Nassau Suffolk

Nassau, NY, United States

Nassau Suffolk

Nassau, NY, United States
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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

John’s Crazy Socks, an online sock store that spreads happiness through socks, is donating to the Autism Society of America’s Nassau/Suffolk Chapter $1 for every pair of Autism Awareness Socks sold. Mark X. Cronin, co-founder of the company said, “We want to honor the achievements, contributions and struggles of people with autism. By offering this sock, we help raise awareness of autism and raise money to support individuals with autism and their families.” The socks feature the multi-colored puzzle that has become associated with autism. The design represents the puzzling nature of the condition as well as the many varied contributions that people with autism make to society. The bright colors signify the hope that comes from increased awareness. The socks were designed and made by SockSmith, a cutting edge sock design shop in Santa Cruz, California. People can purchase the Autism Awareness Socks here. John’s Crazy Socks was co-founded and inspired by John Cronin, a young man with Down Syndrome, and we have a mission to spread happiness through socks. Through John’s work in the company every day, John’s Crazy Socks demonstrates that people should not be judged on their limitations, but on the difference they make for others. John’s Crazy Socks offers socks that people can love: beautiful colorful, fun and crazy socks that let people express their passions and personalities. We deliver the socks through fast and personal service and every package includes a hand-written thank you note from John. The company ships world-wide, but John still makes personal local deliveries. John says, “I like to meet our customers and make them happy.” Giving back is part of the core mission of John’s Crazy Socks. The company has pledged five percent of its earnings to the Special Olympics. John is a Special Olympics athlete and he and his family have witnessed the positive impact the Special Olympics has on so many lives. It was John who initiated the project to do something for people affected by autism. John says, “Some of my best friends have autism and people should know how great they are.” The idea was simple. Find a sock that was beautiful and would help raise awareness about autism. To further the cause, the firm decided to donate $1 from the sale of each sock to the Autism Society of America Nassau/Suffolk Chapter. “We chose the Nassau Suffolk Autism Society of America (NSASA) based on feedback from our customers, our Facebook community and families we know affected by autism,” explained Mark X. Cronin. NSASA has a mission to provide lifelong access and opportunity for all individuals within the autism spectrum and their families. They offer events and programs and conduct education and advocacy initiatives at the local, state and federal levels. “We were touched by the level of personal commitment to the families affected by autism. To learn more about the Nassau Suffolk Autism Society of America (NSASA), you can visit their website or call (516) 404-2306. You can learn more about John and John’s Crazy Socks at our website and our Facebook page. You can also call 631-760-5625 or reach us via email at service(at)johnscrazysocks.com.


Cooper H.L.F.,Emory University | Linton S.,Emory University | Kelley M.E.,Emory University | Ross Z.,Zev Ross Spatial Analysis | And 72 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Introduction: We analyzed relationships between place characteristics and being HIV-negative among black, Latino, and white people who inject drugs (PWID) in the US. Methods: Data on PWID (N = 9077) were from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance. Administrative data were analyzed to describe the 968 ZIP codes, 51 counties, and 19 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) where they lived. Multilevel multivariable models examined relationships between place characteristics and HIV status. Exploratory population attributable risk percents (e-PAR %s) were estimated. Results: Black and Latino PWID were more likely tobe HIV-negative if they lived in less economically disadvantaged counties, or in MSAs with less criminal-justice activity (i.e., lower drug-related arrest rates, lower policing/corrections expenditures). Latino PWID were more likely to be HIV-negative in MSAs with more Latino isolation, less black isolation, and less violent crime. E-PAR%s attributed 8-19% of HIV cases among black PWID and 1-15% of cases among Latino PWID to place characteristics. Discussion: Evaluations of structural interventions to improve economic conditions and reduce drug-related criminal justice activity may show evidence that they protect black and Latino PWID from HIV infection.


Hoots B.E.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Finlayson T.J.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Wejnert C.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Paz-Bailey G.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | And 80 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Early linkage to care and antiretroviral (ARV) treatment are associated with reduced HIV transmission. Male-to-male sexual contact represents the largest HIV transmission category in the United States; men who have sex with men (MSM) are an important focus of care and treatment efforts. With the release of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and expanded HIV treatment guidelines, increases in early linkage to care and ARV treatment are expected.We examined differences in prevalence of early linkage to care and ARV treatment among HIV-positiveMSM between 2008 and 2011. Data are from the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, which monitors behaviors among populations at high risk of HIV infection in 20 U.S. cities with high AIDS burden. MSM were recruited through venuebased, time-space sampling. Prevalence ratios comparing 2011 to 2008 were estimated using linearmixed models. Early linkage was defined as an HIV clinic visit within 3 months of diagnosis. ARV treatment was defined as use at interview. Prevalence of early linkage to care was 79%(187/236) in 2008 and 83%(241/291) in 2011. Inmultivariable analysis, prevalence of early linkage did not differ significantly between years overall (P = 0.44). Prevalence of ARV treatment was 69% (790/1,142) in 2008 and 79%(1,049/1,336) in 2001. In multivariable analysis, ARV treatment increased overall (P = 0.0003) and among most sub-groups. Black MSM were less likely than white MSM to report ARV treatment (P = 0.01).While early linkage to care did not increase significantly between 2008 and 2011, ARV treatment increased among most sub-groups. Progress is being made in getting MSM on HIV treatment, but more efforts are needed to decrease disparities in ARV coverage.


Sionean C.,National Center for HIV AIDS | Le B.C.,National Center for HIV AIDS | Hageman K.,National Center for HIV AIDS | Oster A.M.,National Center for HIV AIDS | And 59 more authors.
MMWR Surveillance Summaries | Year: 2014

Problem/Condition: At the end of 2010, an estimated 872,990 persons in the United States were living with a diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Approximately one in four of the estimated HIV infections diagnosed in 2011 were attributed to heterosexual contact. Heterosexuals with a low socioeconomic status (SES) are disproportionately likely to be infected with HIV. Reporting Period: June-December 2010. Description of System: The National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS) collects HIV prevalence and risk behavior data in selected metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) from three populations at high risk for HIV infection: men who have sex with men, injecting drug users, and heterosexuals at increased risk for HIV infection. Data for NHBS are collected in rotating cycles in these three different populations. For the 2010 NHBS cycle among heterosexuals, men and women were eligible to participate if they were aged 18-60 years, lived in a participating MSA, were able to complete a behavioral survey in English or Spanish, and reported engaging in vaginal or anal sex with one or more opposite-sex partners in the 12 months before the interview. Persons who consented to participate completed an interviewer-administered, standardized questionnaire about HIVassociated behaviors and were offered anonymous HIV testing. Participants were sampled using respondent-driven sampling, a type of chain-referral sampling. Sampling focused on persons of low SES (i.e., income at the poverty level or no more than a high school education) because results of a pilot study indicated that heterosexual adults of low SES were more likely than those of high SES to be infected with HIV. To assess risk and testing experiences among persons at risk for acquiring HIV infection through heterosexual sex, analyses excluded participants who were not low SES, those who reported ever having tested positive for HIV, and those who reported recent (i.e., in the 12 months before the interview) male-male sex or injection drug use. This report summarizes unweighted data regarding HIV-associated risk, prevention, and testing behaviors from 9,278 heterosexual men and women interviewed in 2010 (the second cycle of NHBS data collection among heterosexuals). Results: The median age of participants was 35 years; 47% were men. The majority of participants were black or African American (hereafter referred to as black) (72%) or Hispanic/Latino (21%). Most participants (men: 88%; women: 90%) reported having vaginal sex without a condom with one or more opposite-sex partners in the past 12 months; approximately one third (men: 30%; women: 29%) reported anal sex without a condom with one or more opposite-sex partners. The majority of participants (59%) reported using noninjection drugs in the 12 months before the interview; nearly one in seven (15%) had used crack cocaine. Although most participants (men: 71%; women: 77%) had ever been tested for HIV, this percentage was lower among Hispanic/Latino participants (men: 52%; women: 62%). Approximately one third (34%) of participants reported receiving free condoms in the 12 months before the interview; 11% reported participating in a behavioral HIV prevention program. Interpretation: A substantial proportion of heterosexuals interviewed for the 2010 NHBS heterosexual cycle reported engaging in behaviors that increase the risk for HIV infection. However, HIV testing was suboptimal among the overall sample, including among groups disproportionately affected by HIV infection (i.e., blacks and Hispanics/Latinos). Public Health Action: Increasing coverage of HIV testing and other HIV prevention services among heterosexuals at increased risk is important, especially among groups disproportionately affected by HIV infection, such as blacks and Hispanics/Latinos. The National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States delineates a coordinated national response to reduce infections and HIVrelated health disparities among disproportionately affected groups. NHBS data can guide national and local planning efforts maximize the impact of HIV prevention programs.


Hess K.L.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Chavez P.R.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Kanny D.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | DiNenno E.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | And 83 more authors.
Drug and Alcohol Dependence | Year: 2015

Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM) represent over half of new HIV infections in the United States. It is important to understand the factors associated with engaging in risky sexual behavior to develop effective prevention interventions. Binge drinking (≥5 drinks on ≥1 occasion) is the most common form of excessive alcohol consumption. This study examines the relationship between binge drinking and sexual risk behaviors among MSM who are current drinkers and who were either HIV-negative or unaware of their HIV status. Methods: Using the 2011 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system and multivariable Poisson models with robust error estimates, we assessed the association between binge drinking and sexual risk behaviors among current drinkers. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: Overall, 85% of MSM were current drinkers, and 59% of MSM who drank reported ≥1 episode of binge drinking in the preceding 30 days. In multivariable models, binge drinking was associated with condomless anal intercourse (CAI) at last sex with an HIV-positive or unknown status partner (receptive: PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.6; insertive: PR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.4), having exchanged sex for money or drugs at last sex (PR: 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7), having concurrent partners in the past year (PR: 1.1, 95% CI 1.1-1.2), and having more CAI partners in the past year (PR: 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.4) compared to non-binge drinkers. Conclusions: Evidence-based strategies for reducing binge drinking could help reduce risky sexual behavior among MSM. © 2014.


Cooper H.L.F.,Emory University | Linton S.,Emory University | Kelley M.E.,Emory University | Ross Z.,ZevRoss SpatialAnalysis | And 73 more authors.
International Journal of Drug Policy | Year: 2016

Background: Substantial racial/ethnic disparities exist in HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID) in many countries. To strengthen efforts to understand the causes of disparities in HIV-related outcomes and eliminate them, we expand the "Risk Environment Model" to encompass the construct "racialized risk environments," and investigate whether PWID risk environments in the United States are racialized. Specifically, we investigate whether black and Latino PWID are more likely than white PWID to live in places that create vulnerability to adverse HIV-related outcomes. Methods: As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 9170 PWID were sampled from 19 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in 2009. Self-reported data were used to ascertain PWID race/ethnicity. Using Census data and other administrative sources, we characterized features of PWID risk environments at four geographic scales (i.e., ZIP codes, counties, MSAs, and states). Means for each feature of the risk environment were computed for each racial/ethnic group of PWID, and were compared across racial/ethnic groups. Results: Almost universally across measures, black PWID were more likely than white PWID to live in environments associated with vulnerability to adverse HIV-related outcomes. Compared to white PWID, black PWID lived in ZIP codes with higher poverty rates and worse spatial access to substance abuse treatment and in counties with higher violent crime rates. Black PWID were less likely to live in states with laws facilitating sterile syringe access (e.g., laws permitting over-the-counter syringe sales). Latino/white differences in risk environments emerged at the MSA level (e.g., Latino PWID lived in MSAs with higher drug-related arrest rates). Conclusion: PWID risk environments in the US are racialized. Future research should explore the implications of this racialization for racial/ethnic disparities in HIV-related outcomes, using appropriate methods. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Hoots B.E.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Finlayson T.J.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Wejnert C.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Paz-Bailey G.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | And 81 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Early linkage to care and antiretroviral (ARV) treatment are associated with reduced HIV transmission. Male-to-male sexual contact represents the largest HIV transmission category in the United States; men who have sex with men (MSM) are an important focus of care and treatment efforts. With the release of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and expanded HIV treatment guidelines, increases in early linkage to care and ARV treatment are expected.We examined differences in prevalence of early linkage to care and ARV treatment among HIV-positiveMSM between 2008 and 2011. Data are from the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, which monitors behaviors among populations at high risk of HIV infection in 20 U.S. cities with high AIDS burden. MSM were recruited through venuebased, time-space sampling. Prevalence ratios comparing 2011 to 2008 were estimated using linearmixed models. Early linkage was defined as an HIV clinic visit within 3 months of diagnosis. ARV treatment was defined as use at interview. Prevalence of early linkage to care was 79%(187/236) in 2008 and 83%(241/291) in 2011. Inmultivariable analysis, prevalence of early linkage did not differ significantly between years overall (P = 0.44). Prevalence of ARV treatment was 69% (790/1,142) in 2008 and 79%(1,049/1,336) in 2001. In multivariable analysis, ARV treatment increased overall (P = 0.0003) and among most sub-groups. Black MSM were less likely than white MSM to report ARV treatment (P = 0.01).While early linkage to care did not increase significantly between 2008 and 2011, ARV treatment increased among most sub-groups. Progress is being made in getting MSM on HIV treatment, but more efforts are needed to decrease disparities in ARV coverage.


Paz-Bailey G.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Mendoza M.C.B.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Finlayson T.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Wejnert C.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | And 86 more authors.
AIDS | Year: 2016

Objective: Evaluate changes in condomless anal sex at last sex among men who have sex with men (MSM) and assess if these changes are associated with the adoption of serosorting and biomedical prevention. Design: The National HIV Behavioral Surveillance is a crosssectional survey done in up to 21 cities in 2005, 2008, 2011 and 2014. Methods: MSM were recruited through venue-based sampling. Among men reporting at least one male partner, we evaluated changes in condomless anal sex at last sex with a partner with (1) HIV-concordant (proxy for serosorting) or (2) HIV-discordant (discordant/unknown) status. We hypothesized that if concordant condomless sex was increasing while discordant was stable/declining, the increases could be driven by more men attempting to serosort. We used generalized estimating equations assuming a Poisson distribution and robust variance estimator to explore whether temporal changes in the outcomes varied by selected characteristics. We also assessed changes in condomless anal sex by antiretroviral therapy (ART) use among HIV-positive MSM. Results: Among 5371 HIV-positive MSM, there were increases in concordant (19% in 2005 to 25% in 2014, P<0.001) and discordant condomless sex (15 to 19%, P<0.001). The increases were not different by ART use. Among 30547 HIV-negative MSM, concordant (21 to 27%, P<0.001) and discordant condomless sex (8 to 13%, P<0.001) increased. Conclusion: Our data suggest that condom use decreased among MSM and that the trends are not explained by serosorting or ART. Promotion of condoms and increased access to preexposure prophylaxis are vital to ensure that the benefits of ART in reducing transmission of HIV are not undermined. Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Linton S.L.,Emory University | Cooper H.L.F.,Emory University | Kelley M.E.,Emory University | Karnes C.C.,Emory University | And 71 more authors.
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2015

Objectives. We explored how variance in HIV infection is distributed across multiple geographical scales among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the United States, overall and within racial/ethnic groups. Methods. People who inject drugs (n = 9077) were recruited via respondent driven sampling from 19 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system. We used multilevel modeling to determine the percentage of variance in HIV infection explained by zip codes, counties, and MSAs where PWID lived, overall and for specific racial/ethnic groups. Results. Collectively, zip codes, counties, and MSAs explained 29% of variance in HIV infection.Within specific racial/ethnic groups, all 3 scales explained variance in HIV infection among non-Hispanic/Latino White PWID (4.3%, 0.2%, and 7.5%, respectively), MSAs explained variance among Hispanic/Latino PWID (10.1%), and counties explained variance among non-Hispanic/Latino Black PWID (6.9%). Conclusions. Exposure to potential determinants of HIV infection at zip codes, counties, and MSAs may vary for different racial/ethnic groups of PWID, and may reveal opportunities to identify and ameliorate intraracial inequities in exposure to determinants of HIV infection at these geographical scales.


Meites E.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Markowitz L.E.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Paz-Bailey G.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Oster A.M.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | And 54 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2014

Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for disease associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). In late 2011, HPV vaccine was recommended for males through age 21 and MSM through age 26. Using data from the 2011 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, we assessed self-reported HPV vaccine uptake among MSM, using multivariate analysis to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Among 3221 MSM aged 18-26, 157 (4.9%) reported ≥1 vaccine dose. Uptake was higher among men who visited a healthcare provider (aPR 2.3, CI: 1.2-4.2), disclosed same-sex sexual attraction/behavior to a provider (aPR 2.1, CI: 1.3-3.3), reported a positive HIV test (aPR 2.2, CI: 1.5-3.2), or received hepatitis vaccine (aPR 3.9, CI: 2.4-6.4). Of 3064 unvaccinated MSM, 2326 (75.9%) had visited a healthcare provider within 1 year. These national data on HPV vaccine uptake among MSM provide a baseline as vaccination recommendations are implemented. © 2014.

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