday life, physician burnout can be reversed dramatically and eliminated in many circumstances.” AMI faculty member Prashant Kaushik, MD received a Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery degree from the All India Institute of Medical Services, New Delhi. As a board-certified Rheumatologist, Dr. Kaushik serves as Lead Rheumatologist at the Albany VA Medical Center, Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine Albany Medical College, and is a member of the AMI Department of Medical Education. Dr. Kaushik is the 2015 recipient of the Albany Medical College’s Residency Teacher of the Year award. Defined as a “state of vital exhaustion” by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition, burnout in the medical profession has become a serious public health problem over the past decade. According to a March 2017 paper published on the National Academy of Medicine website, 54 percent of all physicians experience burnout (30–40 percent of employed physicians and 55–60 percent of self-employed physicians). Students, interns, and residents are close behind them, experiencing burnout at a rate of 20–40 percent. Recognizing this alarming trend, The American Meditation Institute is offering this unique mind/body medicine conference to help physicians alleviate their pain and enrich their health and wellbeing. Now in its ninth year of providing continuing medical education credits, the five-day retreat is carefully structured to optimize the experience of attendees. Each lecture is designed to reduce their allostatic load––the physiological consequences of chronic exposure to fluctuating or heightened neural or neuroendocrine responses resulting from chronic stress. The 30-hour CME comprehensive curriculum includes an in-depth study of the historical, philosophical and scientific nature of Yoga Science. Practical yogic skills will be taught to all attendees to expand their knowledge of and experience with health-affirming, yogic practices. Topics will include mantra-based AMI meditation, diaphragmatic breathing, Yoga Psychology, the chakra system as a diagnostic tool, mind function optimization, neuroplasticity, trauma, PTSD, Functional Medicine, Epigenomics, Ayurveda, nutrition, easy-gentle yoga and lymph system detoxification. An outstanding team of dedicated, enthusiastic, skilled health and wellness professionals, who draw on many years of experience in their respective fields, the AMI faculty will create a dynamic and interactive program for all attending medical professionals. In addition to Dr. Kaushik, this year’s presenters will include Leonard Perlmutter, AMI founder, philosopher, meditational therapist and award-winning author of “The Heart and Science of Yoga”; Mark Pettus MD, Director of Medical Education and Population Health at Berkshire Health Systems; Anthony Santilli MD, board-certified in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; Sara Lazar PhD, neuroscientist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and instructor at Harvard Medical School; Susan Lord MD, a private practice holistic physician focusing on prevention and treatment, and former course director for the The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s “Food As Medicine” program in Washington, DC; Jesse Ritvo MD, Assistant Medical Director, Inpatient Psychiatry, University of Vermont Health Center; Beth Netter MD MT, holistic physician and acupuncturist, Albany, NY; Jyothi Bhatt BAMS, Ayurvedic practitioner and faculty member of Kripalu School of Ayurveda and Physician’s Assistant at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center; and Jenness Cortez Perlmutter, senior faculty member of The American Meditation Institute. According to Pamela Shervanick MD, who is a board certified psychiatrist in Barrington, Rhode Island and a recent AMI conference participant, “This conference has been life changing! Everyone in every facet of life should experience this. I’m so grateful for you and your institution and all involved for bringing truth to doctors with love and compassion. This is a light the world needs to see.” In addition to Dr. Shervanick, numerous medical pioneers and healthcare professionals such as Mehmet Oz MD, Dean Ornish MD and Bernie Siegel MD have also endorsed AMI’s core curriculum. Previous conference attendees have also noted that the material presented has made a beneficial impact toward their personal and professional efforts at self-care. About the American Meditation Institute The American Meditation Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization devoted to the teaching and practice of Yoga Science, AMI meditation and its allied disciplines as mind/body medicine. In its holistic approach to wellness, AMI combines the healing arts of the East with the practicality of modern Western science. The American Meditation Institute offers a wide variety of classes, retreats, and teacher training programs. AMI also publishes Transformation a bi-monthly journal of meditation as holistic mind/body medicine. Call (518) 674-8714 for a mail or email subscription.

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