Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR

São Paulo, Brazil

Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR

São Paulo, Brazil
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Nakamura F.Y.,Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR | Nakamura F.Y.,State University Londrina | Pereira L.A.,Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR | Cal Abad C.C.,Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Human Kinetics | Year: 2017

Heart rate variability has been widely used to monitor athletes' cardiac autonomic control changes induced by training and competition, and recently shorter recording times have been sought to improve its practicality. The aim of this study was to test the agreement between the (ultra-short-term) natural log of the root-mean-square difference of successive normal RR intervals (lnRMSSD - measured in only 1 min post-1 min stabilization) and the criterion lnRMSSD (measured in the last 5 min out of 10 min of recording) in young female basketball players. Furthermore, the correlation between training induced delta change in the ultra-short-term lnRMSSD and the criterion lnRMSSD was calculated. Seventeen players were assessed at rest pre- and post-eight weeks of training. Trivial effect sizes (-0.03 in the pre- and 0.10 in the post- treatment) were found in the comparison between the ultra-short-term lnRMSSD (3.29 ± 0.45 and 3.49 ± 0.35 ms, in the pre- and post-, respectively) and the criterion lnRMSSD (3.30 ± 0.40 and 3.45 ± 0.41 ms, in the pre- and post-, respectively) (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.95 and 0.93). In both cases, the response to training was significant, with Pearson's correlation of 0.82 between the delta changes of the ultra-short-term lnRMSSD and the criterion lnRMSSD. In conclusion, the lnRMSSD can be calculated within only 2 min of data acquisition (the 1st min discarded) in young female basketball players, with the ultra-short-term measure presenting similar sensitivity to training effects as the standard criterion measure. © 2017 Editorial Committee of Journal of Human Kinetics 2017.


Rosas F.,Rosas of Buenos Aires Sport Club | Ramirez-Campillo R.,University of Los Lagos | Ramirez-Campillo R.,Laboratory of Exercise science | Martinez C.,University of the Frontier | And 13 more authors.
Journal of Human Kinetics | Year: 2017

Plyometric training and beta-alanine supplementation are common among soccer players, although its combined use had never been tested. Therefore, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to compare the effects of a plyometric training program, with or without beta-alanine supplementation, on maximal-intensity and endurance performance in female soccer players during an in-season training period. Athletes (23.7 ± 2.4 years) were assigned to either a plyometric training group receiving a placebo (PLACEBO, n = 8), a plyometric training group receiving beta-alanine supplementation (BA, n = 8), or a control group receiving placebo without following a plyometric training program (CONTROL, n = 9). Athletes were evaluated for single and repeated jumps and sprints, endurance, and change-of-direction speed performance before and after the intervention. Both plyometric training groups improved in explosive jumping (ES = 0.27 to 1.0), sprinting (ES = 0.31 to 0.78), repeated sprinting (ES = 0.39 to 0.91), 60 s repeated jumping (ES = 0.32 to 0.45), endurance (ES = 0.35 to 0.37), and change-of-direction speed performance (ES = 0.36 to 0.58), whereas no significant changes were observed for the CONTROL group. Nevertheless, compared to the CONTROL group, only the BA group showed greater improvements in endurance, repeated sprinting and repeated jumping performances. It was concluded that beta-alanine supplementation during plyometric training may add further adaptive changes related to endurance, repeated sprinting and jumping ability. © 2017 Editorial Committee of Journal of Human Kinetics.


Gallardo-Fuentes F.,University of Los Lagos | Gallardo-Fuentes J.,University of Los Lagos | Ramirez-Campillo R.,University of Los Lagos | Balsalobre-Fernandez C.,Autonomous University of Madrid | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2016

The purpose of this study was to analyze the concurrent validity and reliability of the iPhone app named My Jump for measuring jump height in 40-cm drop jumps (DJs), countermovement jumps (CMJs), and squat jumps (SJs). To do this, 21 male and female athletes (age, 22.1 ± 3.6 years) completed 5 maximal DJs, CMJs, and SJs on 2 separate days, which were evaluated using a contact platform and the app My Jump, developed to calculate jump height from flight time using the high-speed video recording facility on the iPhone. A total of 630 jumps were compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plots, Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient (r), Cronbach's alpha (α), and coefficient of variation (CV). There was almost perfect agreement between the measurement instruments for all jump height values (ICC 0.97-0.99), with no differences between the instruments (p > 0.05; mean difference of 0.2 cm). Almost perfect correlation was observed between the measurement instruments for SJs, CMJs, and DJs (r 0.96-0.99). My Jump showed very good within-subject reliability (α 0.94-0.99; CV 3.8-7.6) and interday reliability (r 0.86-0.95) for SJs, CMJs, and DJs in all subjects. Therefore, the iPhone app named My Jump provides reliable intersession and intrasession data, as well as valid measurements for maximal jump height during fast (i.e., DJs) and slow (i.e., CMJs) stretch-shortening cycle muscle actions, and during concentric-only explosive muscle actions (i.e., SJs), in both male and female athletes in comparison with a professional contact platform. © 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association.


Nakamura F.Y.,Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR | Nakamura F.Y.,State University Londrina | Flatt A.A.,University of Alabama | Pereira L.A.,Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to test the possibility of the ultra-short-term lnRMSSD (measured in 1-min post-1-min stabiliza-tion period) to detect training induced adaptations in futsal players. Twenty-four elite futsal players underwent HRV as-sessments pre- and post-three or four weeks preseason training. From the 10-min HRV recording period, lnRMSSD was ana-lyzed in the following time segments: 1) from 0-5 min (i.e., stabilization period); 2) from 0-1 min; 1-2 min; 2-3 min; 3-4 min; 4-5 min and; 3) from 5-10 min (i.e., criterion period). The lnRMSSD was almost certainly higher (100/00/00) using the magnitude-based inference in all periods at the post- moment. The correlation between changes in ultra-short-term lnRMSSD (i.e., 0-1 min; 1-2 min; 2-3 min; 3-4 min; 4-5 min) and lnRMSSDCriterion ranged between 0.45 - 0.75, with the highest value (p = 0.75; 90% CI: 0.55 – 0.85) found between ultra-short-term lnRMDSSD at 1-2 min and lnRMSSDCriterion. In conclu-sion, lnRMSSD determined in a short period of 1-min is sensi-tive to training induced changes in futsal players (based on the very large correlation to the criterion measure), and can be used to track cardiac autonomic adaptations. © Journal of Sports Science and Medicine.


PubMed | University of Los Lagos, University of Alabama, Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR and State University Londrina
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of sports science & medicine | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to test the possibility of the ultra-short-term lnRMSSD (measured in 1-min post-1-min stabilization period) to detect training induced adaptations in futsal players. Twenty-four elite futsal players underwent HRV assessments pre- and post-three or four weeks preseason training. From the 10-min HRV recording period, lnRMSSD was analyzed in the following time segments: 1) from 0-5 min (i.e., stabilization period); 2) from 0-1 min; 1-2 min; 2-3 min; 3-4 min; 4-5 min and; 3) from 5-10 min (i.e., criterion period). The lnRMSSD was almost certainly higher (100/00/00) using the magnitude-based inference in all periods at the post- moment. The correlation between changes in ultra-short-term lnRMSSD (i.e., 0-1 min; 1-2 min; 2-3 min; 3-4 min; 4-5 min) and lnRMSSDCriterion ranged between 0.45-0.75, with the highest value (p = 0.75; 90% CI: 0.55 - 0.85) found between ultra-short-term lnRMDSSD at 1-2 min and lnRMSSDCriterion. In conclusion, lnRMSSD determined in a short period of 1-min is sensitive to training induced changes in futsal players (based on the very large correlation to the criterion measure), and can be used to track cardiac autonomic adaptations. Key pointsThe ultra-short-term (1 min) natural log of the root-mean-square difference of successive normal RR intervals (lnRMSSD) is sensitive to training effects in futsal playersThe ultra-short-term lnRMSSD may simplify the assessment of the cardiac autonomic changes in the field compared to the traditional and lengthier (10 min duration) analysisCoaches are encouraged to implement the ultra-short-term heart rate variability in their routines to monitor team sports athletes.


PubMed | Nucleus of High Performance in Sport NAR
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to compare performance in the Yo-Yo IR1, 20-meter sprint, COD test, loaded and unloaded lower-limb muscle power tests (squat jump [SJ], countermovement jump [CMJ] and jump squat [JS] tests), as well as resting and exercise heart rate variability parameters in high-level senior professional and under-20 (U-20) futsal players.All the players (18 senior and 15 U-20 male players) performed the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1), 20-m sprint, COD test, loaded and unloaded lower-limb power tests (SJ, CMJ and JS tests), as well as resting and post-exercise log-transformed root-mean-square difference of successive normal RR intervals (lnRMSSD) recording. The t-test for independent samples and magnitude-based inference were used to compare the groups.Seniors were likely to very likely superior than U-20 in the Yo-Yo IR1 (1506.7287.1 and 1264.0397.9 m, P<0.05), and resting (3.430.32 and 3.210.37 ms) and post-exercise lnRMSSD (2.950.39 and 2.480.59 ms, P<0.05). Conversely, U-20 players performed very likely to almost certainly better than seniors in the relative mean propulsive power (10.391.60 and 9.051.57 W/kg, P<0.05), 20-m sprint time (2.920.10 and 3.050.10 s, P<0.05) and COD (5.500.15 and 5.710.22 s, P<0.05).Findings from this cross-sectional study indicate that long-term exposure to futsal may lead to improvement in the aerobic fitness and cardiac autonomic regulation, while impairing the muscle power and speed performance of players. Future longitudinal studies are necessary to confirm the occurrence of such concurrent training adaptations.

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