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News Article | April 5, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Diagnostic errors are no laughing matter as they may lead to serious threats to the life of the patient. A new study suggests that most patients, analyzed with serious health issues, are initially misdiagnosed. The study, conducted by the researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, reveals that most patients who went for a second opinion saw a change in the results of their original diagnosis. For the study, the researchers reviewed reports of 286 patients who visited primary health care providers from 2009 to 2010. Only 12 percent of those who went for the second round of diagnosis at the Mayo Clinic were found to have been given the correct diagnosis at the first instance. By comparison, 66 percent had a marginally altered diagnosis, whereas a fifth were told they suffered from a different medical condition. The study shared that roughly 21 percent, or 62 cases, showed that the second diagnosis report was "distinctly different" from the initial one. Nearly 12 percent, or 36 cases, had the same diagnosis as the initial assessment. In the remaining 188 cases, the diagnosis reflected that the first assessment was partly correct, but it became refined during the second analysis. According to a 2015 report from the National Academy of Medicine, maximum individuals will get a late or incorrect diagnosis at some juncture in their lives. Occasionally, this may lead to serious consequences. The report gave the example of an estimate where nearly 12 million, or 5 percent adults, who sought outpatient care, were diagnosed incorrectly each year. In 2016, a study published by the John Hopkins University noted that wrong diagnosis, or medical error, was the third leading cause of death in the United States each year, behind only cancer and cardiac diseases. James M. Naessens, a professor at the Mayo Clinic, who led the new study, feels that diagnostic error is an area which requires more research. "The second opinion is a good approach for certain patients to figure out what's there and to keep costs down," noted Naessens. For a patient diagnosed with deadly diseases like cancer or other ailments, which may require surgery, one must always stay safe side and opt for a second diagnosis. "Diagnosis is extremely hard. There are 10,000 diseases and only 200 to 300 symptoms," shared Mark L. Graber, a senior fellow at the research institute RTI International and founder of the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine. Graber, who was not involved in the current study, added that even doctors are human and can make mistakes like everybody else. The study's results have been published in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

To inspire other physicians who are experiencing the painful effects of stress, Dr. Prashant Kaushik will chronicle his own journey from burnout to homeostasis at the 9th annual CME Conference on Meditation and Yoga as Mind/Body Medicine, October 24-28, 2017 at the Cranwell Resort and Spa in Lenox, Massachusetts. Hosted by the American Meditation Institute and entitled “The Heart and Science of Yoga,” this comprehensive 30 credit-hour mind/body training on meditation, gentle yoga and diaphragmatic breathing, accredited through the Albany Medical College Office of Continuing Medical Education, is designed to help physicians and other healthcare professionals prevent and relieve burnout. Board-certified Rheumatologist Prashant Kaushik, MD knows all too well how the demands and stress of the medical profession can have a profound effect on the personal and professional lives of physicians and their patients. As a healthcare professional dedicated to expanding the current medical paradigm to include “self-care,” Dr. Kaushik will reveal how stress negatively affected his physical and mental wellbeing, and how he was able to transform his life with powerful AMI Meditation practices that reduce stress and enhance resilience and effectiveness. According to Dr. Kaushik, “Simple techniques like AMI mantra meditation, one-pointed attention, diaphragmatic breathing and easy-gentle yoga have been used for millennia to transform the debilitating nature of stress. When the practical tools of Yoga Science as mind/body medicine are incorporated into everyday life, physician burnout can be reversed dramatically and eliminated in many circumstances.” AMI faculty member Prashant Kaushik, MD received a Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery degree from the All India Institute of Medical Services, New Delhi. As a board-certified Rheumatologist, Dr. Kaushik serves as Lead Rheumatologist at the Albany VA Medical Center, Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine Albany Medical College, and is a member of the AMI Department of Medical Education. Dr. Kaushik is the 2015 recipient of the Albany Medical College’s Residency Teacher of the Year award. Defined as a “state of vital exhaustion” by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition, burnout in the medical profession has become a serious public health problem over the past decade. According to a March 2017 paper published on the National Academy of Medicine website, 54 percent of all physicians experience burnout (30–40 percent of employed physicians and 55–60 percent of self-employed physicians). Students, interns, and residents are close behind them, experiencing burnout at a rate of 20–40 percent. Recognizing this alarming trend, The American Meditation Institute is offering this unique mind/body medicine conference to help physicians alleviate their pain and enrich their health and wellbeing. Now in its ninth year of providing continuing medical education credits, the five-day retreat is carefully structured to optimize the experience of attendees. Each lecture is designed to reduce their allostatic load––the physiological consequences of chronic exposure to fluctuating or heightened neural or neuroendocrine responses resulting from chronic stress. The 30-hour CME comprehensive curriculum includes an in-depth study of the historical, philosophical and scientific nature of Yoga Science. Practical yogic skills will be taught to all attendees to expand their knowledge of and experience with health-affirming, yogic practices. Topics will include mantra-based AMI meditation, diaphragmatic breathing, Yoga Psychology, the chakra system as a diagnostic tool, mind function optimization, neuroplasticity, trauma, PTSD, Functional Medicine, Epigenomics, Ayurveda, nutrition, easy-gentle yoga and lymph system detoxification. An outstanding team of dedicated, enthusiastic, skilled health and wellness professionals, who draw on many years of experience in their respective fields, the AMI faculty will create a dynamic and interactive program for all attending medical professionals. In addition to Dr. Kaushik, this year’s presenters will include Leonard Perlmutter, AMI founder, philosopher, meditational therapist and award-winning author of “The Heart and Science of Yoga”; Mark Pettus MD, Director of Medical Education and Population Health at Berkshire Health Systems; Anthony Santilli MD, board-certified in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; Sara Lazar PhD, neuroscientist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and instructor at Harvard Medical School; Susan Lord MD, a private practice holistic physician focusing on prevention and treatment, and former course director for the The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s “Food As Medicine” program in Washington, DC; Jesse Ritvo MD, Assistant Medical Director, Inpatient Psychiatry, University of Vermont Health Center; Beth Netter MD MT, holistic physician and acupuncturist, Albany, NY; Jyothi Bhatt BAMS, Ayurvedic practitioner and faculty member of Kripalu School of Ayurveda and Physician’s Assistant at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center; and Jenness Cortez Perlmutter, senior faculty member of The American Meditation Institute. According to Pamela Shervanick MD, who is a board certified psychiatrist in Barrington, Rhode Island and a recent AMI conference participant, “This conference has been life changing! Everyone in every facet of life should experience this. I’m so grateful for you and your institution and all involved for bringing truth to doctors with love and compassion. This is a light the world needs to see.” In addition to Dr. Shervanick, numerous medical pioneers and healthcare professionals such as Mehmet Oz MD, Dean Ornish MD and Bernie Siegel MD have also endorsed AMI’s core curriculum. Previous conference attendees have also noted that the material presented has made a beneficial impact toward their personal and professional efforts at self-care. About the American Meditation Institute The American Meditation Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization devoted to the teaching and practice of Yoga Science, AMI meditation and its allied disciplines as mind/body medicine. In its holistic approach to wellness, AMI combines the healing arts of the East with the practicality of modern Western science. The American Meditation Institute offers a wide variety of classes, retreats, and teacher training programs. AMI also publishes Transformation a bi-monthly journal of meditation as holistic mind/body medicine. Call (518) 674-8714 for a mail or email subscription.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

All stakeholders in the scientific research enterprise -- researchers, institutions, publishers, funders, scientific societies, and federal agencies - should improve their practices and policies to respond to threats to the integrity of research WASHINGTON - All stakeholders in the scientific research enterprise -- researchers, institutions, publishers, funders, scientific societies, and federal agencies - should improve their practices and policies to respond to threats to the integrity of research, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Actions are needed to ensure the availability of data necessary for reproducing research, clarify authorship standards, protect whistleblowers, and make sure that negative as well as positive research findings are reported, among other steps. The report stresses the important role played by institutions and environments - not only individual researchers -- in supporting scientific integrity. And it recommends the establishment of an independent, nonprofit Research Integrity Advisory Board to support ongoing efforts to strengthen research integrity. The board should work with all stakeholders in the research enterprise to share expertise and approaches for minimizing and addressing research misconduct and detrimental practices. "The research enterprise is not broken, but it faces significant challenges in creating the conditions needed to foster and sustain the highest standards of integrity," said Robert Nerem, chair of the committee that wrote the report, and Institute Professor and Parker H. Petit Professor Emeritus, Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology. "To meet these challenges, all parties in the research enterprise need to take deliberate steps to strengthen the self-correcting mechanisms that are part of research and to better align the realities of research with its values and ideals." A growing body of evidence indicates that substantial percentages of published results in some fields are not reproducible, the report says, noting that this is a complex phenomenon and much remains to be learned. While a certain level of irreproducibility due to unknown variables or errors is a normal part of research, data falsification and detrimental research practices -- such as inappropriate use of statistics or after-the-fact fitting of hypotheses to previously collected data -- apparently also play a role. In addition, new forms of detrimental research practices are appearing, such as predatory journals that do little or no editorial review or quality control of papers while charging authors substantial fees. And the number of retractions of journal articles has increased, with a significant percentage of those retractions due to research misconduct. The report cautions, however, that this increase does not necessarily indicate that the incidence of misconduct is increasing, as more-vigilant scrutiny by the community may be a contributing factor. The report endorses the definition of scientific misconduct proposed in the 1992 Academies report Responsible Science: "fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reporting research." However, many practices that have until now been categorized as "questionable" research practices - for example, misleading use of statistics that falls short of falsification, and failure to retain research data -- should be recognized as "detrimental" research practices, the new report says. Detrimental research practices should be understood to include not only actions of individual researchers but also irresponsible or abusive actions by research institutions and journals. "The research process goes beyond the actions of individual researchers," said Nerem. "Research institutions, journals, scientific societies, and other parts of the research enterprise all can act in ways that either support or undermine integrity in research." Because research institutions play a central role in fostering research integrity, they should maintain the highest standards for research conduct, going beyond simple compliance with federal regulations and applying these standards to all research independent of the source of funding. Institutions' key responsibilities include creating and sustaining a research culture that fosters integrity and encourages adherence to best practices, as well as monitoring the integrity of their research environments. Senior leaders at each institution -- the president, other senior executives, and faculty leaders -- should guide and be actively engaged in these tasks. Furthermore, they must have the capacity to effectively investigate and address allegations of research misconduct and to address the conflict of interest that institutions may have in conducting these investigations -- for example, by incorporating external perspectives. In addition, research institutions and federal agencies should ensure that good faith whistleblowers - those who raise concerns about the integrity of research - are protected and their concerns addressed in a fair, thorough, and timely manner. Inadequate responses to such concerns have been a critical point of failure in many cases of misconduct where investigations were delayed or sidetracked. Currently, standards for transparency in many fields and disciplines do not adequately support reproducibility and the ability to build on previous work, the report says. Research sponsors and publishers should ensure that the information needed for a person knowledgeable about the field and its techniques to reproduce the reported results is made available at the time of publication or as soon as possible after that. Federal funding agencies and other research sponsors should also allocate sufficient funds to enable the long-term storage, archiving, and access of datasets and code necessary to replicate published findings. Researchers should routinely disclose all statistical tests carried out, including negative findings, the report says. Available evidence indicates that scientific publications are biased against presenting negative results and that the publication of negative results is on the decline. But routine reporting of negative findings will help avoid unproductive duplication of research and make research spending more productive. Dissemination of negative results also has prompted a questioning of established paradigms, leading ultimately to groundbreaking new discoveries. Research sponsors, research institutions, and journals should support and encourage this level of transparency. Scientific societies and journals should develop clear disciplinary authorship standards based on the principle that those who have made a significant intellectual contribution are authors. Those who engage in these activities should be designated as authors, and all authors should approve the final manuscript. Universal condemnation by all disciplines of gift or honorary authorship, coercive authorship, and ghost authorship would also contribute to changing the culture of research environments where these practices are still accepted. To bring a unified focus to addressing challenges in fostering research integrity across all disciplines and sectors, the report urges the establishment of a nonprofit, independent Research Integrity Advisory Board. The RIAB could facilitate the exchange of information on approaches to assessing and creating environments of the highest integrity and to handling allegations of misconduct and investigations. It could provide advice, support, encouragement, and where helpful advocacy on what needs to be done by research institutions, journal and book publishers, and other stakeholders in the research enterprise. The RIAB would have no direct role in investigations, regulation, or accreditation; instead it will serve as a neutral resource that helps the research enterprise respond to challenges. In addition, the report recommends that government agencies and private foundations fund research to quantify conditions in the research environment that may be linked to research misconduct and detrimental research practices, and to develop responses to these conditions. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey of the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Office of Research Integrity of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of the Inspector General of the National Science Foundation, the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Society for Neuroscience, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are private, nonprofit institutions that provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology, and medicine. They operate under an 1863 congressional charter to the National Academy of Sciences, signed by President Lincoln. For more information, visit http://national-academies. . A roster follows. Sara Frueh, Media Officer Joshua Blatt, Media Assistant Office of News and Public Information 202-334-2138; e-mail news@nas.edu national-academies.org/newsroom Follow us on Twitter at @theNASEM Copies of Fostering Integrity in Research are available from the National Academies Press on the Internet at http://www. or by calling 202-334-3313 or 1-800-624-6242. Reporters may obtain a copy from the Office of News and Public Information (contacts listed above). Robert M. Nerem1,2 (chair) Institute Professor and Parker H. Petit Professor Emeritus Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta Ann M. Arvin2 Lucile Packard Professor of Pediatrics, Vice Provost and Dean of Research, and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology Stanford University Stanford, Calif. C.K. (Tina) Gunsalus Director National Center for Professional and Research Ethics University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Deborah G. Johnson Anne Shirley Carter Olsson Professor Emeritus of Applied Ethics Department of Science, Technology, and Society School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Virginia Charlottesville Michael A. Keller Ida M. Green University Librarian, and Director of Academic Information Resources University Libraries and Academic Information Resources Stanford University Stanford, Calif. W. Carl Lineberger3 E.U. Condon Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, and Fellow JILA University of Colorado Boulder Victoria Stodden Associate Professor of Statistics Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Sara E. Wilson Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Academic Director Bioengineering Graduate Program University of Kansas Lawrence Paul R. Wolpe Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Bioethics, and Director Center for Ethics Emory University Atlanta 1 Member, National Academy of Engineering 2 Member, National Academy of Medicine 3 Member, National Academy of Sciences


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Global Wellness Summit (GWS) today announced that an all-star lineup of integrative medicine leaders will present at the 2017 conference: Dr. Richard Carmona (former U.S. Surgeon General), Elissa Epel, PhD (telomeres research pioneer, UCSF), Dr. Paul Limburg (Professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic), Dr. Mehmet Oz (Professor of Surgery, Columbia University and host, “The Dr. Oz Show”), Dr. Kenneth R. Pelletier (Professor of Medicine, University of Arizona and UCSF), Dr. Michael Roizen (Chief Wellness Officer, The Cleveland Clinic) and Dr. Andrew Weil (founder, University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and renowned alternative medicine expert). Together, this heavy-hitter roster of experts has transformed the way the world thinks about both wellness and medicine, leading the charge for more holistic, preventive approaches that - as chronic disease and healthcare costs soar - represent one of the most critical trends in the world today. They span celebrity doctors who have brought the “wellness message” to hundreds of millions of people worldwide to doctors who are spearheading a new focus on wellness and prevention at revered medical institutions like the Mayo and Cleveland Clinics. The 2017 Summit theme is “Living a Well Life”, focusing on how new wellness concepts will impact every aspect of an individual’s life. And these leaders, who impact countless individuals’ lives, will keynote on everything from the latest in mind-body medicine and sleep science to the coming wave of personal biomarker and DNA testing. The 11th-annual conference is being held at The Breakers, Palm Beach, Florida from October 9-11, 2017. "The annual Global Wellness Summit has proven to be the premier convener of health and wellness thought leaders from around the world,” said Richard Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS, and 17th Surgeon General of The United States. “This year’s unprecedented meeting in Florida will define the essential role of wellness in a world desperately in need of health innovation and disruption." “This may be the most influential, inspiring and diverse group of medical-wellness pioneers ever assembled on a conference stage,” noted Susie Ellis, GWS CEO and chairman. “And delegates will have the opportunity to interact with them one-on-one during the many networking sessions, lunches and roundtables where casual discussions take place. It will be unprecedented access, something the Summit is known for.” More on the presenters: Richard H. Carmona, MD, M.P.H., FACS, was the 17th Surgeon General of the United States. He is also a combat decorated U.S. Army Special Forces Veteran and a Distinguished Professor at the University of Arizona, with a wide range of training and experience in healthcare management, clinical care and research. He’s currently the Vice Chairman of Canyon Ranch, President of the Canyon Ranch Institute, and serves as Director on several large, publicly traded corporate boards and several private companies. Elissa Epel, PhD, is Professor at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), with a research focus on how chronic psychological stress accelerates biological aging; the interconnections between emotions, eating, metabolism and weight; and the effects of mindfulness. A member of the National Academy of Medicine, she has won many awards for her research. Epel co-wrote (with Nobel Laureate, Elizabeth Blackburn) “The Telomere Effect: The New Science of Living Younger Longer”, a 2017 New York Times bestseller. Paul Limburg, MD, M.P.H., is Professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and consultant in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology. He also holds a joint appointment in the division of preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine and serves as medical director for several business units at Mayo Clinic responsible for defining or delivering health and wellbeing expertise within and beyond the organization. Mehmet Oz, MD, is Professor of Surgery at Columbia University and has won seven Daytime Emmy® Awards for “The Dr. Oz Show”. He directs the Complementary Medicine Program at New York Presbyterian Hospital; participates in 50 heart surgeries a year; has authored over 400 publications, including seven New York Times bestsellers; has received numerous patents; and hosts the internationally syndicated “Daily Dose” in 134 radio markets and a newspaper column in 175 global markets. He has received numerous global accolades, from being named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Influential People” to a Global Leader of Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum. Kenneth R. Pelletier, PhD, MD, is Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona and the University of California, San Francisco. At UCSF, he is Director of the Corporate Health Improvement Program (CHIP), a collaborative research program between CHIP and 15 of the Fortune 500. He is Chairman of the American Health Association; medical and business consultant to high-profile organizations like the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization; and has published over 300 professional articles on behavioral and integrative medicine, disease management, worksite interventions, and epigenetics. The author of 13 books, his next, “Change Your Genes, Change Your Life”, will be published this year. Michael Roizen, MD: Since 2008, Dr. Roizen has served as Chief Wellness Officer at Cleveland Clinic, the first such position at a major U.S. healthcare institution. He’s also Chairman of the Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic; has published 175+ peer-reviewed scientific papers, 100 textbook chapters, and four medical books; received 13 U.S. (and many foreign) patents; and hosted six PBS specials. His “RealAge” and “YOU” series of books have sold millions of copies, have been translated into 44 languages, and resulted in four #1 New York Times bestsellers (more than any other physician). Andrew Weil, MD, is Founder and Director of (and Clinical Professor of Medicine at) the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, the leading global effort to develop a comprehensive curriculum in integrative medicine. He is editorial director of the popular website, Dr. Weil.com; has appeared in numerous PBS programs; and is founder of the Weil Foundation, Healthy Lifestyle Brands, and True Food Kitchen restaurants. An internationally recognized expert on medicinal plants, alternative medicine, and medical education reform, he’s authored many scientific articles and 15 popular books - and Oxford University Press is currently producing the Weil Integrative Medicine Library, a series for clinicians in various medical specialties. For more information, contact Beth McGroarty: beth.mcgroarty@globalwellnesssummit.com or (+1) 213-300-0107. For info on attending the 2017 Summit: http://www.globalwellnesssummit.com/2017-summit/ About the Global Wellness Summit: The Global Wellness Summit (GWS) is an invitation-only international gathering that brings together leaders and visionaries to positively shape the future of the $3.7 trillion global wellness economy. Held in a different location each year, Summits have taken place in the U.S., Switzerland, Turkey, Bali, India, Morocco, Mexico and Austria. The next will be held at The Breakers, Palm Beach, Florida from Oct. 9-11, 2017.

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