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Barbero E.,Fusion for Energy F4E | Batista R.,Fusion for Energy F4E | Bellesia B.,Fusion for Energy F4E | Bonito-Oliva A.,Fusion for Energy F4E | And 20 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity | Year: 2012

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is an international scientific project with the aim of building a tokamak fusion reactor capable of producing at least 10 times more energy than that spent to sustain the reaction. In a tokamak the fusion reaction is magnetically confined and the toroidal field coil system plays a primary role in this confinement. Fusion for Energy, the European Domestic Agency for ITER, is responsible for the supply of 10 out the 19 toroidal field coils. Their procurement has been subdivided in three main work packages: the production of 70 radial plates (the structural components which will house the conductors), the manufacture of 10 winding packs (the core of the magnet) and cold test and insertion into the coil cases of 10 winding packs. The cold test/insertion work package presents significant technological challenges. These include the cold test of the winding packs 14 m high, 9 m wide and weighing 110 t, the welding and inspection of the 316 LN stainless steel coil case, with welded thicknesses of up to 144 mm accessible only from one side combined with the need to minimize the deformation during the welding process (more than 70 m of weld per coil and up to 90 passes to fill the chamfer) and the resin filling of the coil case after insertion of the winding pack (the total volume to be filled up is about one cubic meter per coil). From 2009 up to mid 2011, F4E has carried out an R&D program in order to investigate the most challenging steps of the manufacturing processes associated to this work package, both to meet the demands of the ITER schedule and to minimize technological risks; in this paper an overview of the results obtained is presented. © 2011 IEEE.


Giacomin T.,ITER Organization | Delhom D.,Bertin Technologies | Drevon J.-M.,Bertin Technologies | Guirao J.,NATEC Ingenieros | And 12 more authors.
Fusion Engineering and Design | Year: 2015

Due to this position close to the plasma, the port plug structure and the diagnostic first wall (DFW) contain water to allow cooling during operation and for heating during bake-out. To remove the heat coming from the plasma due to radiation and neutrons, the pressure inside these structures should be up to 44 bars. On the other hand, the dominant load expected to drive the design of these structures is of electromagnetic origin during the plasma disruption. Description of the loads acting on DFWs and generic port plug structures and the significance of the load due to the water pressure, with implications on the design and inspection, are discussed in this paper. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Udintsev V.S.,ITER Organization | Maquet P.,ITER Organization | Alexandrov E.,Russian Federation Domestic Agency | Casal N.,ITER Organization | And 24 more authors.
Fusion Engineering and Design | Year: 2015

The Diagnostic Generic Equatorial Port Plug (GEPP) is designed to be common to all equatorial port-based diagnostic systems. It is designed to survive throughout the lifetime of ITER for 20 years, 30,000 discharges, and 3000 disruptions. The EPP structure dimensions (without Diagnostic First Walls and Diagnostic Shield Modules) are L2.9 × W1.9 × H2.4 m3. The length of the fully integrated EPP is 3174 mm. The weight of the EPP structure is about 15 t, whereas the total weight of the integrated EPP may be up to 45 t. The EPP structure provides a flexible platform for a variety of diagnostics. The Diagnostic Shield Module assemblies, or drawers, allow a modular approach with respect to diagnostic integration and maintenance. In the nuclear phase of ITER operations, they will be remotely inserted into the EPP structure in the Hot Cell Facility. The port plug structure must also contribute to the nuclear shielding, or plugging, of the port and further contain circulated water to allow cooling during operation and heating during bake-out. The Final Design of the GEPP has been successfully passed in late 2013 and is now heading toward manufacturing. The final design of the GEPP includes interfaces, manufacturing, R&D, operation and maintenance, load cases and analysis of failure modes. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Udintsev V.S.,ITER Organization | Maquet P.,ITER Organization | Alexandrov E.,Russia Domestic Agency | Casal N.,ITER Organization | And 24 more authors.
Fusion Engineering and Design | Year: 2015

The Diagnostic Generic Equatorial Port Plug (GEPP) is designed to be common to all equatorial port-based diagnostic systems. It is designed to survive throughout the lifetime of ITER for 20 years, 30,000 discharges, and 3000 disruptions. The EPP structure dimensions (without Diagnostic First Walls and Diagnostic Shield Modules) are L2.9×W1.9×H2.4m3. The length of the fully integrated EPP is 3174mm. The weight of the EPP structure is about 15t, whereas the total weight of the integrated EPP may be up to 45t. The EPP structure provides a flexible platform for a variety of diagnostics. The Diagnostic Shield Module assemblies, or drawers, allow a modular approach with respect to diagnostic integration and maintenance. In the nuclear phase of ITER operations, they will be remotely inserted into the EPP structure in the Hot Cell Facility. The port plug structure must also contribute to the nuclear shielding, or plugging, of the port and further contain circulated water to allow cooling during operation and heating during bake-out. The Final Design of the GEPP has been successfully passed in late 2013 and is now heading toward manufacturing. The final design of the GEPP includes interfaces, manufacturing, R&D, operation and maintenance, load cases and analysis of failure modes. © 2015.

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