Singapore, Singapore
Singapore, Singapore

Nanyang Technological University is a young, research-intensive university in Singapore. It is one of the largest public universities in Singapore.NTU was inaugurated in 1991, originally as an English-medium technical and teaching college occupying the grounds of the former Nanyang University, a Chinese-medium university which had been consolidated into the National University of Singapore in 1980. Over the years, NTU has grown to become a full-fledged research university, and currently provides a high-quality global education to close to 33,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students. The student body includes top scholars and international olympiad medallists from the region and beyond. Hailing from more than 70 countries, the university's 4000-strong teaching and research staff also bring dynamic international perspectives and years of solid industry experience.In recent years, various college and university rankings have placed NTU amongst the top universities in Asia and beyond. In the 2014 QS World University Rankings, NTU is ranked 39th globally , and is placed 1st in the world among young universities according to the 2014 QS Top 50 Under 50. NTU's College of Engineering is also ranked 9th in the world according to the latest 2014 QS World University Rankings by Faculty. In the 2014 Times Higher Education World University Rankings, NTU is ranked at 61st globally . NTU's business school, Nanyang Business School, was rated 64th in the world by the Economist Intelligence Unit in 2013. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Singapore Health Services Pte Ltd and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2016-08-03

A method of producing an artificial neural network capable of predicting the survivability of a patient, including: storing in an electronic database patient health data comprising a plurality of sets of data, each set having at least one of a first parameter relating to heart rate variability data and a second parameter relating to vital sign data, each set further having a third parameter relating to patient survivability; providing a network of nodes interconnected to form an artificial neural network, the nodes comprising a plurality of artificial neurons, each artificial neuron having at least one input with an associated weight; and training the artificial neural network using the patient health data such that the associated weight of the at least one input of each artificial neuron is adjusted in response to respective first, second and third parameters of different sets of data from the patient health data.


Patent
Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2015-03-10

Provided is a spectrally selective solar thermal coating, formed as a continuous uniform layer, combining a light-absorbing coating and an infrared (IR) reflecting layer positioned on top of the absorber coating. The coating is adapted for use in a plurality of applications, including amongst many control of stray light and absorptivity in thermosolar devices.


There is provided a compound of formula I, having the structure: wherein R^(1 )to R^(5 )have the meanings given in the description.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2015-03-24

The present invention is directed to enzymes having Asx-specific ligase and cyclase activity and to nucleic acids encoding those as well as methods of the manufacture of said enzymes. Further encompassed are methods and uses of these enzymes.


Patent
The Regents Of The University Of California and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2016-09-06

A system and method for incorporating partially coherent illumination models into the problem of phase and amplitude retrieval from a stack of intensity images. The recovery of phase could be realized by many methods, including Kalman filters or other nonlinear optimization algorithms that provide least squares error between the measurement and estimation.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2015-04-02

A dead time circuit (750) for a switching circuit is disclosed. The dead-time circuit comprises: an input (752) for receiving a switching signal of the switching circuit with at least one supply rail having a ground bounce signal; first and second outputs (754a, 754b); a first feedforward path (756) coupled to the first output and arranged to receive the switching signal; a second feedforward path (758) coupled to the second output and arranged to receive the switching signal; a first feedback path (760) forming a first feedback loop between the first output and the second feedforward path; and a second feedback path (762) forming a second feedback loop between the second output and the first feedforward path; wherein each of the first and second feedforward paths includes a respective first and second delay circuit (764a, 764b), each having a time delay greater than a predetermined time period of the ground bounce signal. A switching amplifier is also disclosed.


Tan J.P.L.,Nanyang Technological University
Physical Review E - Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics | Year: 2017

Nonparametric detrending or noise reduction methods are often employed to separate trends from noisy time series when no satisfactory models exist to fit the data. However, conventional noise reduction methods depend on subjective choices of smoothing parameters. Here we present a simple multivariate noise reduction method based on available nonlinear forecasting techniques. These are in turn based on state-space reconstruction for which a strong theoretical justification exists for their use in nonparametric forecasting. The noise reduction method presented here is conceptually similar to Schreiber's noise reduction method using state-space reconstruction. However, we show that Schreiber's method has a minor flaw that can be overcome with forecasting. Furthermore, our method contains a simple but nontrivial extension to multivariate time series. We apply the method to multivariate time series generated from the Van der Pol oscillator, the Lorenz equations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model of neuronal spiking activity, and to two other univariate real-world data sets. It is demonstrated that noise reduction heuristics can be objectively optimized with in-sample forecasting errors that correlate well with actual noise reduction errors. © 2017 American Physical Society.


Ukil A.,Nanyang Technological University
IEEE Region 10 Annual International Conference, Proceedings/TENCON | Year: 2017

Transmitting bulk amount of electrical power over long distance is one of the primary aims of the power system. High-voltage alternating current (HVAC) power transmission is the standard way, while high-voltage direct current (HVDC) based system is increasingly becoming important. HVDC is particularly important for renewable energy integration, large-scale interconnection of distributed sources, over long distances, reducing transmission losses. Transmission line length which impacts the line parameters is an important factor. In this paper, a concept of tuned HVAC line is presented, where the voltages and the currents at the receiving and the sending-ends become numerically equal. This can be very effective in reducing the reactive power losses. Thus, the transmission frequency would be adaptively varied based on the line length. Static frequency converter would be one of the most important parts for the tuned HVAC line. The design and implementation issues are presented in details. Critical factors like loss, skin effect, power transfer, existing line usage, protection issues are comparatively discussed for the tuned HVAC and the HVDC systems. © 2016 IEEE.


Abeysekera S.S.,Nanyang Technological University
IEEE Region 10 Annual International Conference, Proceedings/TENCON | Year: 2017

A method for accurate signal parameter estimation from a complex sinusoid-pair is described. The method uses spectral decorrelation to avoid bias resulting from the presence of multiple sinusoids. A hybrid estimation method that reaches optimum bounds for any data length in the presence of both low and high noise power is also shown. The method is useful in power system applications. © 2016 IEEE.


Abeysekera S.S.,Nanyang Technological University
IEEE Region 10 Annual International Conference, Proceedings/TENCON | Year: 2017

A model for Photoplethysmographic signal description through a Fourier representation with a fundamental and 2 harmonic components is discussed. Accurate method for parameter estimation using the model is also presented. The estimated parameters enable to determine physiologically meaningful features that can be related to heart rate variability, blood pressure variations, etc. Proposed method allows signal feature extraction in a uniformly sampled manner avoiding complicated signal interpolations. © 2016 IEEE.


Zhou Y.,Nanyang Technological University
Journal of Therapeutic Ultrasound | Year: 2015

Microbubbles have been used widely both in the ultrasonic diagnosis to enhance the contrast of vasculature and in ultrasound therapy to increase the bioeffects induced by bubble cavitation. However, due to their large size, the lifetime of microbubbles in the circulation system is on the order of minutes, and they cannot penetrate through the endothelial gap to enter the tumor. In an acoustic field, liquefied gas nanoparticles may be able to change the state and become the gas form in a few cycles of exposure without significant heating effects. Such a phenomenon is called as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). This review is intended to introduce the emerging application of ADV. The physics and the theoretical model behind it are introduced for further understanding of the mechanisms. Current manufacturing approaches are provided, and their differences are compared. Based on the characteristic of phase shift, a variety of therapeutic applications have been carried out both in vitro and in vivo. The latest progress and interesting results of vessel occlusion, thermal ablation using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), localized drug delivery to the tumor and cerebral tissue through the blood-brain barrier, localized tissue erosion by histotripsy are summarized. ADV may be able to overcome some limitations of microbubble-mediated ultrasound therapy and provide a novel drug and molecular targeting carrier. More investigation will help progress this technology forward for clinical translation. © 2015 Zhou.


Abeysekera S.S.,Nanyang Technological University
International Conference on Digital Signal Processing, DSP | Year: 2017

Computationally efficient methods for accurate, bias free DOA estimation from a source signal impinging on a sparse array are presented. In particular, the presence of I/Q mismatch and D.C. offsets are discussed. Since the methods meet Cramer-Rao bounds and able to cope array imperfections such as nonuniform gains, element failure, they are useful in short sparse array implementations with simplified processing hardware. © 2016 IEEE.


Chew S.C.,Nanyang Technological University | Yang L.,Nanyang Technological University
Trends in Microbiology | Year: 2017

The phenotypic diversity in biofilms allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Stochastic gene expression and structural differentiation are believed to confer phenotypic diversity. However, two recent publications demonstrate how hydrodynamic flow and substrate topography can also alter the competitive outcomes of different bacterial phenotypes, increasing biofilm phenotypic variation. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.


Qiu J.,Nanyang Technological University | Yang E.-H.,Nanyang Technological University
Cement and Concrete Research | Year: 2017

This paper reports fatigue deterioration of engineered cementitious composite (ECC), a unique high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete featuring high ductility. Sources of fatigue dependency in ECC microscopic constituent properties were discovered experimentally. These fatigue-dependent fiber and fiber/matrix interface properties were incorporated into a novel multi-scale mechanics-based analytical model to reveal the influences of fatigue dependency on the fiber-bridging and fatigue crack propagation in ECC. The flexural stress-fatigue life (S-N) of ECC were predicted and compared with experimental results. It was found that several fatigue-induced changes of microscopic constituent properties contribute to the fatigue deterioration of fiber bridging of ECC. As a result, saturation of multiple cracks (and thus strain capacity) of ECC was much reduced under fatigue. The flexural fatigue model incorporating the fatigue-dependent fiber-bridging constitutive model developed in this study could be used to predict the flexural stress-fatigue life of ECC and the resulting S-N curve agreed well with experimental results. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Lyu Y.,Nanyang Technological University | Zhen X.,Nanyang Technological University | Miao Y.,Nanyang Technological University | Pu K.,Nanyang Technological University
ACS Nano | Year: 2017

Protein sulfenic acids play a key role in oxidative signal transduction of many biological and pathological processes; however, current chemical tools rely on visible fluorescence signals, limiting their utility to in vitro assays. We herein report reaction-based semiconducting polymer nanoprobes (rSPNs) with near-infrared absorption for in vivo photoacoustic (PA) imaging of protein sulfenic acids. rSPNs comprise an optically active semiconducting polymer as the core shielded with inert silica and poly(ethylene glycol) corona. The sulfenic acid reactive group (1,3-cyclohexanedione) is efficiently conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles via click chemistry. Such a nanostructure enables the specific recognition reaction between rSPNs and protein sulfenic acids without compromising the fluorescence and PA properties. In addition to in vitro tracking of the production of protein sulfenic acids in cancer cells under oxidative stress, rSPNs permit real-time PA and fluorescence imaging of protein sulfenic acids in tumors of living mice. This study thus not only demonstrates the first reaction-based PA probes with submolecular level recognition ability but also highlights the opportunities provided by hybrid nanoparticles for advanced molecular imaging. © 2016 American Chemical Society.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Large-scale timber architecture is increasingly popular lately, and with projects like The Wave, a new sports hall in Singapore's Nanyang Technological University (NTU), it's easy to see why. Attractive, sustainable, and impressively efficient, the building is yet another reminder of how engineered wood is revolutionizing sustainable construction. Presumably deriving its name from the shape of its sculpted roof, The Wave is the first mass engineered timber (aka mass timber) building in Southeast Asia, according to NTU. Put simply, mass timber refers to a range of wood products (including CLT and glulam) that consist of multiple layers of wood laminated into dense prefabricated panels. The panels allow buildings to be assembled quickly and can actually have a stronger weight-to-strength ratio and perform better in a fire than reinforced concrete. For a deeper dive, read our story on timber skyscrapers. In The Wave's case, using mass timber sped construction time up and saved an estimated 25 percent in manpower, compared to conventional methods. It also meant that the large 72 m (236 ft)-long roof can be easily supported without any internal columns. Instead, external columns support the roof's seven long-span timber arches, which weigh over 440 tonnes (more than 490 US tons). Computer modeling of on-site sun and wind patterns was used to ensure optimal natural ventilation inside the sports hall. "Each external wall has two layers with a pocket of air between them that insulates the heat on hot days," explains a press release. "The walls have special metal coils installed with chilled water flowing through them. This cools the wind that enters the hall allowing warmer air to escape through convection." This cooling, combined with mass timber's excellent insulation, means that users of the Wave's basketball courts and badminton courts can play comfortably without needing ceiling fans or air-con. The sports hall also includes 980 mechanized retractable seats, energy-saving LED lighting, and solar power. The Wave isn't NTU's only notable example of stunning green architecture, as Heatherwick Studio's Learning Hub was also completed there just a couple of years ago.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

Singapore researchers are working on a system of air lanes to keep drones on a safe path. The sky's the limit for the number of drones expected to hit Singapore's airspace in the next 10 years. But the heavy traffic will present some real dangers. To prevent crashes, experts at Nanyang Technological University and the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore are working on a system of air lanes to keep drones on a safe path.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

SINGAPORE, April 27, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- As Guangzhou prepares to host the 2017 Fortune Global Forum later this year, key representatives from the municipal government hosted a roadshow in Singapore to discuss openness, innovation and collaboration between the two commercial hubs. At the roadshow, two Letters of Intent (LOI) were signed between Sino-Singapore International Joint Research Institute and Chinese Academy of Sciences Holdings Co., Ltd; and between Guangzhou Gas Group, Guangzhou Port Group and Royal Golden Eagle, outlining agreements on the Sino-Singapore collaboration on technology and intellectual property rights. "Guangzhou and Singapore share many similarities, including city scale, cultural background and languages - in fact Singapore even hosted the first Fortune Global Forum years ago in 1995,"  Cai Chaolin, Guangzhou Vice Mayor, said. "What's more, our forward-thinking outlook and cooperation through the years have enabled us to pursue meaningful projects together that enrich our economies. What lies ahead is exciting, and we look forward to more collaborations." Today Guangzhou is among the most important business centers in China and a gateway to the outside world. The economically dynamic region is built on a centuries-old foundation of innovation and wisdom, and continues to thrive on openness and modernization. In the last five years, Guangzhou's gross domestic product (GDP) saw an average increase of 10.1 percent, with the local service industry's growth approaching that of developed economies, representing 66.77 percent of the total GDP in 2016. Guangzhou has continued to increase its investment in advancing technologies and talent, and to improve the convenience, effectiveness and efficiency of trade facilitation and services. As a result, the relationship with, and opportunities for, Singapore in the region have been further expanded. In recent years, Guangzhou has introduced a series of policies to encourage even more innovation in the region, and is providing on-going support for enterprises, start-ups and talent. Guangzhou also continues to further optimize the local business environment and reduce the burden on foreign enterprises through governmental self-reforms, including the streamlining of administrative examinations and approval permissions. To develop a more business-friendly environment, Guangzhou has reduced administrative fees, set up government funds, implemented policies to lower insurance rates, and it continues to provide incentives for foreign corporations During his visit to Singapore, Guangzhou Vice Mayor, Cai Chaolin, met key leaders and representatives in the region to discuss the next chapter for Guangzhou and Singapore, including open perspectives, innovative approaches, and jointly building an international innovative hub for technology. He was joined by representatives from the Guangzhou government, the Chinese Embassy in Singapore, International Enterprise (IE) Singapore, A*STAR, the Intellectual Property Office of Singapore, the Nanyang Technological University, the Urban Renewal Authority, executives from the Fortune Global Forum, the Chairman of Ascendas-Singbridge, Mr. Wong Kan Seng, and corporate representatives across different industries. "With more than 2,230 years of history, we are surely an ancient city," said Vice Mayor Cai. "But today, all eyes are on the future and what tremendous things are still to come for the region."


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.theengineer.co.uk

Engineers have led a team in the development of nanowires that record the electrical activity of neurons, an advance that could lead to a greater understanding of the brain. The new nanowire technology could eventually act as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and help researchers better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks. “We’re developing tools that will allow us to dig deeper into the science of how the brain works,” said lead investigator Shadi Dayeh, an electrical engineering professor at the University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. “We envision that this nanowire technology could be used on stem-cell-derived brain models to identify the most effective drugs for neurological diseases,” said Anne Bang, director of cell biology at the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics at the Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute. According to UC San Diego, researchers can uncover details about a neuron’s health, activity and response to drugs by measuring ion channel currents and changes in its intracellular potential, which is due to the difference in ion concentration between the inside and outside of the cell. The measurement technique is sensitive to small potential changes and provides readings with high signal-to-noise ratios. However, this method can break the cell membrane and destroy the cell. It is also limited to analysing one cell at a time, making it impractical for studying large networks of neurons, which are how they are naturally arranged in the body. “Existing high sensitivity measurement techniques are not scalable to 2D and 3D tissue-like structures cultured in vitro,” Dayeh said. “The development of a nanoscale technology that can measure rapid and minute potential changes in neuronal cellular networks could accelerate drug development for diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems.” The nanowire technology developed in Dayeh’s laboratory is non-destructive and can simultaneously measure potential changes in multiple neurons with the high sensitivity and resolution achieved by the current state of the art. The device is said to consist of an array of silicon nanowires densely packed on a chip patterned with nickel electrode leads that are coated with silica. The nanowires poke inside cells without damaging them and are sensitive enough to measure small potential changes that are a fraction of or a few millivolts in magnitude. Researchers used the nanowires to record the electrical activity of neurons that were isolated from mice and derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. These neurons survived and continued functioning for at least six weeks while interfaced with the nanowire array in vitro. Another innovative feature of this technology is it can isolate the electrical signal measured by each individual nanowire. “This is unusual in existing nanowire technologies, where several wires are electrically shorted together and you cannot differentiate the signal from every single wire,” Dayeh said. To overcome this hurdle, researchers invented a new wafer bonding approach to fuse the silicon nanowires to the nickel electrodes. Their approach involved silicidation, which is a reaction that binds two solids – silicon and another metal – together without melting either material. This process prevents the nickel electrodes from liquidising, spreading out and shorting adjacent electrode leads. Silicidation is usually used to make contacts to transistors, but this is the first time it is being used to do patterned wafer bonding, Dayeh said. “And since this process is used in semiconductor device fabrication, we can integrate versions of these nanowires with CMOS electronics.” Dayeh’s laboratory holds several pending patent applications for this technology. Dayeh noted that the technology needs further optimisation for brain-on-chip drug screening. His team is working to extend the application of the technology to heart-on-chip drug screening for cardiac diseases and in vivo brain mapping, which is still several years away. “Our ultimate goal is to translate this technology to a device that can be implanted in the brain.” The project was a collaborative effort between the Dayeh and Bang labs, neurobiologists at UC San Diego, and researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and Sandia National Laboratories. The researchers have published their work – High Density Individually Addressable Nanowire Arrays Record Activity from Primary Rodent and Human Stem Cell Derived Neurons – in Nano Letters.


Researchers investigating a form of adult-onset diabetes that shares features with the two better-known types of diabetes have discovered genetic influences that may offer clues to more accurate diagnosis and treatment. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is informally called "type 1.5 diabetes" because like type 1 diabetes (T1D), LADA is marked by circulating autoantibodies, an indicator that an overactive immune system is damaging the body's insulin-producing beta cells. But LADA also shares clinical features with type 2 diabetes (T2D), which tends to appear in adulthood. Also, as in T2D, LADA patients do not require insulin treatments when first diagnosed. A study published April 25 in BMC Medicine uses genetic analysis to show that LADA is closer to T1D than to T2D. "Correctly diagnosing subtypes of diabetes is important, because it affects how physicians manage a patient's disease," said co-study leader Struan F.A. Grant, PhD, a genomics researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). "If patients are misdiagnosed with the wrong type of diabetes, they may not receive the most effective medication." Grant collaborated with European scientists, led by Richard David Leslie of the University of London, U.K.; and Bernhard O. Boehm, of Ulm University Medical Center, Germany and the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, a joint medical school of Imperial College London and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Occurring when patients cannot produce their own insulin or are unable to properly process the insulin they do produce, diabetes is usually classified into two major types. T1D, formerly called juvenile diabetes, generally presents in childhood, but may also appear first in adults. T2D, formerly called non-insulin-dependent diabetes, typically appears in adults, but has been increasing over the past several decades in children and teens. Some 90 percent or more of all patients with diabetes are diagnosed with T2D. Grant and many other researchers have discovered dozens of genetic regions that increase diabetes risk, usually with different sets of variants associated with T1D compared to T2D. The current study, the largest-ever genetic study of LADA, sought to determine how established T1D- or T2D-associated variants operate in the context of LADA. The study team compared DNA from 978 LADA patients, all adults from the U.K. and Germany, to a control group of 1,057 children without diabetes. Another set of control samples came from 2,820 healthy adults in the U.K. All samples were from individuals of European ancestry. The researchers calculated genetic risk scores to measure whether LADA patients had genetic profiles more similar to those of T1D or T2D patients. They found several T1D genetic regions associated with LADA, while relatively few T2D gene regions added to the risk of LADA. The genetic risk in LADA from T1D risk alleles was lower than in childhood-onset T1D, possibly accounting for the fact that LADA appears later in life. One variant, located in TCF7L2, which Grant and colleagues showed in 2006 to be among the strongest genetic risk factors for T2D reported to date, had no role in LADA. "Our finding that LADA is genetically closer to T1D than to T2D suggests that some proportion of patients diagnosed as adults with type 2 diabetes may actually have late-onset type 1 diabetes," said Grant. Grant said that larger studies are needed to further uncover genetic influences in the complex biology of diabetes, adding, "As we continue to integrate genetic findings with clinical characteristics, we may be able to more accurately classify diabetes subtypes to match patients with more effective treatments." Grant received support for this research from the National Institutes of Health (grant R01 DK085212) and the Daniel B. Burke Endowed Chair for Diabetes Research. "Relative Contribution of type 1 and type 2 diabetes loci to the genetic etiology of adult-onset, non-insulin-requiring autoimmune diabetes" BMC Medicine, published online April 25, 2017. http://doi. About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 546-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.spie.org

A novel fabrication procedure is used to produce flexible devices that include inorganic semiconductor nanowires and that can compete with organic devices in terms of brightness. Nitride LEDs are coming to replace other light sources in almost all general lighting, as well as in displays and life-science applications. Inorganic semiconductor devices, however, are naturally mechanically rigid and cannot be used in applications that require mechanical flexibility. Flexible LEDs are therefore currently a topic of intense research, as they are desirable for use in many applications, including rollable displays, wearable intelligent optoelectronics, bendable or implantable light sources, and biomedical devices. At present, flexible devices are mainly fabricated from organic materials. For example, organic LEDs (OLEDs) are already being used commercially in curved TV and smartphone screens. However, OLEDs have worse temporal stability and lower luminescence (especially in the blue spectral range) than nitride semiconductor LEDs. Substantial research efforts are thus being made to fabricate flexible inorganic LEDs.1 The conventional approach for flexible inorganic LED fabrication consists of number of steps, i.e., layer lift-off, microstructuring, and transfer to plastic supports. To avoid the microstructuring step and facilitate the lift-off, it is advantageous to shrink the active element dimensions and to use bottom-up nanostructures (such as nanowires, NWs) rather than 2D films. These NWs—i.e., elongated nanocrystals with a submicrometer diameter—have remarkable mechanical and optoelectronic properties that stem from their anisotropic geometry, high surface-to-volume ratio, and perfect crystallinity. In addition, such NWs are mechanically flexible and can withstand high levels of deformation without suffering plastic relaxation. Efficient LEDs that include nitride NWs have previously been demonstrated, and in our work,2 we make use of nitride NWs as the active material for flexible LEDs. Our polymer-embedded NWs offer an elegant solution to create flexible optoelectronic devices in which we combine the high efficiency and long lifetimes of inorganic semiconductor materials with the high flexibility of polymers. In our devices, the NW arrays—which are embedded in a flexible film and can be lifted-off from their native substrate—can sustain large deformations because of the high flexibility of the individual NWs. Furthermore, the footprints of individual NWs are much smaller than the typical curvature radius of LEDs (i.e., on the order of a few millimeters or more). In our approach, we used catalyst-free metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) to grow self-assembled gallium nitride (GaN) NWs on c-plane sapphire substrates.3 These NWs (with lengths of about 20μm and radii of about 0.5–1.5μm) have core/shell n–p junctions into which we incorporate multiple radial indium gallium nitride (InGaN)/GaN quantum wells. We control the emission color by changing the indium concentration of the InGaN emitting layer. In our actual device fabrication process4—see Figure 1(a)—the NW array is embedded into the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), peeled-off from the sapphire host substrate, and we then flip the composite NW/polymer membrane onto an arbitrary substrate to conduct the metal back-contacting. We subsequently flip the layer again and mount it on a flexible substrate (a metal foil or plastic), at which point we front-contact it with a flexible and transparent electrode. For the front contact we chose a silver NW mesh—see Figure 1(b)—which is characterized by mechanical flexibility, good electrical conductivity, and optical transparency. Figure 1. (a) Schematic illustration of the fabrication process for flexible LEDs that are based on a vertical nitride nanowire (NW) array. Ni: Nickel. Au: Gold. Ti: Titanium. (b) Scanning electron microscope image of the spin-coated silver (Ag) NW network on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/NW membrane. This silver NW network is used to form the transparent top-contact of the device. The protruding LED NWs are circled in red. We have used this technological procedure to fabricate blue and green flexible NW LEDs.4 We find that our devices exhibit typical behavior for nitride NW LEDs, i.e., with a light-up voltage of about 3V. Moreover, our LEDs can be bent to a curvature radius of ±3mm without any degradation of their electrical or luminescent properties. Photographs of our NW LEDs under operation in flat conditions, and during upward or inward bending are shown in Figure 2. Our flexible NW LEDs also have reasonable stability over time, unlike conventional OLEDs. Indeed, storing our devices in ambient conditions for several months does not cause their properties to degrade, whereas the lifetime of an OLED without encapsulation is limited to only several hours. Figure 2. Photographs of the blue (top), green (middle), and white (bottom) flexible LEDs at operation under different bending conditions. We have also used our composite NW/polymer membrane architecture to realize a flexible white LED (see Figure 2). To achieve this device we follow the standard approach of down-converting blue emission with yellow phosphors, i.e., to get white light from a blue–yellow mixture. To adapt this scheme for our flexible NW LEDs, we added yellow cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet phosphors into the PDMS layer between the NWs and covered the surface with an additional phosphorous-doped PDMS cap.5 The phosphor particles we use are smaller than 0.5μm so that they can fill the gaps between the NWs. The light that is emitted by the NWs is thus partially converted by the phosphors from blue to yellow, and we achieve a broad spectrum (covering almost the full visible range). Our NW membrane lift-off and transfer procedure allows free-standing layers of NW materials with different bandgaps to be assembled without any constraints relating to lattice-matching or compatability of growth conditions. Our approach therefore provides a large amount of design freedom and modularity, i.e., because it enables materials with very different physical and chemical properties to be combined (which cannot be achieved with monolithic growth). We made use of this modularity to demonstrate a two-color device, in which we combined two flexible LED layers that contain different active NWs: see Figure 3(a). In this device, we mounted a fully transparent flexible blue LED on top of a green LED. We were able to bias the two LEDs separately by producing either blue or green light, or by simultaneously producing a light mixture. We show the electrolumniscence spectra from the different layers of this bicolor flexible LED in Figure 3(b). Figure 3. (a) Schematic illustration of a blue-green two-color flexible NW LED, in which a fully transparent blue LED is mounted on top of a green LED. The two LEDs are biased separately (i.e., V1 and V2). (b) Electroluminescence (EL) spectra (in arbitrary units) of the two-color flexible NW LED. The blue, green, and red curves show the emissions from the top layer, bottom layer, and both layers together (biased simultaneously), respectively. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated a new procedure for the fabrication of efficient, flexible nitride NW LEDs. In our approach, we embed GaN NWs within a PDMS membrane and have realized blue, green, and white LEDs that exhibit good bending, electrical, luminescent, and temporal stability characteristics. The modularity of our technique means that we can also produce bicolor devices in which one LED is mounted upon another. Our approach thus opens up new routes to achieving efficient flexible LEDs and other optoelectronic devices, such as red-green-blue flexible LEDs or displays, flexible NW-based photodetectors6, or solar cells. In our future research we will concentrate on improving the efficiency of our flexible light-emitting devices, which is not yet comparable to that of commercialized rigid thin-film LEDs. We will also try to integrate the flexible light sources into life-science applications. This work has been financially supported through the 'PLATOFIL' project (ANR-14-CE26-0020-01), the EU H2020 ERC ‘NanoHarvest’ project (grant 639052), and by the French national Labex GaNex project (ANR-11-LABX-2014). The device fabrication was performed at the Centrale de Technologie Universitaire's Institut d'Electronique Fondamental (CTU-IEF) Minerve technological platform, which is a member of the Renatech Recherche Technologique de Base network. Center for Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies Paris-Sud University, CNRS Nan Guan is a PhD candidate in physics. He received both his master's and engineering degrees in optics from Université Paris-Saclay, France, in 2015. His current research interests include nanofabrication, characterization, and optical simulations for nitride nanowire LEDs. Xing Dai received her PhD in applied physics from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, in 2014. During her time as a postdoctoral researcher at Paris-Sud University, she focused on flexible nanowire LEDs. She is currently a process-development engineer at Almae Technologies. Maria Tchernycheva received her PhD in physics from Paris-Sud University in 2005. She joined CNRS in 2006, where she currently leads the ‘NanoPhotoNit’ research group. Her research focuses on the fabrication and testing of novel optoelectronic devices that are based on semiconductor nanowires. Quantum Photonics, Electronics and Engineering (PHELIQS) Institute for Nanoscience and Cryogenics, French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) Joël Eymery obtained his engineering degree, PhD, and habilitation from Université Grenoble Alpes, France, and now leads CEA's Nanostructures and Synchrotron Laboratory. His research is focused on the development of nanowire physics, including metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy growth of nitride compounds, structural and optical characterization, and the development of nanodevice demonstrators. Christophe Durand received his PhD in physics from the Université Joseph Fourier, France, in 2004. Since 2006, he has been an associate professor at the Université Grenoble Alpes. In his research, he focuses on the synthesis of novel III-N nanostructures by metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy to develop new optoelectronic applications. Quantum Photonics, Electronics and Engineering (PHELIQS)Institute for Nanoscience and Cryogenics, French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) 2. N. Guan, X. Dai, J. Eymery, C. Durand, M. Tchernycheva, Nitride nanowires for new functionalities: from single wire properties to flexible light-emitting diodes. Presented at SPIE Photonics West 2016. 3. R. Koester, J.-S. Hwang, D. Salomon, X. Chen, C. Bougerol, J.-P. Barnes, D. Le Si Dang, et al., M-plane core-shell InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-wells on GaN wires for electroluminescent devices, Nano Lett. 11, p. 4839-4845, 2011. 4. X. Dai, A. Messanvi, H. Zhang, C. Durand, J. Eymery, C. Bougerol, F. H. Julien, M. Tchernycheva, Flexible light-emitting diodes based on vertical nitride nanowires, Nano Lett. 15, p. 6958-6964, 2015. 5. N. Guan, X. Dai, A. Messanvi, H. Zhang, J. Yan, E. Gautier, C. Bougerol, et al., Flexible white light emitting diodes based on nitride nanowires and nanophosphors, ACS Photonics 3, p. 597-603, 2016.


"We're developing tools that will allow us to dig deeper into the science of how the brain works," said Shadi Dayeh, an electrical engineering professor at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and the team's lead investigator. "We envision that this nanowire technology could be used on stem-cell-derived brain models to identify the most effective drugs for neurological diseases," said Anne Bang, director of cell biology at the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics at the Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute. The project was a collaborative effort between the Dayeh and Bang labs, neurobiologists at UC San Diego, and researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and Sandia National Laboratories. The researchers published their work Apr. 10 in Nano Letters. Researchers can uncover details about a neuron's health, activity and response to drugs by measuring ion channel currents and changes in its intracellular potential, which is due to the difference in ion concentration between the inside and outside of the cell. The state-of-the-art measurement technique is sensitive to small potential changes and provides readings with high signal-to-noise ratios. However, this method is destructive—it can break the cell membrane and eventually kill the cell. It is also limited to analyzing only one cell at a time, making it impractical for studying large networks of neurons, which are how they are naturally arranged in the body. "Existing high sensitivity measurement techniques are not scalable to 2D and 3D tissue-like structures cultured in vitro," Dayeh said. "The development of a nanoscale technology that can measure rapid and minute potential changes in neuronal cellular networks could accelerate drug development for diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems." The nanowire technology developed in Dayeh's laboratory is nondestructive and can simultaneously measure potential changes in multiple neurons—with the high sensitivity and resolution achieved by the current state of the art. The device consists of an array of silicon nanowires densely packed on a small chip patterned with nickel electrode leads that are coated with silica. The nanowires poke inside cells without damaging them and are sensitive enough to measure small potential changes that are a fraction of or a few millivolts in magnitude. Researchers used the nanowires to record the electrical activity of neurons that were isolated from mice and derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. These neurons survived and continued functioning for at least six weeks while interfaced with the nanowire array in vitro. Another innovative feature of this technology is it can isolate the electrical signal measured by each individual nanowire. "This is unusual in existing nanowire technologies, where several wires are electrically shorted together and you cannot differentiate the signal from every single wire," Dayeh said. To overcome this hurdle, researchers invented a new wafer bonding approach to fuse the silicon nanowires to the nickel electrodes. Their approach involved a process called silicidation, which is a reaction that binds two solids (silicon and another metal) together without melting either material. This process prevents the nickel electrodes from liquidizing, spreading out and shorting adjacent electrode leads. Silicidation is usually used to make contacts to transistors, but this is the first time it is being used to do patterned wafer bonding, Dayeh said. "And since this process is used in semiconductor device fabrication, we can integrate versions of these nanowires with CMOS electronics." Dayeh's laboratory holds several pending patent applications for this technology. Dayeh noted that the technology needs further optimization for brain-on-chip drug screening. His team is working to extend the application of the technology to heart-on-chip drug screening for cardiac diseases and in vivo brain mapping, which is still several years away due to significant technological and biological challenges that the researchers need to overcome. "Our ultimate goal is to translate this technology to a device that can be implanted in the brain." More information: Ren Liu et al, High Density Individually Addressable Nanowire Arrays Record Intracellular Activity from Primary Rodent and Human Stem Cell Derived Neurons, Nano Letters (2017). DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04752


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Leaders from 10 Southeast Asian countries are talking this week, possibly about peaceful use of the heavily disputed South China Sea. Four have claims to the resource-rich tract of water and China says nearly the whole 3.5 million-square-km body of water belongs under its flag instead. Discussion about the South China Sea now and throughout the year among the Association of Southeast Asian Nation (ASEAN) leaders may spawn a framework code of conduct by June, to be refined later in the year or from 2018. The code of conduct – broadly a set of rules aimed at heading off mishaps in disputed waters – has eluded Asia since parties signed an initial Declaration of Conduct in 2002 to kick off negotiations a full-on code. Once the deal happens, Vietnam will be the biggest loser. The ASEAN member with an extra hefty South China Sea claim will want a code of conduct or whatever it is to cover the Paracel Islands. But China has controlled those 130 features southwest of Hong Kong since a brief battle in 1974 with what was then South Vietnam. Modern Vietnam still claims what it lost. But China is unlikely to let Vietnam or anyone else pass ships near the Paracels for any reason without incident, meaning it would oppose any regional code of conduct that implies another country can access its reefs, atolls and surrounding tropical waters. China has already held up the code for the past six years over fears it would compromise Chinese control over the sea. Vietnam and three other Southeast Asian countries have stakes in another South China Sea archipelago, the Spratly Islands, which they effectively share with China. They’re all looking for gas or oil under the sea, which is otherwise coveted mainly for fisheries. If China doesn’t want a safe driving agreement in the Spratly chain, it’s as much at risk of mishap as any other player. “No one can force China out of the Paracels,” says Carl Thayer, emeritus professor of politics at The University of New South Wales in Australia. "The most you could hope for is if Vietnam took arbitral action," such as a petition with the world court in The Hague, he adds. Vietnam happens to be trying to get along better with China on its own despite centuries of land and sea disputes. Anti-Chinese sentiment still runs high among Vietnamese people, but the government in Hanoi is talking with Beijing outside the ASEAN context about the maritime issue while enjoying economic benefits such as cheap imports and a flood of Chinese tourists. China may eventually face pressure from the U.S. government over its past decade of maritime expansion, including artificial islands ready for combat aircraft and radar systems. For now it can pacify otherwise restive Southeast Asian claimants one-on-one by offering aid and investment. The other claimants are Brunei, Malaysia and the Philippines. Vietnam’s ASEAN colleagues, which are meeting for four days in the Philippines through Saturday, probably won’t push China over the Paracels even if Vietnam tries to. ASEAN counts staunchly pro-China Cambodia and Laos among its members. This year’s chair, the Philippines, has set aside its maritime disputes with China, too. ASEAN as a whole usually pursues deals that elevate its unity rather than risking rifts among them or with other countries. Lack of a Paracels clause in an eventual code of conduct will give China more sway over those islets where it has already built a small city plus military infrastructure. “I don’t think China will want to have that in the code of conduct, because I think for China the Paracels is a bilateral issue between itself and Vietnam, and I would even go further to say some of the ASEAN states may not want to be part of it because they would see the Paracels as an unnecessary complicating factor,” said Collin Koh, maritime security research fellow at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.


A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class. The new material could lead to smaller, faster, and more powerful electronics, as well as more efficient solar cells. The discovery is being published today in Nature Communications, an open access journal that publishes high-quality research from all areas of the natural sciences. Researchers say that what makes this new material so unique is that it has a high conductivity, which helps electronics conduct more electricity and become more powerful. But the material also has a wide bandgap, which means light can easily pass through the material making it optically transparent. In most cases, materials with wide bandgap, usually have either low conductivity or poor transparency. “The high conductivity and wide bandgap make this an ideal material for making optically transparent conducting films which could be used in a wide variety of electronic devices, including high power electronics, electronic displays, touchscreens and even solar cells in which light needs to pass through the device,” said Bharat Jalan, a University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science professor and the lead researcher on the study. Currently, most of the transparent conductors in our electronics use a chemical element called indium. The price of indium has generally gone up over the last two decades, which has added to the cost of current display technology. As a result, there has been tremendous effort to find alternative materials that work as well, or even better, than indium-based transparent conductors. In this study, researchers found a solution. They developed a new transparent conducting thin film using a novel synthesis method, in which they grew a BaSnO  thin film (a combination of barium, tin and oxygen, called barium stannate), but replaced elemental tin source with a chemical precursor of tin. The chemical precursor of tin has unique, radical properties that enhanced the chemical reactivity and greatly improved the metal oxide formation process. Both barium and tin are significantly cheaper than indium and are abundantly available. “We were quite surprised at how well this unconventional approach worked the very first time we used the tin chemical precursor,” said University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science graduate student Abhinav Prakash, the first author of the paper. “It was a big risk, but it was quite a big breakthrough for us.” Jalan and Prakash said this new process allowed them to create this material with unprecedented control over thickness, composition, and defect concentration and that this process should be highly suitable for a number of other material systems where the element is hard to oxidize. The new process is also reproducible and scalable. They further added that it was the structurally superior quality with improved defect concentration that allowed them to discover high conductivity in the material. They said the next step is to continue to reduce the defects at the atomic scale. “Even though this material has the highest conductivity within the same materials class, there is much room for improvement in addition, to the outstanding potential for discovering new physics if we decrease the defects. That’s our next goal,” Jalan said. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), and U.S. Department of Energy. In addition to Jalan and Prakash, the research team included Peng Xu, University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science graduate student; Cynthia S. Lo, Washington University assistant professor; Alireza Faghaninia, former graduate student at Washington University; Sudhanshu Shukla, researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Nanyang Technological University; and Joel W. Ager III, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California Berkeley adjunct professor. To read the full paper, entitled “Wide Bandgap BaSnO  Films with Room Temperature Conductivity Exceeding 104 Scm-1,” visit the Nature Communications website.


Home > Press > Discovery of new transparent thin film material could improve electronics and solar cells: Conductivity is highest-ever for thin film oxide semiconductor material Abstract: A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class. The new material could lead to smaller, faster, and more powerful electronics, as well as more efficient solar cells. The discovery is being published today in Nature Communications, an open access journal that publishes high-quality research from all areas of the natural sciences. Researchers say that what makes this new material so unique is that it has a high conductivity, which helps electronics conduct more electricity and become more powerful. But the material also has a wide bandgap, which means light can easily pass through the material making it optically transparent. In most cases, materials with wide bandgap, usually have either low conductivity or poor transparency. "The high conductivity and wide bandgap make this an ideal material for making optically transparent conducting films which could be used in a wide variety of electronic devices, including high power electronics, electronic displays, touchscreens and even solar cells in which light needs to pass through the device," said Bharat Jalan, a University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science professor and the lead researcher on the study. Currently, most of the transparent conductors in our electronics use a chemical element called indium. The price of indium has gone up tremendously in the past few years significantly adding to the cost of current display technology. As a result, there has been tremendous effort to find alternative materials that work as well, or even better, than indium-based transparent conductors. In this study, researchers found a solution. They developed a new transparent conducting thin film using a novel synthesis method, in which they grew a BaSnO3 thin film (a combination of barium, tin and oxygen, called barium stannate), but replaced elemental tin source with a chemical precursor of tin. The chemical precursor of tin has unique, radical properties that enhanced the chemical reactivity and greatly improved the metal oxide formation process. Both barium and tin are significantly cheaper than indium and are abundantly available. "We were quite surprised at how well this unconventional approach worked the very first time we used the tin chemical precursor," said University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science graduate student Abhinav Prakash, the first author of the paper. "It was a big risk, but it was quite a big breakthrough for us." Jalan and Prakash said this new process allowed them to create this material with unprecedented control over thickness, composition, and defect concentration and that this process should be highly suitable for a number of other material systems where the element is hard to oxidize. The new process is also reproducible and scalable. They further added that it was the structurally superior quality with improved defect concentration that allowed them to discover high conductivity in the material. They said the next step is to continue to reduce the defects at the atomic scale. "Even though this material has the highest conductivity within the same materials class, there is much room for improvement in addition, to the outstanding potential for discovering new physics if we decrease the defects. That's our next goal," Jalan said. ### The research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), and U.S. Department of Energy. In addition to Jalan and Prakash, the research team included Peng Xu, University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science graduate student; Cynthia S. Lo, Washington University assistant professor; Alireza Faghaninia, former graduate student at Washington University; Sudhanshu Shukla, researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Nanyang Technological University; and Joel W. Ager III, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California Berkeley adjunct professor. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class. The new material could lead to smaller, faster, and more powerful electronics, as well as more efficient solar cells. The discovery is being published today in Nature Communications, an open access journal that publishes high-quality research from all areas of the natural sciences. Researchers say that what makes this new material so unique is that it has a high conductivity, which helps electronics conduct more electricity and become more powerful. But the material also has a wide bandgap, which means light can easily pass through the material making it optically transparent. In most cases, materials with wide bandgap, usually have either low conductivity or poor transparency. "The high conductivity and wide bandgap make this an ideal material for making optically transparent conducting films which could be used in a wide variety of electronic devices, including high power electronics, electronic displays, touchscreens and even solar cells in which light needs to pass through the device," said Bharat Jalan, a University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science professor and the lead researcher on the study. Currently, most of the transparent conductors in our electronics use a chemical element called indium. The price of indium has generally gone up over the last two decades, which has added to the cost of current display technology. As a result, there has been tremendous effort to find alternative materials that work as well, or even better, than indium-based transparent conductors. In this study, researchers found a solution. They developed a new transparent conducting thin film using a novel synthesis method, in which they grew a BaSnO3 thin film (a combination of barium, tin and oxygen, called barium stannate), but replaced elemental tin source with a chemical precursor of tin. The chemical precursor of tin has unique, radical properties that enhanced the chemical reactivity and greatly improved the metal oxide formation process. Both barium and tin are significantly cheaper than indium and are abundantly available. "We were quite surprised at how well this unconventional approach worked the very first time we used the tin chemical precursor," said University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science graduate student Abhinav Prakash, the first author of the paper. "It was a big risk, but it was quite a big breakthrough for us." Jalan and Prakash said this new process allowed them to create this material with unprecedented control over thickness, composition, and defect concentration and that this process should be highly suitable for a number of other material systems where the element is hard to oxidize. The new process is also reproducible and scalable. They further added that it was the structurally superior quality with improved defect concentration that allowed them to discover high conductivity in the material. They said the next step is to continue to reduce the defects at the atomic scale. "Even though this material has the highest conductivity within the same materials class, there is much room for improvement in addition, to the outstanding potential for discovering new physics if we decrease the defects. That's our next goal," Jalan said. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), and U.S. Department of Energy. In addition to Jalan and Prakash, the research team included Peng Xu, University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science graduate student; Cynthia S. Lo, Washington University assistant professor; Alireza Faghaninia, former graduate student at Washington University; Sudhanshu Shukla, researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Nanyang Technological University; and Joel W. Ager III, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California Berkeley adjunct professor. To read the full paper, entitled "Wide Bandgap BaSnO3 Films with Room Temperature Conductivity Exceeding 104 Scm-1," visit the Nature Communications website.


Inaugural events offer effective strategic platform for industry leaders, experts, and next generation of talent to advance regional growth potential The inaugural Rotorcraft Asia, the region's first-ever dedicated event for civil helicopter industry is focused on offering an effective strategic platform for industry leaders, potential partners and experts to forge partnerships, engage in dialogues and showcase new innovative technologies, to unlock the region's growing industry. Top executives, regulators, industry experts, academics and leading industry players from more than 45 countries across 4 continents will converge at Rotorcraft Asia 2017 to drive discussions on industry challenges, emerging needs and new innovative solutions. Adding dimensions to the discourse, the co-located Unmanned Systems Asia 2017 will explore the "Future of Drones" that will feature diverse insights into unmanned systems and showcase the advances of the 21st century. Held from 18 to 20 April 2017 at the Changi Exhibition Centre in Singapore, over 80 companies from close to 20 countries will gather to showcase a vast spectrum of cutting edge and innovative solutions in rotorcraft and unmanned systems. In addition to featuring new technologies and innovations, the events will also engage young talent with the focus on cultivating and grooming the next generation of industry leaders. "The growing necessity to integrate smart technologies to drive efficiency and competitiveness has increased the need for the rotorcraft industry to continuously evolve and invest in new innovative technologies," said Mr Leck Chet Lam, Managing Director, Experia Events. "The events are co-located to ensure industry players have one single effective platform to advance regional growth potential." "The inaugural events not only provide a networking platform and access to a wide spectrum of growth opportunities in Asia-Pacific's thriving civil helicopter and unmanned systems markets, they also enhance Singapore's position as the leading aerospace hub in the region," said Mr Tan Kong Hwee, Director, Transport Engineering, Singapore Economic Development Board. -Shaping The Innovation Agenda Through Insightful Dialogues Rotorcraft Asia and Unmanned Systems Asia will feature a series of strategic conferences and forums over the three days. The Unmanned Systems Asia 2017 Forum, held on 18 April, will explore the theme of "Future of Drones" to present varied views from commercial users of aerial drones in different industries, with the aim of providing thought provoking discussions on the future potential of having aerial drones performing more varied tasks. The Rotorcraft Asia Conference, themed "Innovation in Rotorcraft", will be held on 19 and 20 April, with the focus on new technologies and solutions for rotary wing aircraft. The two-day conference will feature keynote and panel speakers who will seek to explore the future landscape of how rotorcraft will fly and operate, through the application of next generation innovative technologies, mindset and engineering processes. -Strategic Springboard to Enable Collaboration Across Markets The VIP Buyers Programme demonstrates the role of Rotorcraft Asia and Unmanned Systems Asia as a strategic springboard to enable exhibitors and potential buyers to network and collaborate on business opportunities in this region. Through pre-arranged meetings, exhibitors can use this dedicated face time to forge strategic new partnerships. The VIP Buyers attending include senior public sector representatives from the Ministry of Public Security of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, Philippine National Police, Royal Malaysia Police, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation, Myanmar, and Royal Brunei Technical Services; as well as commercial buyers including BP, Shell Aviation, PT Derazona Air Service, Macquarie Rotorcraft Leasing, PhilJets, Thai Helicopter Services, Waypoint Leasing among others. -Next-Generation Industry Talents At The Forefront With Drone Innovations The University R&D Showcase will display innovative unmanned systems solutions of tomorrow that have been developed by Singapore's top universities and tertiary institutions, contributing to Singapore's vision to be a Smart Nation. Participating IHLs include Singapore Polytechnic, National University of Singapore (NUS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), and University of Glasgow Singapore in partnership with Singapore Institute of Technology. Rotorcraft Asia 2017 and Unmanned Systems Asia 2017 are organised by Experia Events with the support of the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore, the Defence Science and Technology Agency, International Enterprise Singapore, the Ministry of Transport, Singapore, the Singapore Economic Development Board and the Singapore Exhibition and Convention Bureau. For more information, visit www.rotorcraft-asia.com and www.unmannedsystems-asia.com. About Rotorcraft Asia Rotorcraft Asia is a dedicated commercial and para-public helicopter event for the thriving Asia Pacific Market. It is the premier business and networking platform for manufacturers, owners and operators, MROs, distributors of products and services for the rotorcraft and related industry. Comprising an exhibition, conference and static aircraft display, the inaugural Rotorcraft Asia will be an integrated marketplace to springboard and tap into opportunities in this dynamic region. For more information, visit www.rotorcraft-asia.com. About Unmanned Systems Asia The premier unmanned systems event in Asia presents the future of drones across a vast spectrum of commercial and defence applications, showcasing cutting edge technologies and solutions in aerial, ground, surface and underwater systems. Unmanned Systems Asia offers a highly effective platform for stakeholders to advance their search and rescue, communications, monitoring and surveillance capabilities. The show brings together manufacturers, suppliers, service providers, buyers, academia, governments, research and regulatory bodies to explore the limitless opportunities of unmanned systems. For more information, visit www.unmannedsystems-asia.com. About Experia Events Pte Ltd Experia Events specialises in organising and managing exhibitions and conferences of strategic interest, fostering industry development and thought leadership. It has built a strong portfolio in aerospace and defence with the highly successful Singapore Airshow, Asia's largest aerospace and defence event, as well as the inaugural Singapore International Robo Expo and key events such as IMDEX Asia, Asia Pacific's flagship maritime defence show; Rotorcraft Asia, the premier dedicated event for the global civil helicopter industry; Unmanned Systems Asia, which presents the future of unmanned systems across a vast spectrum of commercial and defence applications; and Cybertech Asia, a strategic platform for the international cyber community. Experia Events' expertise also extends to the government and lifestyle sectors, through key events such as the World Cities Summit, Singapore International Water Week and CleanEnviro Summit Singapore. With a proven track record underscoring its aspirations to stage events that influence, Experia Events aims to diversify its range of strategic events globally. For more information, visit www.experiaevents.com. For further enquiries, please contact: Marilyn Ho Experia Events Pte Ltd Director, Communications Tel: +65 6595 6130 Email: Ranjeet Kaur Hill+Knowlton Strategies Tel: +65 9025 7674 Email:


News Article | April 12, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. The new nanowire technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks. “We’re developing tools that will allow us to dig deeper into the science of how the brain works,” says Shadi Dayeh, an electrical engineering professor at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and the team’s lead investigator. “We envision that this nanowire technology could be used on stem-cell-derived brain models to identify the most effective drugs for neurological diseases,” says Anne Bang, director of cell biology at the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics at the Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute. The project was a collaborative effort between the Dayeh and Bang labs, neurobiologists at UC San Diego, and researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and Sandia National Laboratories. The researchers published their work Apr. 10 in Nano Letters. Researchers can uncover details about a neuron’s health, activity and response to drugs by measuring ion channel currents and changes in its intracellular potential, which is due to the difference in ion concentration between the inside and outside of the cell. The state-of-the-art measurement technique is sensitive to small potential changes and provides readings with high signal-to-noise ratios. However, this method is destructive — it can break the cell membrane and eventually kill the cell. It is also limited to analyzing only one cell at a time, making it impractical for studying large networks of neurons, which are how they are naturally arranged in the body. “Existing high sensitivity measurement techniques are not scalable to 2D and 3D tissue-like structures cultured in vitro,” Dayeh says. “The development of a nanoscale technology that can measure rapid and minute potential changes in neuronal cellular networks could accelerate drug development for diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems.” The nanowire technology developed in Dayeh’s laboratory is nondestructive and can simultaneously measure potential changes in multiple neurons — with the high sensitivity and resolution achieved by the current state of the art. The device consists of an array of silicon nanowires densely packed on a small chip patterned with nickel electrode leads that are coated with silica. The nanowires poke inside cells without damaging them and are sensitive enough to measure small potential changes that are a fraction of or a few millivolts in magnitude. Researchers used the nanowires to record the electrical activity of neurons that were isolated from mice and derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. These neurons survived and continued functioning for at least six weeks while interfaced with the nanowire array in vitro. Another innovative feature of this technology is it can isolate the electrical signal measured by each individual nanowire. “This is unusual in existing nanowire technologies, where several wires are electrically shorted together and you cannot differentiate the signal from every single wire,” Dayeh says. To overcome this hurdle, researchers invented a new wafer bonding approach to fuse the silicon nanowires to the nickel electrodes. Their approach involved a process called silicidation, which is a reaction that binds two solids (silicon and another metal) together without melting either material. This process prevents the nickel electrodes from liquidizing, spreading out and shorting adjacent electrode leads. Silicidation is usually used to make contacts to transistors, but this is the first time it is being used to do patterned wafer bonding, Dayeh says. “And since this process is used in semiconductor device fabrication, we can integrate versions of these nanowires with CMOS electronics.” Dayeh’s laboratory holds several pending patent applications for this technology. Dayeh notes that the technology needs further optimization for brain-on-chip drug screening. His team is working to extend the application of the technology to heart-on-chip drug screening for cardiac diseases and in vivo brain mapping, which is still several years away due to significant technological and biological challenges that the researchers need to overcome. “Our ultimate goal is to translate this technology to a device that can be implanted in the brain.” A patent is pending for this technology. Co-authors of the study are Ren Liu, Renjie Chen, Ahmed T. E. Youssef, Sang Heon Lee, Massoud L. Khraiche, John Scott, Yoontae Hwang, Atsunori Tanaka, Yun Goo Ro, Albert K. Matsushita, Xing Dai and Yimin Zhou of UC San Diego; Sandy Hinckley, Deborah Pre and Steven Biesmans of Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute; Cesare Soci of Nanyang Technological University; and Anthony James, John Nogan, Katherine L. Jungjohann, Douglas V. Pete, and Denise B. Webb of Sandia National Laboratories. This work was supported by a National Science Foundation CAREER award. The team also acknowledges support from the Center for Brain Activity Mapping at UC San Diego, a Calit2 Strategic Research Opportunities award from the Qualcomm Institute at UC San Diego, a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Exploratory Research Award from Los Alamos National Laboratory, the National Institutes of Health, a March of Dimes award and a UC San Diego Frontiers of Innovation Scholar Program award. This work was performed in part at UC San Diego’s Nanotechnology Infrastructure, a member of the National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure, which is supported by the National Science Foundation.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Home > Press > 'Neuron-reading' nanowires could accelerate development of drugs for neurological diseases Abstract: A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. The new nanowire technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks. "We're developing tools that will allow us to dig deeper into the science of how the brain works," said Shadi Dayeh, an electrical engineering professor at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and the team's lead investigator. "We envision that this nanowire technology could be used on stem-cell-derived brain models to identify the most effective drugs for neurological diseases," said Anne Bang, director of cell biology at the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics at the Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute. The project was a collaborative effort between the Dayeh and Bang labs, neurobiologists at UC San Diego, and researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and Sandia National Laboratories. The researchers published their work Apr. 10 in Nano Letters. Researchers can uncover details about a neuron's health, activity and response to drugs by measuring ion channel currents and changes in its intracellular potential, which is due to the difference in ion concentration between the inside and outside of the cell. The state-of-the-art measurement technique is sensitive to small potential changes and provides readings with high signal-to-noise ratios. However, this method is destructive -- it can break the cell membrane and eventually kill the cell. It is also limited to analyzing only one cell at a time, making it impractical for studying large networks of neurons, which are how they are naturally arranged in the body. "Existing high sensitivity measurement techniques are not scalable to 2D and 3D tissue-like structures cultured in vitro," Dayeh said. "The development of a nanoscale technology that can measure rapid and minute potential changes in neuronal cellular networks could accelerate drug development for diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems." The nanowire technology developed in Dayeh's laboratory is nondestructive and can simultaneously measure potential changes in multiple neurons -- with the high sensitivity and resolution achieved by the current state of the art. The device consists of an array of silicon nanowires densely packed on a small chip patterned with nickel electrode leads that are coated with silica. The nanowires poke inside cells without damaging them and are sensitive enough to measure small potential changes that are a fraction of or a few millivolts in magnitude. Researchers used the nanowires to record the electrical activity of neurons that were isolated from mice and derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. These neurons survived and continued functioning for at least six weeks while interfaced with the nanowire array in vitro. Another innovative feature of this technology is it can isolate the electrical signal measured by each individual nanowire. "This is unusual in existing nanowire technologies, where several wires are electrically shorted together and you cannot differentiate the signal from every single wire," Dayeh said. To overcome this hurdle, researchers invented a new wafer bonding approach to fuse the silicon nanowires to the nickel electrodes. Their approach involved a process called silicidation, which is a reaction that binds two solids (silicon and another metal) together without melting either material. This process prevents the nickel electrodes from liquidizing, spreading out and shorting adjacent electrode leads. Silicidation is usually used to make contacts to transistors, but this is the first time it is being used to do patterned wafer bonding, Dayeh said. "And since this process is used in semiconductor device fabrication, we can integrate versions of these nanowires with CMOS electronics." Dayeh's laboratory holds several pending patent applications for this technology. Dayeh noted that the technology needs further optimization for brain-on-chip drug screening. His team is working to extend the application of the technology to heart-on-chip drug screening for cardiac diseases and in vivo brain mapping, which is still several years away due to significant technological and biological challenges that the researchers need to overcome. "Our ultimate goal is to translate this technology to a device that can be implanted in the brain." ### A patent is pending for this technology. Contact Skip Cynar in the campus Innovation and Commercialization Office at or (858) 822-2672 for licensing information. This work was supported by a National Science Foundation CAREER award (ECCS-1351980). The team also acknowledges support from the Center for Brain Activity Mapping at UC San Diego, a Calit2 Strategic Research Opportunities award (CITD137) from the Qualcomm Institute at UC San Diego, a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Exploratory Research Award (LDRD-ER) from Los Alamos National Laboratory, the National Institutes of Health (R21 MH099082), a March of Dimes award and a UC San Diego Frontiers of Innovation Scholar Program award. This work was performed in part at UC San Diego's Nanotechnology Infrastructure, a member of the National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure, which is supported by the National Science Foundation (grant ECCS-1542148). For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


Chian K.S.,Nanyang Technological University | Leong M.F.,Institute Of Bioengineering And Nanotechnology, Singapore | Kono K.,National University of Singapore | Kono K.,Fukushima Medical University
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2015

Removal of malignant tissue in patients with oesophageal cancer and replacement with autologous grafts from the stomach and colon can lead to problems. The need to reduce stenosis and anastomotic leakage after oesophagectomy is a high priority. Developments in tissue-engineering methods and cell-sheet technology have improved scaffold materials for oesophageal repair. Despite the many successful animal studies, few tissue-engineering approaches have progressed to clinical trials. In this Review, we discuss the status of oesophagus reconstruction after surgery. In particular, we highlight two clinical trials that used decellularised constructs and epithelial cell sheets to replace excised tissues after endoscopic submucosal dissection or mucosal resection procedures. Results from the trials showed that both decellularised grafts and epithelial-cell sheets prevented stenosis. By contrast, animal studies have shown that the use of tissue-engineered constructs after oesophagectomy remains a challenge. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Li S.,Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications | Huo F.,Nanyang Technological University
Small | Year: 2014

Hybrid crystals containing encapsulated functional species exhibit promising novel physical and chemical properties. The realization of many properties critically depends on the selection of suitable functional species for incorporation, the rational control of the crystallinity of the host materials, and the manipulation of the distribution of the encapsulated species; only a few hybrid crystals achieve this. Here, a novel synthetic method enables the encapsulation of functional species within crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Various kinds of single-crystalline MOFs with incorporated particles are presented. The encapsulated particles can be distributed in a controllable manner, and the hybrid crystals are applied to the heterogeneous catalysis of the reduction of nitroarenes. These findings suggest a general approach for the construction of MOF materials with potential applications; by combining species and MOFs with suitable functionalities, new properties - not possible by other means - may arise. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Leong D.T.,National University of Singapore | Ng K.W.,Nanyang Technological University
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews | Year: 2014

For decades, 2D cell culture format on plastic has been the main workhorse in cancer research. Though many important understandings of cancer cell biology were derived using this platform, it is not a fair representation of the in vivo scenario. In this review, both established and new 3D cell culture systems are discussed with specific references to anti-cancer drug and nanomedicine applications. 3D culture systems exploit more realistic spatial, biochemical and cellular heterogeneity parameters to bridge the experimental gap between in vivo and in vitro settings when studying the performance and efficacy of novel nanomedicine strategies to manage cancer. However, the complexities associated with 3D culture systems also necessitate greater technical expertise in handling and characterizing in order to arrive at meaningful experimental conclusions. Finally, we have also provided future perspectives where cutting edge 3D culture technologies may be combined with under-explored technologies to build better in vitro cancer platforms. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Xiong S.,National University of Singapore | Chen J.S.,Nanyang Technological University | Lou X.W.,Nanyang Technological University | Zeng H.C.,National University of Singapore
Advanced Functional Materials | Year: 2012

In this work, a novel hydrothermal route is developed to synthesize cobalt carbonate hydroxide, Co(CO 3) 0.5(OH)·0. 11H 2O. In this method, sodium chloride salt is utilized to organize single-crystalline nanowires into a chrysanthemum-like hierarchical assembly. The morphological evolution process of this organized product is investigated by examining different reaction intermediates during the synthesis. The growth and thus the final assembly of the Co(CO 3) 0.5(OH) ·0.11H 2O can be finely tuned by selecting preparative parameters, such as the molar ratio of the starting chemicals, the additives, the reaction time and the temperature. Using the flower-like Co(CO 3) 0.5(OH)·0.11H 2O as a solid precursor, quasi-single-crystalline mesoporous Co 3O 4 nanowire arrays are prepared via thermal decomposition in air. Furthermore, carbon can be added onto the spinel oxide by a chemical-vapor-deposition method using acetylene, which leads to the generation of carbon-sheathed CoO nanowire arrays (CoO@C). Through comparing and analyzing the crystal structures, the resultant products and their high crystallinity can be explained by a sequential topotactic transformation of the respective precursors. The electrochemical performances of the typical cobalt oxide products are also evaluated. It is demonstrated that tuning of the surface texture and the pore size of the Co 3O 4 products is very important in lithium-ion-battery applications. The carbon-decorated CoO nanowire arrays exhibit an excellent cyclic performance with nearly 100% capacity retention in a testing range of 70 cycles. Therefore, this CoO@C nanocomposite can be considered to be an attractive candidate as an anode material for further investigation. The controlled, NaCl-mediated synthesis of chrysanthemum-like Co(CO 3) 0.5(OH)·0.11H 2O is demonstrated. The effects of the synthetic conditions are investigated in detail. The Co(CO 3) 0.5(OH)·0.11H 2O is converted to Co 3O 4 nanowire arrays by direct thermal decomposition and then to carbon-coated CoO (CoO@C) under the reducing ambience of C 2H 2. These CoO@C nanowire arrays are promising candidates for lithium-ion-battery applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Wang Z.,Nanyang Technological University | Luan D.,Nanyang Technological University | Madhavi S.,Nanyang Technological University | Hu Y.,Zhejiang Normal University | Lou X.W.,Nanyang Technological University
Energy and Environmental Science | Year: 2012

Novel hierarchical nanostructures composed of carbon coated α-Fe 2O 3 hollow nanohorns on carbon nanotube (CNT) backbones have been constructed by direct growth and thermal transformation of β-FeOOH nanospindles on CNTs, followed by carbon nanocoating. When evaluated as a potential anode material for lithium-ion batteries, such hierarchical structures exhibit superior lithium storage capabilities by virtue of their advantageous structural features. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Kai L.,Shanghai University | Kemao Q.,Nanyang Technological University
Optics Express | Year: 2013

A generalized regularized phase tracker (GRPT) for demodulation of a single fringe pattern was recently proposed. It is very successful for many fringe patterns. However, the GRPT has poor performance in the area where the fringe pattern is sparse. An improved GRPT (iGRPT) with two novel improvements is proposed to overcome the problem. First, the fixed window used in the GRPT is replaced by a spatially adaptive window. Second, a background regularization term and a modulation regularization term are incorporated in the cost function. With these two improvements, the proposed iGRPT can successfully demodulate sparse fringes and thus improves the demodulation capability of the GRPT. Simulation and experimental results are presented to verify the performance of the iGRPT. ©2013 Optical Society of America.


Yang Z.,Nanyang Technological University | Xie L.,Nanyang Technological University | Zhang C.,Swinburne University of Technology
IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing | Year: 2013

Direction of arrival (DOA) estimation is a classical problem in signal processing with many practical applications. Its research has recently been advanced owing to the development of methods based on sparse signal reconstruction. While these methods have shown advantages over conventional ones, there are still difficulties in practical situations where true DOAs are not on the discretized sampling grid. To deal with such an off-grid DOA estimation problem, this paper studies an off-grid model that takes into account effects of the off-grid DOAs and has a smaller modeling error. An iterative algorithm is developed based on the off-grid model from a Bayesian perspective while joint sparsity among different snapshots is exploited by assuming a Laplace prior for signals at all snapshots. The new approach applies to both single snapshot and multi-snapshot cases. Numerical simulations show that the proposed algorithm has improved accuracy in terms of mean squared estimation error. The algorithm can maintain high estimation accuracy even under a very coarse sampling grid. © 2012 IEEE.


Chhowalla M.,Rutgers University | Shin H.S.,Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology | Eda G.,National University of Singapore | Li L.-J.,Academia Sinica, Taiwan | And 2 more authors.
Nature Chemistry | Year: 2013

Ultrathin two-dimensional nanosheets of layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are fundamentally and technologically intriguing. In contrast to the graphene sheet, they are chemically versatile. Mono- or few-layered TMDs-obtained either through exfoliation of bulk materials or bottom-up syntheses-are direct-gap semiconductors whose bandgap energy, as well as carrier type (n- or p-type), varies between compounds depending on their composition, structure and dimensionality. In this Review, we describe how the tunable electronic structure of TMDs makes them attractive for a variety of applications. They have been investigated as chemically active electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and hydrosulfurization, as well as electrically active materials in opto-electronics. Their morphologies and properties are also useful for energy storage applications such as electrodes for Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Loh P.C.,Nanyang Technological University | Li D.,Nanyang Technological University | Blaabjerg F.,University of Aalborg
IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics | Year: 2013

Voltage-type Γ-Z-source inverters are proposed in this letter. They use a unique Γ-shaped impedance network for boosting their output voltage in addition to their usual voltage-buck behavior. Comparing them with other topologies, the proposed inverters use lesser components and a coupled transformer for producing the high-gain and modulation ratio simultaneously. The obtained gain can be tuned by varying the turns ratio γ Γ Z of the transformer within the narrow range of 1 < γ Γ Z≤ 2. This leads to lesser winding turns at high gain, as compared to other related topologies. Experimental testing has already proven the validity of the proposed inverters. © 1986-2012 IEEE.


Modi K.,University of Oxford | Modi K.,National University of Singapore | Brodutch A.,Macquarie University | Brodutch A.,University of Waterloo | And 5 more authors.
Reviews of Modern Physics | Year: 2012

One of the best signatures of nonclassicality in a quantum system is the existence of correlations that have no classical counterpart. Different methods for quantifying the quantum and classical parts of correlations are among the more actively studied topics of quantum-information theory over the past decade. Entanglement is the most prominent of these correlations, but in many cases unentangled states exhibit nonclassical behavior too. Thus distinguishing quantum correlations other than entanglement provides a better division between the quantum and classical worlds, especially when considering mixed states. Here different notions of classical and quantum correlations quantified by quantum discord and other related measures are reviewed. In the first half, the mathematical properties of the measures of quantum correlations are reviewed, related to each other, and the classical-quantum division that is common among them is discussed. In the second half, it is shown that the measures identify and quantify the deviation from classicality in various quantum-information- processing tasks, quantum thermodynamics, open-system dynamics, and many-body physics. It is shown that in many cases quantum correlations indicate an advantage of quantum methods over classical ones. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Zhou J.,Swinburne University of Technology | Wen C.,Nanyang Technological University | Li T.,Dalian Maritime University
IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control | Year: 2012

In this note, we consider a class of uncertain dynamic nonlinear systems preceded by Bouc-Wen type of hysteresis nonlinearity. A new perfect inverse function of the hysteresis is constructed and used to cancel the hysteresis effects in controller design with backstepping technique. For the design and implementation of the controller, no knowledge is assumed on system parameters. It is shown that the proposed controller not only guarantees asymptotic stability, but also transient performance. © 2012 IEEE.


Patil V.S.,National University of Singapore | Patil V.S.,Nanyang Technological University | Kai T.,National University of Singapore
Current Biology | Year: 2010

The Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) have been shown to safeguard the animal germline genome against deleterious retroelements [1-9]. Many factors involved in the production of piRNAs localize to nuage, a unique perinuclear structure in animal germline cells [10], suggesting that nuage may function as a site for processing of germline piRNAs [1, 3-6, 11-14]. Here we report a conserved yet uncharacterized component of the germline piRNA pathway, Tejas (Tej), which localizes to nuage. tej is required for the repression of some retroelements and for the production of sufficient germline piRNAs. The localization of Tej to nuage depends on vasa (vas) [15] and spindle-E (spn-E) [1, 16, 17] while it regulates the localization of Spn-E, Aubergine (Aub) [3, 4, 14], Argonaute3 (Ago3) [5], Krimper (Krimp) [13], and Maelstrom (Mael) [18] to nuage. Aub, Vas, and Spn-E physically interact with Tej through the N terminus containing the conserved tejas domain, which is necessary and sufficient for its germline function. Aub and Spn-E also bind to the tudor domain at the C terminus. Our data suggest that Tej contributes to the formation of a macromolecular complex at perinuclear region and engages it in the production of germline piRNAs. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Guerrero J.M.,University of Aalborg | Loh P.C.,Nanyang Technological University | Lee T.-L.,National Sun Yat - sen University | Chandorkar M.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics | Year: 2013

This paper summarizes the main problems and solutions of power quality in microgrids, distributed-energy-storage systems, and ac/dc hybrid microgrids. First, the power quality enhancement of grid-interactive microgrids is presented. Then, the cooperative control for enhance voltage harmonics and unbalances in microgrids is reviewed. Afterward, the use of static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) in grid-connected microgrids is introduced in order to improve voltage sags/swells and unbalances. Finally, the coordinated control of distributed storage systems and ac/dc hybrid microgrids is explained. © 1982-2012 IEEE.


Lu J.,Advanced Digital science Center | Tan Y.-P.,Nanyang Technological University | Wang G.,Nanyang Technological University
IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence | Year: 2013

Conventional appearance-based face recognition methods usually assume that there are multiple samples per person (MSPP) available for discriminative feature extraction during the training phase. In many practical face recognition applications such as law enhancement, e-passport, and ID card identification, this assumption, however, may not hold as there is only a single sample per person (SSPP) enrolled or recorded in these systems. Many popular face recognition methods fail to work well in this scenario because there are not enough samples for discriminant learning. To address this problem, we propose in this paper a novel discriminative multimanifold analysis (DMMA) method by learning discriminative features from image patches. First, we partition each enrolled face image into several nonoverlapping patches to form an image set for each sample per person. Then, we formulate the SSPP face recognition as a manifold-manifold matching problem and learn multiple DMMA feature spaces to maximize the manifold margins of different persons. Finally, we present a reconstruction-based manifold-manifold distance to identify the unlabeled subjects. Experimental results on three widely used face databases are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach. © 1979-2012 IEEE.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and National University of Singapore | Date: 2014-01-23

The invention relates to the C-terminal fragment of angiopoietin-related protein 4 [cAngptl4] as a diagnostic marker for viral and bacterial pneumonia; anti-angiopoietin-related protein 4 therapeutic antibodies, and the use of anti-angiopoietin-related protein 4 antibodies in the treatment of viral and bacterial pneumonia.


Patent
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2015-01-14

A method (100) of forming an integrated circuit is disclosed. The method comprises: (i) forming at least a pair of optoelectronic devices from at least a first wafer material arranged on a semiconductor substrate, the first wafer material different to silicon; (ii) etching the first wafer material to form a first recess to be filled with a second material; (iii) processing (104) the second material to form a waveguide for coupling the pair of optoelectronic devices to define an optical interconnect; and (iv) bonding (106) at least one partially processed CMOS device layer having at least one transistor to the second semiconductor substrate to form the integrated circuit, the partially processed CMOS device layer arranged adjacent to the optical interconnect. An integrated circuit is also disclosed.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and National University of Singapore | Date: 2013-09-19

A master-slave robotic endoscopy system includes a flexible primary endoscope probe having at least one tool channel for carrying a tendon-sheath driven robot arm and corresponding end effector, and a secondary endoscope probe channel for carrying an imaging endoscope. The imaging endoscope provides enhanced image capture range relative to a distal end of the primary endoscope probe by way of a secondary endoscope probe channel distal opening proximally offset from the primary endoscope probe distal end; a ramp structure distally carried by the primary endoscope probe; and/or one or more actuatable distal imaging endoscope regions. Robot arms can include joint primitives that enable robot arm/end effector manipulation in accordance with intended degrees of freedom. A set of quick connect/disconnect interfaces couple an actuation controller to one or more actuation assemblies insertable into the tool channel(s), where each actuation assembly includes tendon-sheath elements, a robot arm, and its corresponding end effector.


Patent
National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2011-05-03

According to various embodiments, a balloon inflating device may be provided. The balloon inflating device may include a balloon, a first substance within the balloon, a second substance within the balloon capable of having a reaction with the first substance to generate a gas within the balloon to inflate the balloon; and an electrical activator configured to activate the reaction between the first and second substances thus inflating the balloon. According to various embodiments, a method for inflating a balloon may be provided. The method for inflating a balloon may include providing a first substance within the balloon, providing a second substance within the balloon; and activating a reaction between the first and second substances electrically to generate a gas within the balloon to inflate the balloon.


Patent
National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2013-09-30

The present disclosure relates to ventilation tubes used in the treatment of aural maladies such as, for example, otitis media. A bio-absorbable ventilation tube, optionally containing a medicament, is described for use in a land mammal. The bio-absorbable ventilation tube can be customized for both specific treatment and specific degradation rate based in part on the quantity and type of medicament added to a polymer forming the bio-absorbable ventilation tube. A method of preparing the bio-absorbable ventilation tube of the present disclosure is also provided.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and National University of Singapore | Date: 2014-03-10

The invention relates to compounds for use as quorum sensing inhibitors, and in particular, to quorum sensing inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and Evoqua Water TEchnologies Pte. Ltd. | Date: 2014-04-10

A nanofiltration membrane comprising a selective layer comprising or consisting of poly(amide-imide) cross-linked with polyallyamine is provided. A method of manufacturing the nanofiltration membrane and use of the nanofiltration membrane in a water softening process that is carried out at a low pressure of less than about 2 bar is also provided.


Patent
National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2012-03-21

A bioabsorbable tracheal stent is provided. The bioabsorbable stent comprises a biodegradable polymer, wherein the biodegradable polymer comprises about 0 to 30 wt % glycerol, polyethylene glycol, triethyl citrate, or mixture thereof. A drug is dispersed within or dissolved in the biodegradable polymer. In a second and third aspect, the invention relates to methods of manufacturing a bioabsorbable tracheal stent. The first method includes forming a solution comprising a biodegradable polymer and a drug, the biodegradable polymer comprising about 0 to 30 wt % glycerol, polyethylene glycol, triethyl citrate, or mixture thereof. The method further comprises casting the solution to form the bioabsorbable tracheal stent. The second method includes forming a polymeric stent, and dip casting the polymeric stent in a solution comprising a biodegradable polymer and a drug to form a coating on the polymeric stent, wherein the biodegradable polymer comprises about 0 to 30 wt % glycerol, polyethylene glycol, triethyl citrate, or mixture thereof.


Patent
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Nanyang Technological University and National University of Singapore | Date: 2012-04-02

An imaging system is provided that includes a pulsed light source providing pulsed light and is applicable to both microscopes and endoscopes. One or more optical elements with certain dispersive properties are positioned to receive the pulsed light and apply selective dispersive properties to shift the focal plane according to the user and to produce two photon (2p) wide field uniform illumination and 2p wide field structured illumination for the purpose of improving the optical axial resolution and rejection of background signal. An imaging element receives the signal arising from the 2p wide field uniform illumination and 2p wide field structured illumination and produces a respective 3D resolved image of a sample.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and National University of Singapore | Date: 2014-02-25

Provided is a method of manufacturing a device for supporting biological material growth, including forming a first platform layer through a molding process, the first base layer including a central chamber; and a plurality of elongate channels coupling the central chamber to the periphery of the first platform layer; forming a second platform layer through a molding process; and coupling the first platform layer to the second platform layer. Accordingly, a device for supporting biological material growth is also provided.


Guerrero J.M.,University of Aalborg | Chandorkar M.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Lee T.-L.,National Sun Yat - sen University | Loh P.C.,Nanyang Technological University
IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics | Year: 2013

This paper presents a review of advanced control techniques for microgrids. This paper covers decentralized, distributed, and hierarchical control of grid-connected and islanded microgrids. At first, decentralized control techniques for microgrids are reviewed. Then, the recent developments in the stability analysis of decentralized controlled microgrids are discussed. Finally, hierarchical control for microgrids that mimic the behavior of the mains grid is reviewed. © 1982-2012 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: INCO.2012-1.4 | Award Amount: 4.55M | Year: 2012

SEA-EU-NET 2 will build upon and leverage strong EU-SEA S&T relationships developed through past support and coordination actions, to deepen engagement and build momentum in S&T cooperation. It broadens the scope of EU-SEA cooperation through stimulating sustainable innovation collaborations. SEA-EU-NET 2 will focus on three societal challenges: Health, Food security and safety, and Water management, where the greatest opportunities can be leveraged from joint EU-SEA research. SEA-EU-NET 2 will serve as a platform for all stakeholders across governments, funders, practitioners, and the private sector, to ensure a complete and integrated approach to developing sustainable STI collaboration to jointly tackle societal challenges. It will focus on: Dialogue: To strengthen bi-regional and bilateral EU-ASEAN dialogues in S&T cooperation Decision-Making: To report to policy makers in both Europe and Southeast Asia in order to pave the way to implement new ambitious bi-regional activities in STI Jointly Tackling Societal Challenges: To focus on joint efforts on a selected set of thematic areas, namely Health, Food security and safety, and Water management. In focussing on these topics, the project will evaluate EU-SEA S&T cooperation, run workshops to bring scientists together, support young scientists develop new funding schemes to broaden and deepen the collaboration Networking: To network different stakeholders to build bi-regional networks and to strengthen research capacity Sustainability: To ensure that all activities deliver impact beyond the lifespan of the project in order to develop sustainable partnerships The project will have lasting impact on (1) a structured and substantiated policy dialogue between ASEAN and EU, (2) the promotion of the ERA in SEA, (3) the role of EU as major partner in research cooperation and innovation by jointly tackling societal challenges, (4) the development of new funding schemes in research and academic mobility


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: INCO-2007-1.6 | Award Amount: 4.72M | Year: 2008

SEA-EU-NET will increase the quality, quantity, profile and impact of the bi-regional S&T cooperation between SEA countries of ASEAN and MS and AS of EU. S&T, essential for a strong knowledge-based economy, underpins policies necessary for governance, and contributes to cohesive social visions and models. S&T excellence also requires global connectivity and an ongoing dialogue. This proposal supports the internationalisation policy of EU and objectives of FP7 of EU. It contributes to S&T foundation essential to the EUs political, economic and social objectives. There is great potential in strengthening the participation of SEA in FP7 and for a conjoint European involvement in SEA S&T. Constraining factors include insufficient awareness of opportunities, inadequate connections amongst researchers, establishing partnerships, complexity of S&T programs, and the asynchronous funding systems. Thus increased SEA-EU cooperation requires targeted measures integrating and strengthening the S&T dialogue in a coherent way. The SEA-EU-NET will deliver measures to increase SEA-EU cooperation amongst academic, industrial and government stakeholders. Measures include implementation of joint for a strengthening the bi-regional and bilateral dialogue, analysing S&T structures, reporting to EU-presidencies thus incorporating recent political developments, and generally highlighting EU-ASEAN initiatives. In addition the project builds a network of stakeholders in the SEA region while at the same time linking it to other existing and upcoming ERA-, INCO-NET, and thematic EU-FP projects thus facilitating the development of a coherent EU-level approach on international S&T cooperation. Based on these structures SEA-EU-NET will also address global issues of mutual interest in regards to the challenges of the globalisation of research and reaching the global Millennium Goals by recommending joint S&T related activities and developing joint scenarios.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH-2010-4.1-1 | Award Amount: 10.16M | Year: 2011

GREEN will study the current and future role of the EU in an emerging multi-polar world through a programme of stock-taking, multi-disciplinary research and complementary activities. It aims at an understanding of the prospective directions of the emerging global governance structures and Europes place in them. Analysis will focus on the extant actors from the 20th century, the 21st century rising powers, the increasingly influential non-state actors (from civil and non-civil society) and the new transnational regulatory networks of public and private policy makers and regional agencies. While multi-polarity, with Europe as a pole, is a possibility, alternative scenarios are also plausible. A shift from a trans-Atlantic to trans-Pacific locus of power, or the depolarization and fragmentation of authority are such alternatives; both could marginalize Europe. But these are questions to be researched; not assertions to be made. The project will have 5 components: i) conceptual analyses of an emerging multi-polar world and the theory and practice of international organisation and networks in that world; ii) evolving EU policy and practice; iii) the effects of regional leadership from Africa, Asia-Pacific and the Americas; iv) projects on the EU and multi-polarity within the fields of human rights and security, energy, resources and environment, trade and finance; v) a foresight study detailing scenarios for EU policy towards the emerging world order. The research will be theoretical, policy-oriented and with an interactive dissemination strategy to assure feedback from its target-publics. The work will be undertaken by a manageable consortium of partners (from Belgium, UK, Netherlands, Denmark, Hungary, Spain, Italy and Norway with a strong track-record of collaboration on these issues) accompanied by leading institutes from the USA, Argentina, Singapore, China, Japan, Australia and South Africa to act as hub-and-spokes for their regions.


The coiled thread on a screw is among the 'chiral' structures' whose mirror image is different from the original. When reduced to the nanometer scale, these structures could have an important role in nanosensor technology. However, making a screw out of a straight wire is no small task, even in the macroscopic world. Making it on the nanoscale has previously used bottom-up methods that grow or assemble the structure in a gas or solution. But such approaches can be complicated, slow and expensive. Jun Wei from A*STAR's Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology and co-workers from the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University and Nanjing Tech University in China, developed a simpler method that uses etching techniques to convert a straight nanowire into a screw. The team created 10-micrometer silver nanowires, 80 nanometers in diameter and with five sides. The structures were attached to a silicon substrate and then placed into a solution of silver nitride in ethylene glycol at 80 degrees Celsius for 20 minutes. The sample was then rinsed clean and the process repeated five times. When the resultant wires were imaged using a scanning transmission electron microscope the team observed smooth ridges and grooves reminiscent of screw threads. Interestingly, such a structure was not evident when a single-step etch was used. Etching usually works along specific crystallographic directions, leading to symmetric structures, so the team wanted to know how equivalent crystal facets could be etched in an anisotropic way. They propose that this unusual etching mode might begin with the creation of pits at the boundaries between the five crystallographic regions that make up the pentagonal nanowire. These pits merge at an angle, driven by the propensity to minimize the surface energy, and thus create ridges and grooves that spiral around the nanowire. "This selective etching is driven by a faster etching rate at some defect locations on the silver nanowire," says Wei. "Thus, we can convert a regular structure into non-symmetrical one." Such chiral nanostructures have a much larger surface area than a straight nanowire of similar size. This makes them potentially useful for sensing applications. "We next hope to use the nanoscrews in the fabrication of sensors and transparent conductors," says Wei. The A*STAR-affiliated researchers contributing to this research are from the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology and the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering. More information: Rachel Lee Siew Tan et al. Nanoscrews: Asymmetrical Etching of Silver Nanowires, Journal of the American Chemical Society (2016). DOI: 10.1021/jacs.6b06250


News Article | January 30, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The age of big data has seen a host of new techniques for analyzing large data sets. But before any of those techniques can be applied, the target data has to be aggregated, organized, and cleaned up. That turns out to be a shockingly time-consuming task. In a 2016 survey, 80 data scientists told the company CrowdFlower that, on average, they spent 80 percent of their time collecting and organizing data and only 20 percent analyzing it. An international team of computer scientists hopes to change that, with a new system called Data Civilizer, which automatically finds connections among many different data tables and allows users to perform database-style queries across all of them. The results of the queries can then be saved as new, orderly data sets that may draw information from dozens or even thousands of different tables. “Modern organizations have many thousands of data sets spread across files, spreadsheets, databases, data lakes, and other software systems,” says Sam Madden, an MIT professor of electrical engineering and computer science and faculty director of MIT’s bigdata@CSAIL initiative. “Civilizer helps analysts in these organizations quickly find data sets that contain information that is relevant to them and, more importantly, combine related data sets together to create new, unified data sets that consolidate data of interest for some analysis.” The researchers presented their system last week at the Conference on Innovative Data Systems Research. The lead authors on the paper are Dong Deng and Raul Castro Fernandez, both postdocs at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory; Madden is one of the senior authors. They’re joined by six other researchers from Technical University of Berlin, Nanyang Technological University, the University of Waterloo, and the Qatar Computing Research Institute. Although he’s not a co-author, MIT adjunct professor of electrical engineering and computer science Michael Stonebraker, who in 2014 won the Turing Award — the highest honor in computer science — contributed to the work as well. Data Civilizer assumes that the data it’s consolidating is arranged in tables. As Madden explains, in the database community, there’s a sizable literature on automatically converting data to tabular form, so that wasn’t the focus of the new research. Similarly, while the prototype of the system can extract tabular data from several different types of files, getting it to work with every conceivable spreadsheet or database program was not the researchers’ immediate priority. “That part is engineering,” Madden says. The system begins by analyzing every column of every table at its disposal. First, it produces a statistical summary of the data in each column. For numerical data, that might include a distribution of the frequency with which different values occur; the range of values; and the “cardinality” of the values, or the number of different values the column contains. For textual data, a summary would include a list of the most frequently occurring words in the column and the number of different words. Data Civilizer also keeps a master index of every word occurring in every table and the tables that contain it. Then the system compares all of the column summaries against each other, identifying pairs of columns that appear to have commonalities — similar data ranges, similar sets of words, and the like. It assigns every pair of columns a similarity score and, on that basis, produces a map, rather like a network diagram, that traces out the connections between individual columns and between the tables that contain them. A user can then compose a query and, on the fly, Data Civilizer will traverse the map to find related data. Suppose, for instance, a pharmaceutical company has hundreds of tables that refer to a drug by its brand name, hundreds that refer to its chemical compound, and a handful that use an in-house ID number. Now suppose that the ID number and the brand name never show up in the same table, but there’s at least one table linking the ID number and the chemical compound, and one linking the chemical compound and the brand name. With Data Civilizer, a query on the brand name will also pull up data from tables that use just the ID number. Some of the linkages identified by Data Civilizer may turn out to be spurious. But the user can discard data that don’t fit a query while keeping the rest. Once the data have been pruned, the user can save the results as their own data file. “Data Civilizer is an interesting technology that potentially will help data scientists address an important problem that arises due to the increasing availability of data — identifying which data sets to include in an analysis,” says Iain Wallace, a senior informatics analyst at the drug company Merck. “The larger an organization, the more acute this problem becomes.” “We are currently exploring how to use Civilizer as a harmonization layer on top of a variety of chemical-biology datasets,” Wallace continues. “These datasets typically link compounds, diseases, and targets together. One use case is to identify which table contains information about a specific compound and what additional information is available about that compound in other related datasets. Civilizer helps us by allowing full text search over all the columns and then identifying related columns automatically. By using Civilizer, we should be easily able to add additional data sources and update our analysis very quickly.”


News Article | August 31, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

A little over a kilometre off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula sits a plot of land just 42 kilometres across and 23 kilometres wide. The main island of Singapore is half the size of Los Angeles, with limited natural resources — certainly not enough to cater for its 5 million inhabitants. Faced with global competition in its traditional industries, 25 years ago Singapore began to pursue a future as an Asian research hub, putting science and technology at the centre of its economy. This was an ambitious goal for a country without an established research culture. But driven by necessity, and generous government funding, Singapore has drawn some of the world's leading scientists, science-driven corporations and research institutions to set up labs either alone or in partnership with local universities, businesses and government. In many respects, the country is succeeding in achieving its research and development (R&D) goal. It is home to the two highest-ranked universities in Asia; it has among the strongest industry–university links in the developed world, as determined by the World Economic Forum; it has become a leader in water-processing technology, exporting it to the rest of the world; it is an electronics industry powerhouse, including a centre for superconductor development and manufacturing; and it is rapidly establishing itself as a hotspot for biomedical science. Despite this, some are questioning whether the government money that has poured into science is generating sufficient bounty in terms of jobs and national income to justify the largesse. Singapore's gross domestic product (GDP) hovers at around S$410 billion (US$304 billion). More than S$35 billion has been allocated by the government to foster home-grown science and technology since 2000. Earlier this year the government promised a further S$19 billion between now and 2020 with the slogan “Winning the Future”. Singapore is now one of the bigger spenders on research, with 2.2% of GDP going towards R&D in 2014. But some scientists and funders fear that translation of this research may be happening too slowly and in the wrong parts of the economy to support the continued growth in funding. Although Singapore's multinationals and large local enterprises have done very well, the small- to medium-sized enterprises that employ 70% of the country's workforce, have yet to incorporate R&D into their businesses in a substantial way. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has suggested that this may be because of a national aversion to risk-taking. But science leaders now fear that public support for R&D spending and the country's aspirations to become a science-led economy may be dwindling. “We see science and technology as a very important pillar in our future economic growth,” says Teck Seng Low, head of Singapore's science funding agency, the National Research Foundation (NRF). Moreover, he says, these endeavours are key to “providing us with solution options to our national challenges”. Water scarcity is a continual problem in Singapore. The city-state has no rivers of substantial size and is dependent on importing water from Malaysia. The NRF has invested heavily in water research, and Singapore is now one of the world leaders in the field, particularly when it comes to the development of membranes for reverse osmosis, desalination, filtering and, more recently, for an innovative approach known as forward osmosis. The country hosts 180 companies involved in water management and is home to 28 research centres focused on water. The Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute (NEWRI) was established in 2008 as part of Nanyang Technological University (NTU), with the support of the NRF. NEWRI is one of the world leaders in water research and has been instrumental in the development of forward osmosis. This low-energy osmosis technique uses variations in the concentrations of liquids to draw small molecules such as water through fine membranes, leaving impurities behind. It requires much less energy than reverse osmosis and will potentially be a sustainable and cost-saving technology. As part of a project funded by a S$2.5 million NRF grant, Darco Water Technologies in Singapore and a spin-off from NTU called Aquaporin Asia is piloting the technology for commercial use in industrial wastewater treatment. “We invested heavily in water-related research and today Singapore is self-sufficient and secure in water,” says Low. “Alongside this security we have actually built a very vibrant water industry.” Long-term government initiatives to foster science as part of the economy have been fundamental to the nation's recent successes. In its first five-year National Technology Plan in 1991, the National Science and Technology Board, as it was then known, allocated S$2 billion to R&D. The five-year cycle continues to provide the context in which science, and much of research translation, is done. Today, the NRF administers the five-year plans, determining national research priorities and funding distribution. Given that Singapore has been governed for almost 60 years by the same political party (the People's Action Party), there has been little policy upheaval to threaten the creation of a knowledge ecosystem comprised of top-ranked universities and research institutes and research-intensive industries with global reach. One of the country's research priorities is to become a global player in the biomedical sciences. The drug-development pipeline is one of the longest and most treacherous for translating research into tangible economic outcomes, but Singapore has established itself as a major player. Each year the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) runs about 30 new projects with international pharmaceutical companies. And pharma giants such as Abbott, MSD, Novartis and Pfizer have all set up production facilities in Singapore. In 2015, Chugai Pharmaceutical announced it would invest an additional S$476 million in its research facilities in Singapore. The centrepiece of Singapore's biomedical push is Biopolis, a research hub established in 2003. Biopolis is home to A*STAR's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology. Earlier this year, researchers from the institute, in collaboration with computing giant IBM, described a giant molecule — a hyperbranched amine-based polymer — with the capacity to help immune cells defend against a broad range of viruses, including Ebola, Dengue and Marburg, by rendering the viruses unable to replicate ( et al. Macromolecules 49, 2618–2629; 2016). Although it is early days, the development could be used to protect against these deadly diseases. But even if all goes smoothly, commercial production could be a decade away. This lengthy wait is part of science, but it is slowing down the country's trajectory to a science-led economy. The innate weaknesses of Singapore's economy — a small domestic market, a reliance on international trade, a scarcity of natural resources and a high cost of labour and property in comparison to the rest of Southeast Asia — make science a necessity for future prosperity, says Yuen Ping Ho, associate director of research at the National University of Singapore's Entrepreneurship Centre. “To remain competitive in the face of these constraints, the economy has been moving towards a more knowledge-based structure,” Ho says. “Science and technology is essential in this transition in two ways — doing things better, and doing new things.” But Ho's research shows that the impact of R&D on Singapore's economic growth hasn't been as great as in other members of the OECD ( et al. Singapore Econ. Rev. 54, 1; 2009). Ho attributes this to the country's relatively recent embrace of science investment. Although strong links have been established between researchers and large industry corporations, there are still few partnerships with small to medium enterprises. These companies are the bulk of the country's economy and are where productivity improvements and product disruption could have greatest effect. As NTU president, Bertil Andersson has seen first hand the dramatic effect that the government's science push has had on Singapore's research capacity. The most important development, he says, has been the ability to attract the best talent from around the world and to lift the education standards in schools and universities. It's what he calls the 'brain-gain game'. “Singapore doesn't have a long academic tradition, so science and research is fairly new,” Andersson says. The country wants a return on its investment, a goal that he acknowledges is still a challenge. “I am confident that it will happen, but it may take some time.” But politicians can be impatient. Pointed questions are being asked, says Low. “All of them are asking 'Now that we have invested S$40-odd billion in the last 25 years and S$20 billion in the next 5 years. What can we expect?” Recent figures are encouraging. They show that business expenditure on R&D reached a new high of S$5.2 billion in 2014, up from S$3.9 billion in 2010. The greatest increase came from small- and medium-sized companies, which spent S$800 million. Activity that suggests companies are more willing to take risks. Despite these signs that Singapore's domestic businesses are responding positively to the stimulus of long-term generous government investment in science, Low says that government funding will not continue to increase in the same way it has for the past 25 years. He thinks that as the science ecosystem of Singapore matures, government support will plateau where it is at around 1% of GDP. If the dynamic island at the end of the Malay Peninsula is going to continue its progress towards a science-led economy, private funds will need to fill the gap. “We have this ecosystem in place,” Low says. “But it is what we make of it that will allow us to see some measure of success.”


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and leading cyber security company FireEye are inking a partnership to explore new areas in cyber security research, and to develop courses to meet the rising demand for cyber security professionals needed to help defend critical networks. Besides carrying out joint research projects and developing new curriculum in cybersecurity, the partnership will offer scholarships, and provide internship opportunities to NTU students. The collaboration was signed today at one of the world's largest gathering of information security professionals, the RSA Conference in California, the United States, by NTU's Dean of the College of Science, Professor Ling San, and Kevin Mandia, Chief Executive Officer at FireEye. NTU Provost, Professor Freddy Boey said, "Today, the world is more connected than ever before, from internet banking to critical infrastructure, and this creates new vulnerabilities. NTU's new partnership with FireEye will not only find better ways to address the rising cyber threats, but also groom the next generation of future-ready cybersecurity professionals." The collaboration will focus on efforts to automatically classify malicious software (malware) and to study new methods that attackers use to infiltrate computer systems. This includes developing solutions to identify hidden malware behaviour that could evade regular detection methods. Eric Hoh, President of Asia Pacific Japan at FireEye said, "In the wake of the U.S. presidential election, it is clear that cyber security is the next domain in which national sovereignty will be challenged. This is cause for concern in the Asia Pacific region, where attackers spend a median of 520 days inside organizations before they are discovered. To improve, organizations must apply a combination of technology, threat intelligence, and -- most crucially -- expertise. Southeast Asia faces a shortage of cyber security expertise, and this collaboration will help bolster the ranks of those that defend Singapore networks." Mr David Koh, Chief Executive of the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore said, "This NTU-FireEye partnership brings together the strengths of both academia and industry to offer cutting-edge cybersecurity research as well as robust training to develop cybersecurity talent. It is a welcomed move to ensure we have a pool of skilled manpower with deep cybersecurity capabilities for Singapore." A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last three years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district. FireEye is the intelligence-led security company. Working as a seamless, scalable extension of customer security operations, FireEye offers a single platform that blends innovative security technologies, nation-state grade threat intelligence, and world-renowned Mandiant® consulting. With this approach, FireEye eliminates the complexity and burden of cyber security for organizations struggling to prepare for, prevent, and respond to cyber attacks. FireEye has over 5,600 customers across 67 countries, including more than 40% of the Forbes Global 2000. FireEye and Mandiant are registered trademarks or trademarks of FireEye, Inc. in the United States and other countries. All other brands, products, or service names are or may be trademarks or service marks of their respective owners. This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements related to expectations, beliefs, benefits, plans and objectives with respect to the partnership between Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and FireEye. Readers should not place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which are based upon beliefs and information as of the date of this release. These forward-looking statements are subject to change as a result of new information, future events or other circumstances and are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. In addition, these forward-looking statements are made as of the date hereof and NTU and FireEye specifically disclaim any obligation or intention to update the forward-looking statements to reflect events that occur or circumstances that exist after the date of this release.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

MCLEAN, VA and SINGAPORE--(Marketwired - February 09, 2017) - Smart technologies, such as sensors to improve workplace safety and artificial intelligence to aid courtrooms, could emerge from a new research partnership between Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and The MITRE Corporation from the United States. MITRE is a not-for-profit organization that operates federally funded research and development centers in the U.S., providing the US government with engineering, technical and scientific expertise in areas of defence, aviation, homeland security, U.S. courts, healthcare and cybersecurity. NTU and MITRE signed two research agreements today at MITRE's McLean campus in Virginia, U.S., signed by NTU Provost Professor Freddy Boey and MITRE's Senior Vice President Lillian Zarrelli Ryals. The joint research partnership aims to develop innovative technologies to support Singapore's Smart Nation ambitions and improve safety in workplaces, and in Judicial Engineering, which aims to improve productivity and processes for the Singapore courts. Prof Boey said the tie-up brings Singapore a step closer to achieving its Smart Nation vision as the country develops new technologies to tackle critical challenges such as labour shortfall and a rapidly aging workforce. "This new partnership brings together MITRE's strengths in smart technologies and judiciary engineering with NTU's expertise in systems engineering as well as our track record in sustainable and intelligent technologies," said Prof Boey. "Partnering with the best global players like MITRE for interdisciplinary research is important as NTU continues to develop innovative solutions relevant for Singapore and Asia." MITRE's Senior Vice President Ms Ryals said, "MITRE looks forward to strengthening its relationship with NTU by entering into new research partnerships focused on judicial systems and personnel/workplace safety. NTU's extremely strong technical expertise, combined with MITRE's systems engineering acumen, will aid both organizations in tackling the most difficult global problems in these domains." The partnership between NTU and MITRE will look into area of Judicial Engineering, where NTU researchers will work with Singapore's courts to study how technology can help to improve court operations and to increase the productivity of the courts. New technologies to be explored include artificial intelligence and machine learning, court analytics and decision support systems as well as cybersecurity. The second thrust of the tie-up will be a focus on secure smart technologies such as sensors, diverse data sources, analytic technologies, and decision support tools. These smart technologies aim to improve workplace and personnel safety through providing critical safety information gathered through sensors, analytics and other data sources. For example, smart sensors could gather data on the number of employees in an office building and large installations like the airport and seaport, so as to generate the ideal work environment in terms of oxygen levels, brightness of lighting and ambient temperature based on demand in an area. In the event of an incident such as a fire, the information picked up by the smart sensors could also help fire safety officers ensure the safe evacuation of everyone. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last three years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district. The MITRE Corporation is a private, not-for-profit organization that operates research and development centers for the US government. We provide technical expertise in defense, systems engineering, aviation, cybersecurity, critical infrastructure protection, enterprise modernization, and healthcare. With 70 locations around the world, MITRE collaborates with partner nations, the international community, academia, and research institutions to strengthen national and global security. In 2015, MITRE opened MITRE Asia Pacific Singapore (MAPS), its first international research and development center in Singapore. Learn more at www.mitre-ap.sg


News Article | December 28, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

With Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) or drones gaining popularity globally for commercial, recreational and industry purposes, hundreds of UAVs may soon be buzzing all over Singapore. The lower cost of drones and rising demand for commercial drone services have already led to a boom in the number of drones taking to the skies in Singapore. With Singapore's limited airspace and dense population, the need for an aerial traffic management system to allow drones to fly safely has become more urgent. Researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) are studying ways to allow hundreds of UAVs to fly efficiently and safely at any one time. The aim is to develop a traffic management system for UAVs consisting designated air-lanes and blocks, similar to how cars on the roads have traffic lights and lanes. Advanced technologies that will be developed include smart and safe routing, detect- and-avoid systems, and traffic management to coordinate air traffic. Named Traffic Management of Unmanned Aircraft Systems, this initiative is spearheaded by NTU's Air Traffic Management Research Institute (ATMRI). ATMRI is a joint research centre by NTU and the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). It aims to research and develop air traffic management solutions for Singapore and the Asia Pacific region, including UAV traffic management which is one of its key programmes. Leading the research programme are NTU Professor Low Kin Huat, an expert in robotics and UAVs from the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and ATMRI Senior Research Fellow, Mr Mohamed Faisal Bin Mohamed Salleh. Prof Low said it is important to develop a traffic management solution for UAVs tailored to actual challenges faced by Singapore given the huge growth of UAV traffic expected over the next decade. "At NTU, we have already demonstrated viable technologies such as UAV convoys, formation flying and logistics, which will soon become mainstream," explained Prof Low. "This new traffic management project will test some of the new concepts developed with the aim of achieving safe and efficient drone traffic in our urban airways." "The implications of the project will have far reaching consequences, as we are developing ways for seamless travel of unmanned aircrafts for different purposes without compromising safety, which is of paramount importance." Professor Louis Phee, Chair of NTU's School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said the UAV research at NTU is a natural progression, with the school's deep expertise in autonomous vehicles and robotics developed over the last decade. "This research will pave the way for appropriate rules and regulations to be implemented amidst the rapid growth of UAVs. The findings can help improve safety and address security concerns, which are especially important given today's climate of uncertainty." To ensure that traffic is regulated across the whole of Singapore, a possible solution is the establishment of coordinating stations for UAV traffic. These stations can then track all the UAVs that are in the air, schedule the traffic flow, monitor their speeds and ensure a safe separation between the UAVs. Mr Faisal, the co-investigator of the programme, said various scenarios will be tested out using computer simulations and software to optimise UAV traffic routes, so as to minimise traffic congestions. "We will also look into proposing safety standards, for instance how high UAVs should fly and how far they should be flying above buildings, taking privacy concerns and laws into consideration, and to suggest recommended actions during contingencies," said Mr Faisal, who is also Deputy Director at ATMRI. One proposed strategy is to use the current infrastructure such as open fields for take-off and landing and having UAVs fly above buildings and HDB flats, which can act as emergency landing sites to minimise risk to the public. Currently, restricted airspace and zones where UAV operations are prohibited have already been identified, such as near airports and military facilities. The researchers will test out several concepts, such as geofencing. The idea is to set up virtual fences where UAVs can be automatically routed around a restricted geographical location such as the airport. Another important research area will be collision detection. UAVs will need to have sensors that enable detection and avoidance of collision with another UAV. This will allow UAVs to follow a set of actions to avoid any mid-air incidents, such as flying above, below, or around other UAVs. This multidisciplinary research initiative will bring together faculty and researchers from different fields in NTU, from aerospace engineering and air traffic management to robotics and electronic engineering. Spanning a period of four years, the project which will also tap on industry experts, is expected to complete its initial phase of conceptual design and software simulation by end 2017. This is followed by actual test bedding of solutions using UAVs developed by NTU that can be used for relevant applications in 2018. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last three years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed an ultrafast high-contrast camera that could help self-driving cars and drones see better in extreme road conditions and in bad weather. Unlike typical optical cameras, which can be blinded by bright light and unable to make out details in the dark, NTU's new smart camera can record the slightest movements and objects in real time. The new camera records the changes in light intensity between scenes at nanosecond intervals, much faster than conventional video, and it stores the images in a data format that is many times smaller as well. With a unique in-built circuit, the camera can do an instant analysis of the captured scenes, highlighting important objects and details. Developed by Assistant Professor Chen Shoushun from NTU's School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, the new camera named Celex® is now in its final prototype phase. "Our new camera can be a great safety tool for autonomous vehicles, since it can see very far ahead like optical cameras but without the time lag needed to analyse and process the video feed," explained Asst Prof Chen. "With its continuous tracking feature and instant analysis of a scene, it complements existing optical and laser cameras and can help self-driving vehicles and drones avoid unexpected collisions that usually happens within seconds." Asst Prof Chen unveiled the prototype of Celex® last month at the 2017 IS&T International Symposium on Electronic Imaging (EI 2017) held in the United States. It received positive feedback from the conference attendees, many of whom are academia and top industry players. A typical camera sensor has several millions pixels, which are sensor sites that record light information and are used to form a resulting picture. High-speed video cameras that record up to 120 frames or photos per second generate gigabytes of video data, which are then processed by a computer in order for self-driving vehicles to "see" and analyse their environment. The more complex the environment, the slower the processing of the video data, leading to lag times between "seeing" the environment and the corresponding actions that the self-driving vehicle has to take. To enable an instant processing of visual data, NTU's patent-pending camera records the changes between light intensity of individual pixels at its sensor, which reduces the data output. This avoids the needs to capture the whole scene like a photograph, thus increasing the camera's processing speed. The camera sensor also has a built-in processor that can analyse the flow of data instantly to differentiate between the foreground objects and the background, also known as optical flow computation. This innovation allows self-driving vehicles more time to react to any oncoming vehicles or obstacles. The research into the sensor technology started in 2009 and it has received $500,000 in funding from the Ministry of Education Tier 1 research grant and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Proof-of-Concept grant. The technology was also published in two academic journals published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the world's largest technical professional organisation for the advancement of technology. With keen interest from the industry, Asst Prof Chen and his researchers have spun off a start-up company named Hillhouse Tech to commercialise the new camera technology. The start-up is incubated by NTUitive, NTU's innovation and enterprise company. Asst Prof Chen expects that the new camera will be commercially ready by the end of this year, as they are already in talks with global electronic manufacturers. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes -- the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last three years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

An analysis of the health of highly impacted coral reefs off Singapore during a 27-year long period has shown they are more resilient to the impacts of human activity and warming than expected. A UNSW-led international team found that shallower reefs rebounded rapidly from a major bleaching episode in 1998, despite experiencing such high levels of sedimentation that underwater visibility was typically less than 2 metres. "It is remarkable that diverse shallow coral communities can persist in such adverse conditions," says study first author Dr James Guest, formerly of UNSW and now at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology. "Undoubtedly, Singapore's reefs have suffered as a result of human activities, but the recovery of corals at shallow sites is really surprising given how impacted this environment is. It really shows how tough corals can be." Study senior author UNSW Professor Peter Steinberg adds: "This is by no means a cause for complacency regarding the state of our reefs, but rather highlights that if we can reduce local stressors, reefs are more likely to be able to rebound from the effects of global stressors such as climate change." The study by the team, which includes researchers from UNSW and the Sydney Institute of Marine Science, the National University of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, and Singapore's National Parks Board, is published in the journal Scientific Reports. In the past 200 years, Singapore has been transformed from a forest-covered island with about 150 people to a highly urbanised city-state of more than 5.4 million. Extensive coastal construction, dredge spillage and land reclamation have resulted in high sedimentation rates, turbidity and pollution, putting immense pressure on the surrounding coral reefs. Between 1986 and 2012, coral communities at 15 sites south of the main island were regularly surveyed, and the results have been analysed for the new study. Coral cover during this 27-year period declined at all sites -- by about 12 per cent at the shallower depths of 3-4 metres and by about 30 per cent at the deeper depths of 6-7 metres. There was a particularly large decline in the first decade due in part, the authors suggest, to unmitigated dumping of dredge spoils in the late 1980s. In 1998, a major bleaching event occurred as the result of high water temperatures associated with an El Nino. However, corals at shallower reef sites were remarkably resilient to this event, showing signs of recovery within a decade. By 2008 coral cover had increased to about 1993 levels. Corals at deeper sites were less resilient, with coral cover at these sites continuing to decline. However, none of the sites were overtaken by large fleshy seaweeds, as has been seen on impacted reefs elsewhere in the world. The lack of recovery at deeper sites may be due to low light levels or a lack of unsuitable substratum for new corals to settle and survive. The researchers suspect the resilience at shallow sites is due to an abundance of coral species which have fast regrowth rates and can tolerate environmental stresses such as high levels of suspended sediments. It is also possible the turbidity of the water could offer some protection by reducing the light and the impact of heat stress, as well as slowing down the growth of fleshy seaweeds. Reefs in Singapore appear to have undergone substantial bleaching again this year, which is likely to test whether the resilience to bleaching observed in previous decades is still present on these reefs.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a new material that will make vehicles and buildings cooler and quieter compared to current insulation materials in the market. Known as aerogel composites, this new foam insulates against heat 2.6 times better than conventional insulation foam. When compared to traditional materials used in soundproofing, it can block out 80 per cent of outside noise, 30 per cent more than the usual ones. Made from silica aerogels with a few other additives, this new material is now ready for commercialisation and is expected to hit the market early next year. The promising product has the potential to be used in a wide range of applications, including in building and construction, oil and gas and the automotive industry. The aerogel composites took NTU Assoc Prof Sunil Chandrankant Joshi and his then-PhD student, Dr Mahesh Sachithanadam, four years to develop. The technology had been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patent has been filed by NTU's innovation and enterprise arm NTUitive. A local company, Bronx Creative & Design Center Pte Ltd (BDC), has licensed this aerogel composites technology with a joint venture of S$7 million (USD$5.2 million), and a production plant that will be operational by 2017. It will produce the aerogel composites in various forms such as sheets or panels, in line with current industry sizes. Assoc Prof Sunil said the foam will be easy to install and use as it is thinner than conventional foam yet has better performance. "Our NTU thin foam is also greener to manufacture, as it does not require high heat treatment or toxic materials in its production. It is therefore a lot more eco-friendly and less hazardous to the environment," explained Prof Sunil who is from NTU's School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Mr Thomas Ng, R&D Director of BDC, said this new material could address a real market need for high-performance heat insulation and better sound proofing. "With the global industries moving towards green manufacturing and a lowered carbon footprint, the new foam we produce will help address their needs and yet give a better performance," Mr Ng said. "Moving forward, we hope to show the current market that going green doesn't mean that performance has to be compromised. We will be working with industry partners and certified testing labs to achieve the relevant standards and certifications. "BDC has plans to have a footprint locally as we are now in talks with a few local parties to make this happen, in line with Singapore's vision of being a global leader in the Advanced Manufacturing and Engineering sector," he added. BDC has various negotiations underway with other companies to expand the production to India and various Southeast Asia countries within the next three years. The new aerogel composite has been branded "Bronx AeroSil" by BDC and is being developed for various applications by Dr Mahesh, now the Chief Technology Officer at BDC. For example, to reduce the noise generated by a truck driving by to that of a normal conversation, only 15mm of the new material would be needed. On the other hand, common insulation foam requires a thickness of 25mm. The aerogel composite can reduce noise by as much as 80 per cent whereas normal foam only reduces sound by 50 per cent, explained Dr Mahesh. Against heat, Bronx AeroSil which is 50 per cent thinner than conventional foam will still out-perform it by 37 per cent. "For both heat insulation and sound-proofing, we can now use less material to achieve the same effect, which will also lower the overall material and logistic costs," Dr Mahesh said. Apart from being a good thermal and acoustic insulator, it is also non-flammable - a crucial factor for materials used in high heat environments common in the oil and gas industries. It is also resilient and can withstand high compression or heavy loads. A small 10cm by 10cm piece of the aerogel composite material weighing just 15 grams can take up to 300 kilogrammes of weight, maintaining its shape without being flattened. In the first quarter of next year, BDC will begin mass producing the aerogel composites for their clients, which include companies from the automotive, electronics, and oil and gas sectors. Further research and optimisation would be carried out to improve the performance of the aerogel composite material to ensure it maintains its competitiveness edge against other technologies, said Dr Mahesh. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It has a new medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last two years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) today launched a new marine research laboratory to develop innovative eco-friendly technologies for Singapore's maritime and offshore industry Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) today launched a new marine research laboratory to develop innovative eco-friendly technologies for Singapore's maritime and offshore industry. The Sembcorp Marine Lab at NTU, named in appreciation of a $10 million endowment fund set up by Sembcorp Marine, aims to develop ground-breaking solutions in fuel emission management, energy efficiency, and green shipping. It is equipped with the Southeast Asia's first dual-fuel marine engine, which is supported by the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB). NTU researchers will study ways to retrofit ships to operate using two fuel types simultaneously - one of it being clean fuel - in a bid to reduce harmful emissions while keeping costs low. Such solutions are also aimed at delivering competitive advantages, and help shipping companies better prepare for the stringent emission regulations that will come into effect in 2020. NTU Provost Professor Freddy Boey, said, "A global university with recognised strengths in sustainability research, NTU can play an important role in developing innovative eco-friendly technologies for Singapore's marine and offshore industry. "Our partnership with SembCorp Marine and the Singapore Economic Development Board combines our strengths and creates fresh synergies, allowing the lab to carry out cutting-edge research in fuel emission management, energy efficiency, and green shipping." Mr Tan Kong Hwee, Director for Transport Engineering at the EDB said, "NTU's focus on developing greener marine technologies is testament to the increasing interest in sustainable solutions for the marine and offshore engineering (M&OE) sector. The lab will also demonstrate Singapore's capabilities in industry-relevant M&OE research." The lab was officially opened this morning by Mr Wong Weng Sun, President & Chief Executive Officer, Sembcorp Marine. "With the opening of the Sembcorp Marine Lab @ NTU, the offshore and marine sector now has a new research venue for investigating eco-friendly energy solutions, including clean and renewable fuels for marine engines, and emission control technologies," Mr Wong said. "I am excited about the lab's potential and look forward to a close collaboration between Sembcorp Marine and NTU to drive the R&D activities forward." Overhauling ships to operate entirely on alternative or clean fuels is a costly endeavour as it requires a complete overhaul of the engine systems. To keep costs low, the Sembcorp Marine Lab at NTU will find ways to retrofit and modify ship systems to operate using both diesel and a clean fuel such as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Researchers will also study the emission levels of various clean fuels and the viability of using biofuels such as biodiesel in ship engines. These solutions will provide simpler and cheaper options for ship companies to go green and ensure that ships' emission levels comply with international standards. Professor Lua Aik Chong, Acting Executive Director of Maritime Institute @ NTU and professor-in-charge of the new lab, said, "This lab comes at an important time amid rising energy demands and environmental concerns about carbon emissions and global warming. With international bodies already taking action, the lab will help the industry prepare for the changes, by providing viable and cost effective solutions." The new lab will also serve as a testbed, and work with various industry partners and government agencies such as the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) on maritime-related research projects. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It has a new medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last two years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Two scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) are the first from Singapore awarded the Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water (PSIPW). Established in 2002, the biennial award from Saudi Arabia recognises top innovative scientific research around the world that alleviates the global problem of water scarcity. Professor Wang Rong and Professor Anthony Fane from NTU Singapore are recipients of the Alternative Water Resources Prize, one of the five prizes under PSIPW. The award recognises the work done by the NTU team led by Prof Wang who developed a novel thin film composite hollow fibre membrane with superior performance. It can reduce membrane fouling and scaling, thus less energy is needed in the water reclamation and recycling process. This breakthrough combines forward osmosis, an emerging membrane process for water treatment, with existing technologies such as reverse osmosis, a process commonly used in seawater desalination, to create novel hybrid membrane systems for a wide range of applications. An improved version of the membrane was recently identified by PUB, Singapore's National Water Agency, as one of the research projects with commercial potential. The public agency is encouraging industry partners to collaborate with the NTU team to commercialise the membranes, with support from research funds administered by PUB. The new membrane technology is also in trials with industry partners for the treatment of processed water in the oil and gas industry as well as for application in the food and beverage industry. At the awards ceremony held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on 2 Nov (Singapore's time 3 Nov), Professor Wang received the prize from PSIPW Chairman H.R.H. Prince Khaled Bin Sultan Bin Abdulaziz and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who presided over the event. Professor Wang, the Chair of NTU's School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, said, "The spirit behind the Alternative Water Resources Prize is on innovation and the nurturing of young talent. No one technology can always remain relevant in the light of ever-changing demographics, economics and climate. It is only through developing the competencies of young researchers and investing in the next generation of water scientists and engineers that we can continuously create innovative technologies for our future water security." Professor Wang is also Director of the Singapore Membrane Technology Centre (SMTC), a research centre under NTU's Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI). Professor Fane, Founding Director of SMTC and now a Visiting Professor at NTU said, "I am very honoured to share the prestigious PSIPW Alternative Water Resources prize with my colleague Professor Wang Rong. We have both worked very hard, with our team, to build up the Singapore Membrane Technology Centre at NTU's NEWRI to be a global leader in membranes and sustainable water. This prize is a great recognition of these efforts." The Alternative Water Resources Prize awards a cash prize of US$133,000 (S$185,000) and covers research relating to areas such as wastewater treatment, water purification and cloud seeding. This year the prize received 32 nominations from more than 20 countries. Professor Wang has over 20 patents for novel membrane fabrication. She is the Editor of the Journal of Membrane Science, a top journal on membranes. She is also the founding President of the Membrane Society in Singapore. Professor Fane was the founding director of the Singapore Membrane Technology Centre. He took on subsequent roles as SMTC's Co-Director and Director-Mentor. He is also a former member of the World Health Organisation's Desalination Guidelines steering committee. Both Professor Wang and Professor Fane have been named by research and advisory firm Lux Research to be among the top 25 leading water researchers globally. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It has a new medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last two years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district.


SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Black Hat, the world's leading provider of information security events, today announced initiatives to make the very latest information security research available to Singapore university and polytechnic institutions, as well as the region's larger InfoSec community. The event will offer complimentary access to qualified higher education professors and students in support of objectives outlined in the Singapore government's cybersecurity strategy. Black Hat Asia will take place March 28 -- March 31, 2017 at the Marina Bay Sands in Singapore. For more information and to register, please visit: blackhat.com/asia-17/ "Black Hat continues to serve as a platform for the most valuable and timely research available," said Jeff Moss (aka The Dark Tangent), Founder of Black Hat and DEF CON Conferences. "As Singapore works to raise awareness on the importance of cybersecurity in the region, we want to support this initiative by making Black Hat's rich education available to future InfoSec professionals through Singapore's academia and university students." In response to Singapore government initiatives and trends, Black Hat has created programs to help educate Singapore's InfoSec community and highlight vulnerabilities that affect the region today. The event will bring together today's leading solution providers, educators and students, for unparalleled networking and educational opportunities essential to Singapore's continued focus on InfoSec as a strategic priority. By offering these opportunities in one centralized place, Black Hat Asia will help the Singapore InfoSec community move toward the goals outlined in Singapore's cybersecurity strategy and inspire further innovation and advancements. "It is important to make students aware of and train in the field of computer security, be it cybersecurity or IoT security," said Dr. Sinha Sharad, research scientist, School of Computer Science and Engineering at Nanyang Technological University. "Black Hat is raising the bar by announcing scholarship programs for both students and educators. This integration will benefit universities, the security industry and even educators, as they incorporate the latest ideas and methods into their curriculum, pedagogy and research." To apply for an Educator Scholarship, please visit: blackhat.com/asia-17/educator-scholarship.html To view the current Briefings lineup, including recently announced talks, please visit: blackhat.com/asia-17/briefings/schedule/index.html To view the current list of Trainings classes and to register, please visit: blackhat.com/asia-17/training/index.html Top sponsors of Black Hat Asia 2017 include Diamond Sponsors: Qualys and Tenable Network Security; Platinum Sponsors: CrowdStrike, Cylance and SentinelOne; and Gold Sponsors: Malwarebytes, NTT Security, Rapid7 and Solida Systems. For more information on sponsorship opportunities and to see the full list of participating companies, visit: blackhat.com/asia-17/sponsors.html. About Black Hat For 20 years, Black Hat has provided attendees with the very latest in information security research, development, and trends. These high-profile global events and trainings are driven by the needs of the security community, striving to bring together the best minds in the industry. Black Hat inspires professionals at all career levels, encouraging growth and collaboration among academia, world-class researchers, and leaders in the public and private sectors. Black Hat Briefings and Trainings are held annually in the United States, Europe and Asia. More information is available at: blackhat.com. Black Hat is organized by UBM plc. UBM is the largest pure-play B2B Events organizer in the world. Our 3,750+ people, based in more than 20 countries, serve more than 50 different sectors. Our deep knowledge and passion for these sectors allow us to create valuable experiences which enable our customers to succeed. Please visit www.ubm.com for the latest news and information about UBM.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a new ultrasound device that produces sharper images through 3-D printed lenses Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a new ultrasound device that produces sharper images through 3D printed lenses. With clearer images, doctors and surgeons can have greater control and precision when performing non-invasive diagnostic procedures and medical surgeries. The new device will allow for more accurate medical procedures that involve the use of ultrasound to kill tumours, loosen blood clots and deliver drugs into targeted cells. This innovative ultrasound device is equipped with superior resin lenses that have been 3D printed. In current ultrasound machines, the lens which focuses the ultrasound waves are limited to cylindrical or spherical shapes, restricting the clarity of the imaging. With 3D printing, complex lens shapes can be made which results in sharper images. The 3D printed lenses allow ultrasound waves to be focussed at multiple sites or shape the focus specially to a target, which current ultrasound machines are unable to do. The novel ultrasound device was developed by a multidisciplinary team of scientists, led by Associate Professor Claus-Dieter Ohl from NTU's School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. The ultrasound device had undergone rigorous testing and the findings have been published in Applied Physics Letters, a peer-reviewed journal by a leading global scientific institute - the American Institute of Physics. With this breakthrough, the NTU team is now in talks with various industry and healthcare partners who are looking at developing prototypes for medical and research applications. Associate Professor Claus-Dieter Ohl said, "In most medical surgeries, precision and non-invasive diagnosis methods are crucial. This novel device not only determines the focus of the wave but also its shape, granting greater accuracy and control to medical practitioners." Ultrasound waves are produced by firing sound waves at a glass surface or 'lens' to create high-frequency vibrations. In conventional ultrasound machines, the resulting heat causes the lens to expand rapidly, generating high frequency vibrations that produce ultrasound waves. With lenses that are 3D printed, the new ultrasound device overcomes the limitations of glass. Customised and complex 3D printed lenses can be made for different targets which not only results in better imaging, but are cheaper and easier to produce. "3D printing reinvents the manufacturing process, enabling the creation of unique and complex devices. In turn, the way medical devices are created needs to be rethought. This is an exciting discovery for the scientific community as it opens new doors for research and medical surgery," said Assoc Prof Ohl. This breakthrough taps into an ultrasound market which is expected to grow to about US$ 6.9 billion by 2020. It is also expected to promote new medical techniques and research opportunities in health sciences such as surgery, and biotechnology. For example, researchers could use the sound waves to measure elastic properties of cells in a petri dish, seeing how they respond to forces. This will be useful for example, to distinguish between harmful and benign tumour cells. "This is a very promising breakthrough, potentially offering significant clinical benefits including to the field of cancer imaging. This technology has the potential to reduce image distortions and more accurately differentiate cancerous from non-cancerous soft tissue," said Adjunct Assistant Professor Tan Cher Heng, LKCMedicine Lead for Anatomy & Radiology and Senior Consultant with the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at Tan Tock Seng Hospital. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It has a new medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last two years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SINGAPORE--(Marketwired - Feb 14, 2017) - The highly acclaimed Milipol Asia-Pacific Conference, returns this year from 4 to 6 April 2017 at the Sands Expo and Convention Centre, with a world class line-up of international speakers who will be sharing their latest insights on the homeland security environment. Themed "Emerging Threats -- The Case for Collaborative Public Safety", the three-day conference will expound on how governments and private organisations can build an effective internal and cross-border collaborative approach in tackling emerging threats to homeland security. "In current times where the threats are ever present, solutions to national security have been evolving and developing in new ways. Public and private collaborations are no longer an option but a necessity," commented Mr. Andrew Marriott, Managing Director of Comexposium Singapore. "Through Milipol Asia-Pacific 2017, we hope that attendees will not only have a better understanding of current key challenges, but also familiarise themselves with the roles that individuals can play in the areas of emergency preparedness, prevention, and recovery." Through keynotes and interactive panels, the insightful three-day conference programme will include presentations on three important areas of ensuring national security, specifically, "Threats and Responses", "Protection and Emergency Management", and "Innovation in Tactics and Equipment". Speaker Highlights  Leading International industry experts from Southeast Asia, Europe, Middle East, and the US form the line-up of conference speakers for the upcoming Milipol Asia-Pacific 2017. Together, they will be discussing on emerging regional threats, as well as the ways to mitigate, prevent and react to them. Notable speakers who were directly involved with the critical response to recent emergencies caused by acts of terrorism and conflict in countries like France, Libya, Syria, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Myanmar, Pakistan, India and Bangladesh will share their first-hand experiences, and how in the face of emerging and fast evolving threats, a complex landscape makes it necessary for the community to remain vigilant. Day-1 Threats and Responses     Back at this year's Milipol Asia-Pacific 2017, International Terrorism Expert, Dr Rohan GUNARATNA, Head of International Centre for Political Violence and Terrorism Research (ICPVTR), and Professor of Security Studies at S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, will update delegates on the current and emerging threats in the Asia-Pacific region. For the first time in Asia, hear from the words of key people involved in the Paris attacks as well as lessons learnt, from speakers such as Chief Superintendent Eric GIGOU, Deputy Head of the French Police Special Forces anti-terrorism unit, and Chief Superintendent Dimitri KALININE, Central Commissioner of the 3rd Arrondissement and head of the Night Service Anti-Criminality Brigade, Paris Prefecture of Police, France. Day-2 Protection and Emergency Management       Learn the evolving roles and workings of Counter-Terrorism Intelligence in regional security from Datuk Ayob KHAN Bin Mydin Pitchay, head of the Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM) counter-terrorism division. Further anticipated highlights not to be missed is the exclusive session by James LE MESURIER, director of the Syria Civil Defence support programme. The White Helmets as they are known as credited with saving more than 80,000 lives amidst the ongoing crisis in Syria. In addition to introducing the Developments in Civil Protection in Syria, he will also be sharing some of his extraordinary experiences on the ground since 2012. Day-3 Innovation in Tactics and Equipment     Other panellists include, Director-General Dr Rakesh MARIA, who will discuss the latest intelligence and analytics involved in counter-terrorism intelligence, and Deputy Inspector General (Chief) Monirul ISLAM from Bangladesh. In his first conference stage appearance in Southeast Asia, the man behind the creation of Dhaka Metropolitan Police's special CounterTerrorism Unit will lead us through the dark but real issue of The Evolving Terrorist Mind set. With over 400 attendees from more than 30 countries expected, the region's flagship homeland security conference supported by the Ministry of Home Affairs, Singapore and the Ministry of the Interior of France is the premier event for all Trade and Professional Security Practitioners to attend. Workshops  In addition to the highlights of the main conference programme, there will also be a series of events taking place concurrently on site, as part of the Milipol Asia-Pacific exhibition. This includes the Drone Asia 2017 conference (5 April), Securex-Asia 2017 (5 & 6 April), and the IED Workshop 2017 (6 April). For more information and to register for the conference, please visit http://www.milipolasiapacific.com/conference/overview/speakers Some listed are exclusively speaking at the conference for the first-time in Asia, the speaker line-up of leading practitioners and industry experts includes: Ali SOUFAN   Chairman & President, The Soufan Group, USA  A former FBI Supervisory Special Agent who investigated and supervised highly sensitive and complex international terrorism cases, including the East Africa Embassy Bombings, the attack on the USS Cole, and the events surrounding 9/11 Active Shooters and the Need for an Inter-Agency Response (Bataclan Case)   Eric GIGOU   Deputy Head, Anti-Terrorism Unit, Police Special Forces, France    Recherche, Assistance, Intervention, Dissuasion (RAID), France Hervé TOURMENTE   Deputy Director, Directorate General of Civil Security and Crisis Management, France  Direction Général de la Sécurité Civile et de la Gestion des Crises (DGSCGC), France The Evolution in Civil Protection   James LE MESURIER    Founder & Director, Mayday Rescue Foundation, The Netherlands Mr Le Mesurier is the architect of the Nobel Peace Prize nominated Syria Civil Defence (aka The White Helmets), credited with saving more than 80,000 lives amidst the ongoing crisis in Syria Current and Emerging Threats in the Asia-Pacific    Dr Rohan GUNARATNA   Head of International Centre for Political Violence and Terrorism Research (ICPVTR), Singapore Professor of Security Studies, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), Nanyang Technology University, Singapore The Evolving Terrorist Mindset (Dhaka Suicide Bombers Case and the Suppression of IS Penetration in Bangladesh)  Director Inspector General Monirul ISLAM  Deputy Inspector General (Chief), Counter-Terrorism and Transnational Crime Unit (CTTC) Dhaka Metropolitan Police (DMP), Bangladesh *Programme may be subjected to changes. About Milipol Asia-Pacific    In 2015 the GIE Milipol, Comexposium and GSA Exhibitions Pte Ltd announced the partnership between Global Security Asia and the Milipol Events. After the 2015 edition of the Global Security Asia exhibition and conference, the event was renamed Milipol Asia Pacific, so creating the world's leading international network of exhibitions dedicated to solutions, technologies and innovations for homeland security. For over 30 years, the MILIPOL brand has been synonymous with the highest quality, international events focused on Homeland Security. Over the years, the brand has proudly presented Milipol Paris and Milipol Qatar.


Home > Press > NTU scientists invent bubble technology which can shoot drugs deep into tumors: Using ultrasound, drug particles can be directed to a specific area Abstract: Scientists at Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) have invented a new way to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells. The NTU scientists create micro-sized gas bubbles coated with cancer drug particles and iron oxide nanoparticles, and then use magnets to direct these bubbles to gather around a specific tumour. Ultrasound is then used to vibrate the microbubbles, providing the energy to direct the drug particles into a targeted area. This innovative technique was developed by a multidisciplinary team of scientists, led by Asst Prof Xu Chenjie from the School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and Assoc Prof Claus-Dieter Ohl from the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. NTU's microbubbles were successfully tested in mice and the study has been published by the Nature Publishing Group in Asia Materials, the top journal for materials sciences in the Asia-Pacific region. Overcoming limitations of chemotherapy Asst Prof Xu, who is also a researcher at the NTU-Northwestern Institute for Nanomedicine, said their new method may solve some of the most pressing problems faced in chemotherapy used to treat cancer. The main issue is that current chemotherapy drugs are largely non-targeted. The drug particles flow in the bloodstream, damaging both healthy and cancerous cells. Typically, these drugs are flushed away quickly in organs such as the lungs and liver, limiting their effectiveness. The remaining drugs are also unable to penetrate deep into the core of the tumour, leaving some cancer cells alive, which could lead to a resurgence in tumour growth. "The first unique characteristic of our microbubbles is that they are magnetic. After injecting them into the bloodstream, we are able to gather them around the tumour using magnets and ensure that they don't kill the healthy cells," explains Asst Prof Xu, who has been working on cancer diagnosis and drug delivery systems since 2004. "More importantly, our invention is the first of its kind that allows drug particles to be directed deep into a tumour in a few milliseconds. They can penetrate a depth of 50 cell layers or more - which is about 200 micrometres, twice the width of a human hair. This helps to ensure that the drugs can reach the cancer cells on the surface and also inside the core of the tumour." Clinical Associate Professor Chia Sing Joo, a Senior Consultant at the Tan Tock Seng Hospital's Endoscopy Centre and the Urology & Continence Clinic, was one of the consultants for this study. A trained robotic surgeon experienced in the treatment of prostate, bladder and kidney cancer, Assoc Prof Chia said, "For anticancer drugs to achieve their best effectiveness, they need to penetrate into the tumour efficiently in order to reach the cystoplasm of all the cancer cells that are being targeted without affecting the normal cells. "Currently, these can be achieved by means of a direct injection into the tumour or by administering a large dosage of anticancer drugs, which can be painful, expensive, impractical and might have various side effects." The specialist in Uro-oncology added that if NTU's technology proves to be viable, clinicians might be able to localise and concentrate the anticancer drugs around a tumour, and introduce the drugs deep into tumour tissues in just a few seconds using a clinical ultrasound system. "If successful, I envisage it can be a good alternative treatment in the future, one which is low cost and yet effective for the treatment of cancers involving solid tumours, as it might minimise the side effects of drugs." New drug delivery system The motivation for this research project is to find alternative solutions for drug delivery systems that are non-invasive and safe. Ultrasound uses soundwaves with frequencies higher than those heard by the human ear. It is commonly used for medical imaging such as to get diagnostic images. Magnets, which can draw and attract the microbubbles, are already in use in diagnostic machines such the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). "We are looking at developing novel drug carriers - essentially better ways of delivering drugs with minimum side effects," explained Prof Ohl, an expert in biophysics who had published previous studies involving drug delivery systems and bubble dynamics. "Most prototype drug delivery systems on the market face three main challenges before they can be commercially successful: they have to be non-invasive, patient-friendly and yet cost-effective. "Using the theory of microbubbles and how their surface vibrates under ultrasound, we were able to come up with our solution that addresses these three challenges." Interdisciplinary team This study, which took two and a half years, involved a 12-man international interdisciplinary team consisting of NTU scientists as well as scientists from City University of Hong Kong and Tel Aviv University in Israel. Two NTU undergraduates doing their Final Year Project and one student in Summer Research Internship Programme (NTU) were also part of the team. Moving forward, the team will be adopting this new drug delivery system in studies on lung and liver cancer using animal models, and eventually clinical studies. They estimate that it will take another eight to ten years before it reaches human clinical trials. About Nanyang Technological University A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It has a new medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last two years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


Aravindan V.,Nanyang Technological University | Gnanaraj J.,Yardney Technical Products, Inc. | Lee Y.-S.,Chonnam National University | Madhavi S.,Nanyang Technological University
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2014

Apart from the mentioned applications, wind power generation, uninterruptible power sources, voltage sag compensation, photovoltaic power generation, CT and MRI scanners, and energy recovery systems in industrial machineries are worth mentioning. Carbonaceous materials are favored as EDLC components due to their high specific surface area, relatively low cost, chemical stability in solutions irrespective of the pH value, ease of synthesis protocols with tailored pore size distribution and its amphoteric nature that allows rich electrochemical properties from donor to acceptor state, and a wide range of operating temperatures. The combination reactions enable one to achieve higher energy density and specific capacitance than the EDLC counterpart. Conducting polymers and transition metal oxides are the perfect examples for pseudocapacitive materials.


Wu H.B.,Nanyang Technological University | Pang H.,Anyang University, China | Pang H.,Nanyang Technological University | Lou X.W.,Nanyang Technological University
Energy and Environmental Science | Year: 2013

In this work, we report the facile synthesis of mesoporous nickel cobalt oxide (Ni0.3Co2.7O4) hierarchical structures with excellent supercapacitive performance. Nickel cobalt oxalate hydrate (Ni0.1Co0.9C2O4·nH 2O) is first synthesized as the precursor via a facile precipitation method, followed by controlled annealing to obtain mesoporous Ni 0.3Co2.7O4 hierarchical structures. The sample prepared at a relatively low annealing temperature (400 °C) possesses more abundant mesopores and higher specific surface area, and exhibits excellent supercapacitive performance in aqueous alkaline electrolytes. An exceptionally high specific capacitance of 960 and 805 F g-1 is obtained under current densities of 0.625 and 6.25 A g-1, respectively, with excellent cyclic stability. The remarkable electrochemical performance is attributed to the desirable composition and the unique hierarchical mesoporous architectures. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Song J.,Nanyang Technological University | Guo F.,Shanghai JiaoTong University
Thin-Walled Structures | Year: 2013

The collapse of thin-walled tubes under axial and oblique loading is frequently encountered in real crash events. The windowing and multi-cell methods are effective in improving tubes' energy absorbing performance. In this paper, a comparative study on the performance of windowed and multi-cell square tubes of the same weight under axial and oblique loading is conducted numerically. The results show that the multi-cell tube can achieve higher mean crushing force than the windowed tube but the windowed tube has lower initial peak force. The effectiveness of both methods reduces as the load angle increases. Moreover, the multi-cell and windowed tubes may have worse performance than the conventional tube if the former two collapse in global bending and the later in axial mode. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Niu Z.,Nanyang Technological University | Chen J.,University of Wollongong | Hng H.H.,Nanyang Technological University | Ma J.,Nanyang Technological University | Chen X.,Nanyang Technological University
Advanced Materials | Year: 2012

Making graphene "bread": A leavening strategy - involving hydrazine vapor - is used to prepare reduced graphene oxide (rGO) foams with porous and continuously cross-linked structures from freestanding compact GO layered films. Such rGO foams perform excellently as flexible electrode materials for supercapacitors and selective organic absorbents. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A new study finds that, under the right conditions, 2 1/2-year-old children can answer questions about people acting on false beliefs, an ability that most researchers believe does not develop until age 4. The results are reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "Having the ability to represent false beliefs means recognizing that others can have different thoughts from us," said Peipei Setoh, who, as a graduate student, conducted the study with University of Illinois psychology professor Renée Baillargeon and fellow graduate student Rose Scott. Setoh is now a professor at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Young children's understanding of others' false beliefs is at the heart of a debate among psychologists trying to explain years of inconsistent findings. Some think that false-belief understanding develops at age 4, when children can answer direct questions about it. Others, including Baillargeon, believe the tests psychologists traditionally use are too difficult for young children to successfully demonstrate their understanding of how others view the world. "The field is very divided and we are trying to reconcile all of the evidence," Baillargeon said. In the study, she and her colleagues found that 30- and 33-month-old toddlers were able to successfully demonstrate false-belief understanding using a modified version of a well-known test. Called the Sally-Anne test, the experiment evaluates a child's expectations of how someone will act based on that person's false beliefs. If Sally hides a toy in a basket before she leaves the room, when she returns she expects the toy to be where she left it, in the basket. If her friend Anne moves the toy from the basket to a box while Sally is away, Sally will still think the toy is in the basket when she returns. Someone observing this scene will expect Sally to act on that false belief. When directly asked about the expected location in this test, 4-year-old children are able to correctly identify the basket. However, younger children respond with the actual, and not the expected, location of the toy. Baillargeon's previous research shows that children's nonverbal behavior - for example, looking longer when something unexpected happens - confirms that they understand others' false beliefs, even though the children are unable to verbally convey it in the traditional test. She hypothesizes that toddlers fail at traditional false-belief understanding tests because the test design overwhelms their ability to pay attention and respond appropriately. To address this flaw, she developed a simpler version of the Sally-Anne test, in which she uses a character named Emma. In the traditional task, when asked the direct question about where Sally will look for her toy, young children struggle to suppress information they have about the actual versus expected location. In Baillargeon's new version of the test, Emma's toy is moved to an unknown location completely out of the scene. "It's much easier to inhibit or suppress that response when you don't know where the toy actually is," Baillargeon said. The new approach also gives children a chance to prepare for the test question by giving them two practice questions. With these modifications to the test, both 30- and 33-month-old toddlers are able to tell researchers where Emma will look for the object, verbally demonstrating their understanding that Emma has a false belief about the object's location. Baillargeon and her colleagues found that 33-month-old toddlers, but not 30-month-olds, were able to answer correctly when given two practice trials that were different from the test trial. Receiving only one practice trial foiled all of the toddlers however, as did having the object moved to another hiding location in the scene and not taken away. "What we are showing is that a little bit of practice goes a long way," Baillargeon said. Other researchers have reported that children with more exposure to talking about other's mental states - including children with more siblings, or better language ability - perform better on the traditional Sally-Anne task. "Practice will increase the range of tasks where you can show false-belief understanding, because you won't be taken so much by surprise with the question," she said. With her ongoing research, Baillargeon hopes to identify the necessary conditions for young children to succeed at more difficult versions of false-belief tests. The paper, "Two-and-a-half-year-olds succeed at a traditional false-belief task with reduced processing demands" is available online and from the U of I. News Bureau.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

EXTON, Pa., Nov. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Analytical Graphics, Inc. (AGI) has entered into an agreement with the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and its Air Traffic Management Research Institute (ATMRI) to assist in the development of a UAS Traffic Management...


A new Cochrane Review, summarizing data from 132 trials of automated telephone systems in preventing and managing long-term health conditions, concludes that they probably have the potential to play an important role in the delivery of health care. However, further research is needed to understand more about their acceptability and costs. Automated telephone communication systems (ATCS) send voice messages to patients and may collect health information from people using their telephone's touch-tone keypad or voice-recognition software. Some ATCS also use SMS or email messaging and allow patients to ask for advice or support ('ATCS Plus'). Their use in healthcare is intended to support patients in actively managing their own health. A team of Cochrane researchers assessed the effects of automated telephone communication systems compared with usual care for improving patient care in a variety of ways. These ranged from helping people take their medication as prescribed and reminding them about appointments, to using ACTS to increase the uptake of preventive healthcare measures such as immunization and cancer screening, and to improve the management of long-term conditions such as cancer, chronic pain, diabetes and mental illness. The researchers included 132 trials, most of which were conducted in high income countries across Europe and North America. The studies compared ATCS against standard forms of usual care (i.e. no ATCS intervention). Forty-one studies evaluated ATCS as a way of delivering preventative healthcare, by using reminders about attending appointments to receive immunizations or to get screened for different types of disease. Fives studies involving over 15,000 children and adolescents showed that providing reminders via ACTS probably increases immunization uptake compared with no reminder. When automated phone communication was used alongside other prompts such as mailed reminders the researchers found high quality evidence that this approach increases breast screening attendance by 20% in two studies in 462 women, and colorectal cancer screening by 30% based on three studies in 1013 people compared with usual care. The Cochrane Review found low quality evidence that when compared with no reminders, simple automated systems may improve appointment attendance, which can play a key role in preventing disease. Eighty-four studies evaluated ATCS in people with long-term conditions and whilst there was an indication that different types of ATCS helped to improve adherence with medicines, the effects on clinical outcomes were often mixed. The Review found low quality evidence in 1246 people with diabetes that blood glucose levels were slightly lower in treatment groups who received ATCS that had an interactive component, and moderate quality evidence that this approach helped people to monitor the health of their feet. ATCS with an interactive component probably reduces pain and depression in cancer patients when compared with ATCS alone. The effects on smoking cessation were uncertain, and there appeared to be little or no benefit in reducing blood pressure in people with hypertension. The studies did not report adverse effects of the interventions and the researchers recommend that future research addresses issues of harms, feasibility and cost. The Review's lead author, Josip Car, Director of Centre for Population Health Sciences, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, said these findings are promising and help to identify areas worth pursuing, "Our results show that ATCS may improve health-related outcomes in some long-term health conditions. These systems may also be a useful component in interventions for targeting adherence to medications, physical activity, and weight management and some outcomes in people with diabetes. However, the effects of ATCS are more uncertain in other areas such as HIV/ AIDS, hypertension, mental health, obstructive sleep apnoea or helping people to stop smoking." He added, "Our Review shows that automated telephone communication systems may help change patients' health behaviours when compared with routine care. This is a positive step forward in eHealth for global health research. We need more information about the costs and harms to supplement the evidence that shows potential benefits of using these systems. Further research will help us to understand the patient experience with using these telecommunications systems, and how they could replace or supplement telephone contact between health professionals and patients in the future." Full Citation: Posadzki P, Mastellos N, Ryan R, Gunn LH, Felix LM, Pappas Y, Gagnon MP, Julious SA, Xiang L, Oldenburg B, Car J.Automated telephone communication systems for preventive healthcare and management of long-term conditions.Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2016, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD009921.DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009921.pub2. Lead Author: Associate Professor Josip Car, MD PhD DIC MSc FFPH FRCP (Edin), Director of Centre for Population Health Sciences, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 3 Fusionopolis Link, #03-08, Nexus@one-north, Singapore 138543, Singapore, and Director, Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London, Charing Cross Campus, The Reynolds Building, St Dunstan's Road, London, W6 8RP. For all media enquiries, please contact: Jo Anthony Senior Media and Communications Officer, Cochrane M +44(0) 7582 726 634 E janthony@cochrane.org or pressoffice@cochrane.org Cochrane is a global independent network of researchers, professionals, patients, carers and people interested in health. Cochrane produces reviews which study all of the best available evidence generated through research and make it easier to inform decisions about health. These are called systematic reviews. Cochrane is a not-for profit organisation with collaborators from more than 120 countries working together to produce credible, accessible health information that is free from commercial sponsorship and other conflicts of interest. Our work is recognised as representing an international gold standard for high quality, trusted information. Find out more at cochrane.org Follow us on twitter @cochranecollab If you are a journalist or member of the press and wish to receive news alerts before their online publication or if you wish to arrange an interview with an author, please contact the Cochrane press office: pressoffice@cochrane.org Wiley, a global company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www. .


-- Das International Phenome Centre Network (IPCN), das sich aus führenden internationalen Forschungsinstitutionen zusammensetzt, arbeitet an der Transformation der Gesundheitsversorgung durch die Phänomik – die dynamischen Interaktionen zwischen unseren Genen und unserer Umwelt. -- Phänomik kann Fortschritte in der Präzisionsmedizin erreichen, indem tiefergehende Erkenntnisse über Erkrankungen von weltweiter Tragweite gewonnen werden, unter anderem über Autismus, Krebs, psychische Erkrankungen, Schlaganfall, Adipositas, Stoffwechselkrankheiten und Diabetes Typ 2. -- Das IPCN, das vom MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre am Imperial College London initiiert wurde, führt mehr als ein Dutzend internationale Partner mit regionalen, institutionsübergreifenden Zentren in Australien, Kanada, China, Japan, Singapur, Taiwan, den Vereinigten Staaten und dem Vereinigten Königreich zusammen. DOHA, Katar, 30. November 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Heute ist ein neues internationales Netzwerk lanciert worden, das führende Forschungszentren aus der ganzen Welt verbindet, um auf einige der drängendsten globalen Herausforderungen unserer Zeit im Bereich Gesundheit zu reagieren, beispielsweise hinsichtlich Autismus, Krebs, Diabetes und Demenz. Das International Phenome Centre Network (IPCN) wird die weltweiten Forschungskapazitäten im Bereich Phänomik deutlich steigern. Durch umfassende Analysen von biologischen Flüssigkeiten und Gewebeproben untersucht die Phänomik, wie unsere Lebensgewohnheiten und die Umwelt, der wir ausgesetzt sind, mit unseren Genen interagieren. Die Phänomik kann dazu beitragen, Erklärungen zu liefern, warum einige Menschen Krankheiten entwickeln und andere nicht. Das Netzwerk wurde während einer besonderen Präsentation auf dem World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) in Doha, Katar, gestartet. Es ist allgemein anerkannt, dass die Gene des Menschen als Erklärung nicht ausreichen, wie sich eine Krankheit entwickelt, und dass man die Prävention, Erkennung und Behandlung von Erkrankungen verbessern kann, wenn man die dynamischen Interaktionen zwischen unseren Genen, den Umweltbedingungen, Mikrobiomen, Ernährungsweisen und Lebensstilen und deren Ausprägung bei verschiedenen Individuen und Populationen versteht. Die Mission des IPCN lautet, tiefergehende Erkenntnisse darüber zu gewinnen, wie sich die Variation bei Gen-Umwelt-Interaktionen auf Krankheiten über die Lebensspanne für verschiedenen Populationen hinweg auswirkt. Durch den Einsatz von verlässlichen und abgeglichenen Datensätzen, die die diversen Populationen der Welt repräsentieren, wird diese Forschung Informationen für die globale öffentliche Gesundheitspolitik und die Entwicklung neuer Therapien bereitstellen. „Die Welt steht vor einem nie dagewesenen Zusammenspiel aus Umwelt- und Lebensstil-Faktoren, die das Risiko von chronischen Erkrankungen drastisch erhöhen, und die größten Herausforderungen für die öffentliche Gesundheit darstellen, die man in unserer modernen Zeit je gesehen hat. Das International Phenome Centre Network baut derzeit international aufeinander abgestimmte Zentren für Analytik auf, die sich auf die Erkenntnisgewinnung über diese Gen-Umwelt-Interaktionen konzentrieren, um die Informationen über das Erkrankungsrisiko und die komparative Biologie gravierender Krankheiten zu untermauern und um auf einen bisher unerfüllten Bedarf im Bereich Gesundheit und Medizin zu reagieren", sagte Professor Jeremy Nicholson, Direktor des MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre (NPC) und Leiter der Abteilung für Chirurgie und Krebserkrankungen am Imperial College London. Das IPCN, ins Leben gerufen vom NPC am Imperial College London, führt mehr als ein Dutzend internationale Partner mit regionalen und institutionsübergreifenden Zentren in Australien, Kanada, China, Japan, Singapur, Taiwan, den Vereinigten Staaten und dem Vereinigten Königreich zusammen. Seit 2012 hat das NPC bewährte Praktiken für Labor- und Forschungsmethoden in der Phänomik etabliert und das neue IPCN wird den Wissensaustausch in dieser Hinsicht auf dem gesamten Globus unterstützen. Wenn Forschungen auf die gleiche, harmonisierte Weise durchgeführt werden, erleichtert dies die Verknüpfung von Datensätzen und den Vergleich von Ergebnissen. Das bedeutet, dass man umfangreichere und komplexere Studien, die ansonsten nicht möglich gewesen wären, in Angriff nehmen und weniger komplexe Studien viel schneller abschließen kann, als es einem einzelnen Zentrum mit isolierter Arbeitsweise möglich ist. „Phänomik-Forschung ist in der Tat eines der nächsten medizinischen Grenzgebiete, mit dem wir unser Wissen über eine ganze Reihe von Erkrankungen und gesundheitlichen Störungen voranbringen können", sagte Professor Dame Sally Davies, Chief Medical Officer des Vereinigten Königreichs. „Die Art und Weise, wie wir Autismus, Krebs, psychische Erkrankungen, Schlaganfall, Adipositas, Stoffwechselkrankheiten und Diabetes Typ 2 behandeln, könnte insgesamt durch die Forschung in diesem Bereich revolutioniert werden. Darüber hinaus ist diese grenzübergreifende Arbeit von entscheidender Bedeutung, um Wege zu finden, wie man auf die größten globalen Herausforderungen für die öffentliche Gesundheit - mit denen wir heutzutage schneller denn je konfrontiert werden - reagiert." „Wir in Singapur begrüßen den Start des International Phenome Centre Network", sagte Professor James Best, Dekan an der Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University. „Mithilfe dieser Partnerschaft eröffnen sich dem Singapore Phenome Centre an der Nanyang Technological University verbesserte Möglichkeiten für eine internationale Zusammenarbeit. Durch die Zusammenfassung von Daten, die über harmonisierte Methoden erhoben wurden, und den Austausch von Ideen werden wir ein besseres Verständnis für die biochemischen Anomalien entwickeln, die den Stoffwechselerkrankungen wie Diabetes zugrundeliegen." „Das WISH-Programm zielt darauf ab, Veränderungen der globalen Gesundheitsbedürfnisse und aufkommende Probleme im Bereich Medizin und Gesundheitsversorgung zu verstehen und abzubilden", sagte Professor Lord Ara Darzi of Denham, Direktor des Institute of Global Health Innovation am Imperial College London. „Das IPCN wird sich dafür einsetzen, viele dieser offenen Gesundheitsfragen zu untersuchen, beispielsweise Adipositas, Diabetes, Krebserkrankungen und Autismus, um ein technologisches Rahmenwerk zur Erforschung der komparativen Biologie von Erkrankungen auf globaler Ebene zu schaffen." Die Gründer des Netzwerks sind das Imperial College London gemeinsam mit den Unternehmenspartnern Waters Corporation und Bruker Corporation. Waters und Bruker haben die Massenspektrometrie- und die Kernspinresonanzspektroskopie-Technologien (nuclear magnetic resonance/NMR) entwickelt, die eine fortschrittliche, präzise und effiziente metabolische Phänotypisierung möglich machen. Die metabolische Phänotypisierung beinhaltet die Identifizierung von in Körperflüssigkeiten und Gewebeproben vorhandenen Stoffwechselprodukten, die Informationen über den aktuellen Gesundheitszustand und die physiologischen Funktionen einer Person bereitstellen. Dies liefert wiederum Informationen über Erkrankungen und metabolische Pathologien.


-- The International Phenome Centre Network (IPCN) of leading global research institutions works to transform healthcare through phenomics - the dynamic interactions between our genes and our environment. -- Phenomics can advance precision medicine through enabling better understanding of diseases of worldwide significance, including autism, cancers, mental health issues, stroke, obesity, metabolic diseases and type 2 diabetes. -- Initiated by the MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre at Imperial College London, the IPCN includes more than a dozen international partners with regional, multi-institutional hubs in Australia, Canada, China, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, the United States and the United Kingdom. DOHA, Qatar, Nov. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- A new global network linking leading research centres across the world has launched today to tackle some of the most pressing global health challenges of our time such as autism, cancer, diabetes and dementia. The International Phenome Centre Network (IPCN) will greatly increase global research capabilities in the field of phenomics. Through comprehensive analysis of biological fluids or tissue samples, phenomics examines how our lifestyles and the environment we are exposed to interact with our genes. It can help explain why some people develop disease when others don't. The network launched at a special presentation at the World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) in Doha, Qatar. It is widely recognised that people's genes are not enough to explain how disease develops, and that disease prevention, detection and treatment can be improved by understanding the dynamic interactions between our genes, environments, microbiomes, diets and lifestyles, and their expression in diverse individuals and populations. The mission of the IPCN is to better understand how variation in gene-environment interactions affects disease across the lifespan for different populations. Using robust and harmonized data sets representing the world's diverse populations, this research will inform global public health policies and the development of new therapies. "The world is facing an unprecedented confluence of environmental and lifestyle factors that are dramatically increasing the risks of chronic disease, and posing the greatest public health challenges seen in modern times. The International Phenome Centre Network is creating internationally harmonised centres of analytical science focused on understanding gene-environment interactions that underpin disease risk, the comparative biology of major diseases, and addressing unmet healthcare and medical needs," said Professor Jeremy Nicholson, Director of the MRC-NIHR National Phenome Centre (NPC) and Head of Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London. Initiated by the NPC at Imperial College London, the IPCN includes more than a dozen international partners with regional, multi-institutional hubs in Australia, Canada, China, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, the United States and the United Kingdom. Since 2012, the NPC has established best-practice laboratory and research methodologies in phenomics, and the new IPCN will share this knowledge around the globe. If research is conducted in the same, harmonized fashion it makes it easier to combine data sets and compare results. This means that larger, more complex studies can be undertaken than would be otherwise possible, and less complex studies completed much faster than an individual centre could do in isolation. "Phenomic research really is one of the next medical frontiers which can advance our understanding of a whole raft of diseases and conditions," said Professor Dame Sally Davies, Chief Medical Officer of the United Kingdom. "The way we treat autism, cancers, mental health, stroke, obesity, metabolic diseases and type 2 diabetes could all be revolutionised by research in this area. It is also really good for work to cross international boundaries to find ways of tackling the biggest global public health challenges facing us today faster." "In Singapore, we welcome the launch of the International Phenome Centre Network," said Professor James Best, Dean, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University. "Through this partnership, the Singapore Phenome Centre at Nanyang Technological University will have enhanced opportunity to collaborate internationally. By pooling data obtained with harmonised methodology and by sharing ideas, we will better understand the biochemical abnormalities underlying metabolic disorders such as diabetes." "The WISH program is dedicated to understanding and mapping changes in global health needs and emergent medical and healthcare problems," said Professor the Lord Ara Darzi of Denham, Director of the Institute of Global Health Innovation at Imperial College London. "The IPCN is set to take on many of these healthcare challenges, such as obesity, diabetes, cancers and autism, and to create a technological framework for studying the comparative biology of disease at the global scale." The founders of the network are Imperial College London with its corporate partners Waters Corporation and Bruker Corporation. Waters and Bruker have developed the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy technologies which makes advanced, precise, and efficient metabolic phenotyping possible. Metabolic phenotyping involves identifying metabolites present in bodily fluids and tissue samples that provide information on a person's current state of health and physiological function. This in turn provides information on disease and metabolic pathologies.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers at the Centre for Quantum Technologies in Singapore find that quantum 'replicants' could be more efficient than classical models The word 'replicant' evokes thoughts of a sci-fi world where society has replaced common creatures with artificial machines that replicate their behaviour. Now researchers from Singapore have shown that if such machines are ever created, they'll run more efficiently if they harness quantum theory to respond to the environment. This follows the findings of a team from the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT), published 10 February in npj Quantum Information. The team investigated 'input-output processes', assessing the mathematical framework used to describe arbitrary devices that make future decisions based on stimuli received from the environment. In almost all cases, they found, a quantum device is more efficient because classical devices have to store more past information than is necessary to simulate the future. "The reason turns out to be quantum theory's lack of a definitive reality," says co-author Mile Gu, an Assistant Professor at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, who is affiliated with CQT. "Quantum mechanics has this famous feature where some properties of quantum particles are not just unknown before they are measured, but fundamentally do not exist in a definitive state prior to the act of measurement," he says. The physics only specifies the probabilities the system collapses to each possible value once the measurement is performed. That lets the quantum system, in a sense, do more with less. Co-author Jayne Thompson, a Research Fellow at CQT, explains further: "Classical systems always have a definitive reality. They need to retain enough information to respond correctly to each possible future stimulus. By engineering a quantum device so that different inputs are like different quantum measurements, we can replicate the same behaviour without retaining a complete description of how to respond to each individual question." Andrew Garner, another Research Fellow at CQT, and Vlatko Vedral, a Principal Investigator at CQT and Professor at the University of Oxford, also contributed to the paper. The findings advance earlier work. In 2012, Vedral, Gu and others proved a similar result for another class of problems known as stochastic processes. These are systems that have dynamics independent of external stimuli. That result was just put to experimental test by collaborators from Griffith University in Australia. They constructed a real life quantum simulator of a stochastic process [Science Advances 3, e1601302 (2017)]. This proof-of-principle experiment used just two particles of light. The first simulations of input-output processes will probably be small-scale too, but Gu hopes to ultimately see quantum technologies simulating how complex systems will react and evolve in real life situations. "Input-output processes are ubiquitous in nature," says Vedral. "Every entity is essentially an input-output process, from neural networks that process past inputs to make future decisions, to seeds that determine when to germinate based on external stimuli," he says. "Humans have long been fascinated with the idea of replicating nature through machines, from Leonardo da Vinci's famous mechanical knight to speculative fiction of future androids like Philip K. Dick's 'Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep' that inspired the Blade Runner film," Gu says. "Perhaps androids in the future, engineered by an advanced civilization obsessed with efficiency, will instead dream of quantum sheep." J. Thompson et al, "Using quantum theory to simplify input-output processes" npj Quantum Information doi:10.1038/s41534-016-0001-3 (2017) This work was funded by the John Templeton Foundation Grant 53914 'Occam's Quantum Mechanical Razor: Can Quantum theory admit the Simplest Understanding of Reality?'; the Oxford Martin School; the Ministry of Education in Singapore, the Academic Research Fund Tier 3 MOE2012-T3-1-009; the Foundational Questions Institute Grant Observer-dependent complexity: The quantum-classical divergence over 'what is complex?' the National Research Foundation of Singapore and in particular NRF Award No. NRF-NRFF2016-02.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Government of Canada awards $18.2M for aluminum autoparts and better Li-ion battery management | Main | BIOX commissions 90M gallon biodiesel production facility in Houston » Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed an ultrafast high-contrast camera that could help self-driving cars and drones see better in extreme road conditions and in bad weather. Unlike typical optical cameras, which can be blinded by bright light and unable to make out details in the dark, NTU’s new smart camera can record the slightest movements and objects in real time. The new camera records the changes in light intensity between scenes at nanosecond intervals, much faster than conventional video, and it stores the images in a data format that is many times smaller as well. With a unique in-built circuit, the camera can do an instant analysis of the captured scenes, highlighting important objects and details. Developed by Assistant Professor Chen Shoushun from NTU’s School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, the new camera named Celex is now in its final prototype phase. Chen unveiled the prototype of Celex last month at the 2017 IS&T International Symposium on Electronic Imaging (EI 2017) in the US. A typical digital camera sensor has several millions pixels—sensor sites that record light information and are used to form a resulting picture. High-speed video cameras that record up to 120 frames or photos per second generate gigabytes of video data, which are then processed by a computer in order for self-driving vehicles to “see” and analyze their environment. The more complex the environment, the slower the processing of the video data, leading to lag times between “seeing” the environment and the corresponding actions that the self-driving vehicle has to take. The CeleX sensor allows pixel-parallel image processing at the focal plane and event-driven readout. Each pixel in the sensor can individually monitor the slope of change in light intensity and report an event if a threshold is reached. Row and column arbitration circuits process the pixel events and make sure only one is granted to access the output port at a time in a fairly ordered manner when they receive multiple requests simultaneously. The response time to the pixel event is at nanosecond scale. As such, the sensor can be tuned to capture motion objects with speed faster than a certain threshold. The speed of the sensor is not limited by any traditional concept such as exposure time, frame rate, etc. It can detect fast motion which is traditionally captured by expensive, high speed cameras running at tens of thousands frames per second and at the same time produces 1000x less data. The CeleX Chipset is a hardware-implemented video analytics system, which perceives stream of pixels from the sensor and conveys value-added signal processing. The resulting system will be a software-hardware co-processing platform, enabling high speed implementation of video analytic tasks such as optical flow and convolution. The platform features standard interface to existing vision systems. It overcomes the over demanding computing power requirement of the existing vision based systems which are difficult to be realized in mobile computing platforms. The research into the sensor technology started in 2009 and it has received $500,000 in funding from the Ministry of Education Tier 1 research grant and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Proof-of-Concept grant. Chen and his researchers have spun off a start-up company named Hillhouse Tech to commercialize the new camera technology. The start-up is incubated by NTUitive, NTU’s innovation and enterprise company. Chen expects that the new camera will be commercially ready by the end of this year; Hillhouse is already in talks with global electronic manufacturers.


Sum T.C.,Nanyang Technological University | Mathews N.,Nanyang Technological University | Mathews N.,Singapore Berkeley Research Initiative for Sustainable Energy
Energy and Environmental Science | Year: 2014

Solution-processed organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells are hailed as the recent major breakthrough in low-cost photovoltaics. Power conversion efficiencies approaching those of crystalline Si solar cells (exceeding 15%) have been reported. Remarkably, such phenomenal performances were achieved in a matter of 5 years-up from ∼3.8% back in 2009. Since then, the field has expanded exponentially. In this perspective, we review the basic working mechanisms of perovskite solar cells in relation to their intrinsic properties and fundamental photophysics. The current state-of-the-art and the open questions in this maturing field are also highlighted. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.


Xiao N.,Nanyang Technological University | Xie L.,Nanyang Technological University | Qiu L.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control | Year: 2012

This paper addresses the mean square stabilization problem for discrete-time networked control systems over fading channels. We show that there exists a requirement on the network over which an unstable plant can be stabilized. In the case of state feedback, necessary and sufficient conditions on the network for mean square stabilizability are derived. Under a parallel transmission strategy and the assumption that the overall mean square capacity of the network is fixed and can be assigned among parallel input channels, a tight lower bound on the overall mean square capacity for mean square stabilizability is presented in terms of the Mahler measure of the plant. The minimal overall capacity for stabilizability is also provided under a serial transmission strategy. For the case of dynamic output feedback, a tight lower bound on the capacity requirement for stabilization of SISO plants is given in terms of the anti-stable poles, nonminimum phase zeros and relative degree of the plant. Sufficient and necessary conditions are further derived for triangularly decoupled MIMO plants. The effect of pre- and post-channel processing and channel feedback is also discussed, where the channel feedback is identified as a key component in eliminating the limitation on stabilization induced by the nonminimum phase zeros and high relative degree of the plant. Finally, the extension to the case with output fading channels and the application of the results to vehicle platooning are presented. © 2012 IEEE.


Zhang G.,Center for Electromobility | Zhang G.,Nanyang Technological University | Lou X.W.,Center for Electromobility | Lou X.W.,Nanyang Technological University
Advanced Materials | Year: 2013

Mesoporous NiCo2O4 nanosheets can be directly grown on various conductive substrates, such as Ni foam, Ti foil, stainless-steel foil and flexible graphite paper, through a general template-free solution method combined with a simple post annealing treatment. As a highly integrated binder- and conductive-agent-free electrode for supercapacitors, the mesoporous NiCo2O4 nanosheets supported on Ni foam deliver ultrahigh capacitance and excellent high-rate cycling stability. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Jiang Y.,Nanyang Technological University | Park C.-M.,Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
Chemical Science | Year: 2014

We have developed a dual reaction manifold that enables the selective synthesis of both pyridines and pyrroles from the common substrates α-diazo oxime ethers. The strong propensity of 1,3-dienyl nitrenes for 4π-electrocyclization to give pyrroles could be diverted to 6π-electrocyclization via a 1,6-hydride shift or prototropic isomerization, leading to the exclusive formation of pyridines by employing metal nitrene complexes derived from α-diazo oxime ethers under Rh(ii) catalysis. Furthermore, an orthogonal catalytic system has been identified that promotes the selective formation of 1H-pyrroles from the same substrates by redirecting the reactivity of vinyl 2H-azirine intermediates. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

For the 100 million people who live within 3 feet of sea level in East and Southeast Asia, the news that sea level in their region fluctuated wildly more than 6,000 years ago is important, according to research published by a team of ocean scientists and statisticians, including Rutgers professors Benjamin Horton and Robert Kopp and Rutgers Ph.D. student Erica Ashe. That's because those fluctuations occurred without the assistance of human-influenced climate change. In a paper published in Nature Communications, Horton, Kopp, Ashe, lead author Aron Meltzner and others report that the relative sea level around Belitung Island in Indonesia rose twice just under 2 feet in the period from 6,850 years ago to 6,500 years ago. That this oscillation took place without any human-assisted climate change suggests to Kopp, Horton and their co-authors that such a change in sea level could happen again now, on top of the rise in sea level that is already projected to result from climate change. This could be catastrophic for people living so close to the sea. "This research is a very important piece of work that illustrates the potential rates of sea-level rise that can happen from natural variability alone," says Horton, professor of marine and coastal sciences in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. "If a similar oscillation were to occur in East and Southeast Asia in the next two centuries, it could impact tens of millions of people and associated ecosystems." Meltzner, a senior research fellow at the Earth Observatory of Singapore at Nanyang Technological University, along with Horton, Kopp and their co-authors, used coral microatolls to understand when, and by how much, the sea level had risen and fallen near the Indonesian island of Belitung, which lies between Sumatra and Borneo. A microatoll is a circular coral colony, typically no more than about 20 feet across, in which the topmost coral is dead and the bottom part living and growing. By taking samples from microatolls in different places, scientists can date rises and falls of sea level. The microatolls are what scientists call a "proxy" - a natural process that provides a reliable record of past events. "In any region, you try to find the proxy controlled by sea level," Horton says. "In New Jersey, we have no corals, so we use salt marshes. In the tropics, corals are the go-to proxy." The scientists studied microatolls at two sites on opposite sides of the island. Meltzner says they didn't expect the fluctuations they found because those changes in sea level contradicted what they knew about sea level in Southeast Asia. "Our conventional understanding of ocean circulation and ice-melting history told us that such fluctuations should not occur, so we were a bit mystified at the results from our first site," Meltzner says. "But after finding a similar pattern at a second site 80 kilometers to the southeast, and ruling out other plausible explanations, it was clear that the coral growth patterns must reflect regional changes in sea level. There would be way too many coincidences otherwise." The paper comes out of a long-running research project aimed at understanding the physical processes involved in sea-level rise. Such understanding, Kopp says, is necessary to help scientists understand the present and likely future state of the ocean. "This is a basic science problem," Kopp says. "It's about understanding past changes. Understanding what drove those changes is what allows us to test the climate models we use to predict future changes." In addition to Meltzner, Horton, Kopp, and Ashe, the authors are Adam Switzer, Qiang Qiu, Emma Hill, and Jedrzej Majewski, also of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore; David Hill of Oregon State University, Sarah Bradley of Utrecht University and Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands; and Danny Natawidjaja and Bambang Suwargadi of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

El consejo de fideicomisarios del Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award ha celebrado su primera reunión en las oficinas de la Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Foundation (MBRF) para debatir las políticas generales del premio. A la reunión - presidida por Su Excelencia Jamal bin Huwaireb, director administrativo de MBRF, vicepresidente del consejo de fideicomisarios y secretario general del premio - asistieron los miembros del consejo Nick Rawlins, profesor de neurociencia de Condcta de la University of Oxford; David Bennett, vicepresidente de asociaciones empresariales globales de National Geographic; el doctor Ali Ahmed Al Ghafli, vice-decano de Ciencias Sociales del College of Humanities and Social Sciences de la UAE University; Alexander J.B. Zehnder, profesor visitante y miembro del consejo de fideicomisarios de la Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapur. El principal objetivo del premio es galvanizar el avance de cara a una economía de conocimiento dentro de los EAU, la región y el mundo, además de establecer una cultura construida en el intercambio de conocimiento y honrar los logros intelectuales y creativos que sirven para producir y diseminar el conocimiento. Su Excelencia bin Huwaireb afirmó: "El Knowledge Award busca aumentar la concienciación entorno a la importancia de propagar el conocimiento como medio para la consecución de un desarrollo sostenido, honrando a los pioneros que trabajan de cara a la revolución de la industria del conocimiento". El consejo de fideicomisarios celebrará una serie de reuniones ejecutivas para determinar los requisitos de aplicación y criterio de selección de los ganadores, tal y como reveló Su Excelencia bin Huwaireb, además de prepararse para la ceremonia de premios, que es parte de la Knowledge Summit 2016 (del 5 al 7 de diciembre). Mientras, el doctor Al Ghafli destacó que el Mundo Árabe desempeñaba un papel pivote en la propagación del conocimiento en los siglos anteriores; el premio sitúa a los árabes de vuelta a la pista para reclamar su historia destacada. El profesor Zehnder elogió el premio, indicando que podría beneficiar a toda la humanidad, subrayando el papel que el conocimiento desempeña en sus vidas, y en consecuencia, motivándoles para participar en la creación y propagación del conocimiento. David Bennett destacó que el premio era una iniciativa importante para honrar a todos los que hacían que el conocimiento estuviese disponible para las personas en todas partes. El profesor Rawlins, señaló mientras que la University of Oxford cuenta con una experiencia amplia en lo que respecta a la evaluación de las contribuciones en el campo del conocimiento, y con ello, desempeñará un papel activo dentro del consejo de fideicomisarios. El premio busca contribuir con el desarrollo sostenible de los EAU y del mundo. El valor monetario del premio es una cifra generosa de 1 millón de dólares. A finales del año 2015, Su Alteza Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum emitió el decreto número 36 de 2015, estableciendo el Knowledge Award. Su Alteza además emitió el decreto número 17 de 2016, en el que se establece el consejo de fideicomisarios y el nombramiento de sus miembros por un periodo de tres años renovable. El consejo está dirigido por Su Alteza Sheikh Ahmed bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum como presidente, con Su Excelencia Jamal bin Huwaireb como vicepresidente. Entre los miembros están representantes de la United Arab Emirates University; la University of Cairo; la Nanyang Technological University, Singapur; la University of Oxford y National Geographic.


Das Kuratorium für den Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award hat seine allererste Sitzung in den Büros der Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Foundation (MBRF) abgehalten, um die allgemeinen Richtlinien für den Award zu besprechen. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161116/440065 ) An der Sitzung, die von H.E. Jamal bin Huwaireb, dem Geschäftsführer von MBRF, dem stellvertretenden Vorsitzenden des Kuratoriums und dem Generalsekretär des Awards geleitet wurde, nahmen Mitglieder des Kuratoriums, Nick Rawlins, Professor für Behavioural Neuroscience an der University of Oxford; David Bennett, Vizepräsident, Global Corporate Partnerships bei National Geographic; Dr. Ali Ahmed Al Ghafli, Vizedekan für Social Sciences am College of Humanities and Social Sciences, UAE University; Alexander J.B. Zehnder, Gastprofessor und Kuratoriumsmitglied der Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapur, teil. Das wichtigste Ziel, das mit der Verleihung des Awards verfolgt wird, ist die Mobilisierung des Übergangs zu einer Wissensökonomie in den UAE, der Region und der Welt sowie die Schaffung einer Kultur, die auf dem Austausch von Wissen aufbaut, in der die intellektuellen und kreativen Errungenschaften ausgezeichnet werden, die zur Produktion und Verbreitung von Wissen beitragen. H.E. bin Huwaireb sagte: "Der Knowledge Award soll das Bewusstsein dafür schärfen, wie wichtig die Verbreitung von Wissen zur Erzielung einer nachhaltigen Entwicklung ist, indem er die Wegbereiter auszeichnet, die daran arbeiten, die Wissensindustrie zu revolutionieren." Das Kuratorium wird eine Reihe von Vorstandssitzungen abhalten, um die Bewerbungsanforderungen und Auswahlkriterien für die Gewinner festzulegen, sagte H.E. bin Huwaireb. Außerdem soll die Preisverleihung als Teil des Knowledge Summit 2016 (5.-7. Dezember) vorbereitet werden. Unterdessen sagte Dr. Al Ghafli, dass die arabische Welt in den vergangenen Jahrhunderten eine entscheidende Rolle bei der Verbreitung von Wissen spielte; der Award bringe die Araber wieder auf das richtige Gleis zurück, um diese lobenswerte Geschichte zurückzuerobern. Professor Zehnder lobte den Award und merkte an, dass er der gesamten Menschheit zugute käme. Er betonte die Rolle, die Wissen im Leben der Menschen spielt und sie daher motiviere, sich an der Schaffung und Verbreitung von Wissen zu beteiligen. David Bennett sagte, dass der Award eine wichtige Initiative darstellt, um diejenigen auszuzeichnen, die den Menschen überall Wissen verfügbar machen. Professor Rawlins wies darauf hin, dass die University of Oxford umfangreiche Erfahrung bei der Evaluierung von Beiträgen zum Wissensfeld hat und daher im Kuratorium eine aktive Rolle einnehmen werde. Der Award soll ein Beitrag zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung der UAE und der Welt sein. Der monetäre Wert des Awards ist die großzügige Summe von 1 Million USD. Ende 2015 hat H.H. Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum die Verordnung Nr. 36 von 2015 erlassen und damit den Knowledge Award etabliert. H.H. erließ zudem die Verordnung Nr. 17 von 2016, durch die das Kuratorium etabliert wurde, samt der Ernennung der Kuratoriumsmitglieder für drei verlängerbare Jahre. Das Kuratorium wird geleitet vom Vorsitzenden H.H. Sheikh Ahmed bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum und dem stellvertretenden Vorsitzenden H.E. Jamal bin Huwaireb. Zu den Mitgliedern zählen Repräsentanten der United Arab Emirates University; der University of Cairo; der Nanyang Technological University, Singapur; der University of Oxford; und des National Geographic.


DUBAI, United Arab Emirates, Nov. 16, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- The Board of Trustees of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award held its first-ever meeting at the offices of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Foundation (MBRF), to discuss the general policies of the Award. The meeting - chaired by H.E. Jamal bin Huwaireb, Managing Director of MBRF, Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees and Secretary General of the Award - was attended by Members of the Board, Nick Rawlins, Professor of Behavioural Neuroscience at the University of Oxford; David Bennett, Vice President, Global Corporate Partnerships at National Geographic; Dr. Ali Ahmed Al Ghafli, Vice Dean for Social Sciences at the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, UAE University; Alexander J.B. Zehnder, Visiting Professor and Member of the Board of Trustees of Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. The Award's main objective is to galvanise the shift towards a knowledge economy in the UAE, the region, and the world, as well as to establish a culture built on exchanging knowledge and honouring intellectual and creative achievements that serve to produce and disseminate knowledge. H.E. bin Huwaireb said: "The Knowledge Award seeks to raise awareness about the importance of spreading knowledge as a means to achieve sustainable development by honouring the pioneers working to revolutionise the knowledge industry." The Board of Trustees will hold a series of executive meetings to determine application requirements and selection criteria for the winners, H.E. bin Huwaireb revealed, as well as to prepare for the Award ceremony, part of the Knowledge Summit 2016 (December 5-7). Meanwhile, Dr. Al Ghafli said that the Arab World played a pivotal role in spreading knowledge in past centuries; the Award places Arabs back on the right track to reclaim that commendable history. Professor Zehnder lauded the Award, noting that it would benefit all of mankind, underlining the role that knowledge plays in their lives and, consequently, motivating them to participate in the creation and dissemination of knowledge. David Bennett said that the award is an important initiative honouring those who make knowledge available to people everywhere. Professor Rawlins, meanwhile, pointed out that the University of Oxford has extensive experience in evaluating contributions to the field of knowledge and will, therefore, play an active role within the Board of Trustees. The Award seeks to contribute to the sustainable development of the UAE and the world. The monetary value of the award is a generous $1 million. In late 2015, H.H. Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum issued Decree No. 36 of 2015, establishing the Knowledge Award. H.H. also issued Decree No. 17 of 2016, establishing the Board of Trustees and appointing its members for three renewable years. The Board is headed by H.H. Sheikh Ahmed bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum as Chairman, with H.E. Jamal bin Huwaireb as Vice Chairman. Members include representatives from the United Arab Emirates University; the University of Cairo; Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; the University of Oxford and National Geographic.


The Board of Trustees of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award held its first-ever meeting at the offices of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Foundation (MBRF), to discuss the general policies of the Award. The meeting - chaired by H.E. Jamal bin Huwaireb, Managing Director of MBRF, Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees and Secretary General of the Award - was attended by Members of the Board, Nick Rawlins, Professor of Behavioural Neuroscience at the University of Oxford; David Bennett, Vice President, Global Corporate Partnerships at National Geographic; Dr. Ali Ahmed Al Ghafli, Vice Dean for Social Sciences at the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, UAE University; Alexander J.B. Zehnder, Visiting Professor and Member of the Board of Trustees of Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. The Award's main objective is to galvanise the shift towards a knowledge economy in the UAE, the region, and the world, as well as to establish a culture built on exchanging knowledge and honouring intellectual and creative achievements that serve to produce and disseminate knowledge. H.E. bin Huwaireb said: "The Knowledge Award seeks to raise awareness about the importance of spreading knowledge as a means to achieve sustainable development by honouring the pioneers working to revolutionise the knowledge industry." The Board of Trustees will hold a series of executive meetings to determine application requirements and selection criteria for the winners, H.E. bin Huwaireb revealed, as well as to prepare for the Award ceremony, part of the Knowledge Summit 2016 (December 5-7). Meanwhile, Dr. Al Ghafli said that the Arab World played a pivotal role in spreading knowledge in past centuries; the Award places Arabs back on the right track to reclaim that commendable history. Professor Zehnder lauded the Award, noting that it would benefit all of mankind, underlining the role that knowledge plays in their lives and, consequently, motivating them to participate in the creation and dissemination of knowledge. David Bennett said that the award is an important initiative honouring those who make knowledge available to people everywhere. Professor Rawlins, meanwhile, pointed out that the University of Oxford has extensive experience in evaluating contributions to the field of knowledge and will, therefore, play an active role within the Board of Trustees. The Award seeks to contribute to the sustainable development of the UAE and the world. The monetary value of the award is a generous $1 million. In late 2015, H.H. Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum issued Decree No. 36 of 2015, establishing the Knowledge Award. H.H. also issued Decree No. 17 of 2016, establishing the Board of Trustees and appointing its members for three renewable years. The Board is headed by H.H. Sheikh Ahmed bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum as Chairman, with H.E. Jamal bin Huwaireb as Vice Chairman. Members include representatives from the United Arab Emirates University; the University of Cairo; Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; the University of Oxford; and National Geographic.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

In what’s surely to be one of cultural highlights of the year, world-renowned pianists Tong-Il Han and Helen Lee have been lined up to perform two spectacular classical concerts in Florida. Playing host to the events, which take place on Saturday March 4th at 7pm, and Sunday March 5th, at 3pm, is The Chopin Project® with performances to be held at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Sarasota. It looks certain to be a full house with the concerts’ producer already witnessing demand from local music lovers and aficionados right across the State. Beginning with an all-Chopin solo piano recital by Han on the 4th, and concluding when Han is joined by his wife Helen, for a performance of an all-Schubert programme on the 5th, the weekend event will provide the public with an increasingly rare chance to hear Han, now 75 years old, play some of the most beautiful music ever composed for the piano. Han, a former child prodigy, Juilliard scholar, Leventritt prize winner (probably the most prestigious international competition for classical pianists) and White House pianist for President and Mrs. Kennedy, together with Lee, herself an eminent pianist and educator, was persuaded to perform once again by Frederick Slutsky, the brains behind The Chopin Project®. The Chopin Project®, a global community sharing information, educational, audio and video resources, and producing live concerts and outreach events, focused on the great composer’s works, makes Chopin’s music more accessible to listeners and music students worldwide. And, when Slutsky found out that such celebrated musicians lived nearby, he began working on a series of ideas that has culminated in the scheduled performances as well as a separate student outreach event at Sarasota’s Booker High School on Monday, March 6th where there’ll be a master class, performance and student question and answer session. Slutsky explains: “Han is a compelling figure in my life so I’m really excited that I and others are going to be able to hear him play in such an intimate venue. Not only am I fascinated by his background – being born in what is now North Korea, discovered by a 3-star American General and brought to the US at just 12, before winning his scholarship and then the Leventritt Prize at just 23 – but he is also responsible for some of the best Chopin recordings including his 24 Preludes 4 Ballades and 4 Scherzos.” “Getting to know Han, and his wife Helen, has been a real privilege and I just know that the two concerts we have lined up will be a real treat for those equally as passionate about the music as me. I’m sure the events will captivate everyone who attends from the casual fan, to fledgling music student, or even the most deeply committed Chopin or Schubert scholar. And I hope to be announcing more good news soon as Han and Helen are very interested in some larger outreach events that I’m currently working to produce.” Chopin Project® founder and producer, Slutsky, concludes: “Largely designed as a way to inspire and move the next generation of musicians and concert-goers – the main thrust of our stimulating outreach programs with voluntary associations, conservatory-trained musicians and local schools – these two concerts are being subsidised generously by local business clients, friends, and Chopin Project® patrons, so that students from Sarasota or Manatee County can attend both events free of charge together with one accompanying parent who will also benefit from free admission.” Anyone wanting tickets for these two exceptional Chopin Project® concerts, at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Sarasota, on the 4th and 5th of March, can click here to buy them online or call (800) 838-3006 to speak to a sales agent. Admission costs $30 for adults. Although now winding down commitments after a life of playing, recording and teaching all over the world, Tong-Il Han enjoys an enviable reputation. Not only is his personal story inspirational, but his list of musical credits is almost unparalleled. He has performed with the finest orchestras in the world, among them, in America, the New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cleveland Orchestra, and Detroit Symphony. He has also played with the London Philharmonic, Royal Philharmonic, Scottish National Orchestra, Oslo Philharmonic, Monte Carlo Orchestra, Rotterdam Philharmonic, Polish Radio National Orchestra, Budapest Radio Symphony Orchestra, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra and Russian National Symphony, among many, many others. In a career spanning well over 50 years, Han has been a prolific recording artist, appeared regularly at many classical summer festivals and worked to improve the talents of young musicians: something he still enjoys doing with local students. He has taught music at Indiana University, Illinois State University, the University of North Texas and Boston University. He also served first as Dean of the College of Music and then as Chair Professor of Music at University of Ulsan in South Korea, as well as Guest Professor at Elisabeth University of Music in Hiroshima, Japan, and he has also taught at Korea’s Suncheon University. He now judges piano competitions worldwide. Helen Lee has studied piano performance with renowned musicians such as Leon Fleisher, Steven Bishop Kovachevich, James Tocco, Michel Block, Pamela Paul, and Vladimir Viardo. She received her Bachelor of Music degree from Indiana University, studying under a full scholarship, and her Master of Music from the University of North Texas, with a Teaching Fellowship. Her concert career covers cities in the USA, Korea, Hong Kong, Japan, Thailand, Singapore and Mexico, including as a guest soloist with the Seoul Juenesse Orchestra, the University of North Texas Orchestra, the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra and Daegu Philharmonic Orchestra. Lee taught as the National Institute of Education in Singapore for 14 years, and Nanyang Technological University for 5 years before her return to Korea in 2009, where she taught at Gwangju University. In addition to her musical career, she is also an award-winning artist having won an international painting competition in 2005 and having had her works shown all over the world. For more information, please visit http://www.chopinproject.com/


Adams D.H.,Nanyang Technological University | Adams D.H.,National Taiwan University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2010

A way to identify the would-be zero modes of staggered lattice fermions away from the continuum limit is presented. Our approach also identifies the chiralities of these modes, and their index is seen to be determined by gauge field topology in accordance with the index theorem. The key idea is to consider the spectral flow of a certain Hermitian version of the staggered Dirac operator. The staggered fermion index thus obtained can be used as a new way to assign the topological charge of lattice gauge fields. In a numerical study in U(1) backgrounds in two dimensions it is found to perform as well as the Wilson index while being computationally more efficient. It can also be expressed as the index of an overlap Dirac operator with a new staggered fermion kernel. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Cambria E.,Nanyang Technological University | White B.,SLAC
IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine | Year: 2014

Natural language processing (NLP) is a theory-motivated range of computational techniques for the automatic analysis and representation of human language. NLP research has evolved from the era of punch cards and batch processing (in which the analysis of a sentence could take up to 7 minutes) to the era of Google and the likes of it (in which millions of webpages can be processed in less than a second). This review paper draws on recent developments in NLP research to look at the past, present, and future of NLP technology in a new light. Borrowing the paradigm of 'jumping curves' from the field of business management and marketing prediction, this survey article reinterprets the evolution of NLP research as the intersection of three overlapping curves-namely Syntactics, Semantics, and Pragmatics Curves- which will eventually lead NLP research to evolve into natural language understanding.


Guo Z.,Nanyang Technological University | Liu B.,Nanyang Technological University | Zhang Q.,Xiamen University | Deng W.,Xiamen University | And 3 more authors.
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2014

Oxidation catalysis not only plays a crucial role in the current chemical industry for the production of key intermediates such as alcohols, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones and organic acids, but also will contribute to the establishment of novel green and sustainable chemical processes. This review is devoted to dealing with selective oxidation reactions, which are important from the viewpoint of green and sustainable chemistry and still remain challenging. Actually, some well-known highly challenging chemical reactions involve selective oxidation reactions, such as the selective oxidation of methane by oxygen. On the other hand some important oxidation reactions, such as the aerobic oxidation of alcohols in the liquid phase and the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen, have attracted much attention in recent years because of their high significance in green or energy chemistry. This article summarizes recent advances in the development of new catalytic materials or novel catalytic systems for these challenging oxidation reactions. A deep scientific understanding of the mechanisms, active species and active structures for these systems are also discussed. Furthermore, connections among these distinct catalytic oxidation systems are highlighted, to gain insight for the breakthrough in rational design of efficient catalytic systems for challenging oxidation reactions. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.


Chen J.S.,Nanyang Technological University | Archer L.A.,Cornell University | Wen Lou X.,Nanyang Technological University
Journal of Materials Chemistry | Year: 2011

As an important energy storage platform for portable electronics, lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been challenged by steadily growing demands for better performance, improved safety, and enhanced reliability. A variety of nanomaterials has emerged with good electrochemical properties and can be regarded as promising electrode materials for LIBs. In this feature article, we will specifically discuss two nanomaterials systems with unique structures, which show particular promise as anode materials for LIBs: tin dioxide (SnO 2) hollow spheres and anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanosheets (NSs) with exposed (001) high-energy facets. For both systems, we survey approaches for synthesizing the unique nanostructured materials required for improved LIB performance and subsequently review their lithium storage properties. By focusing on SnO2 and TiO2, we seek to provide rational understanding of the relationship between proper nanostructuring and enhanced physicochemical properties of the active anode material in LIBs; hopefully uncovering new possibilities to generate advanced materials for next generation rechargeable batteries. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


You K.,Tsinghua University | Xie L.,Nanyang Technological University
IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing | Year: 2013

This paper is concerned with the design of transmission scheduler and estimator for linear discrete-time stochastic systems to reduce the number of measurements to be transmitted from sensor to estimator. To this purpose, both controllable and uncontrollable scheduling schemes are considered, respectively. A controllable scheduler is designed as a deterministic function of system measurements, and sequentially decides the transmission of each element of a measurement vector to the estimator. We derive an approximate minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimator. On the other hand, an uncontrollable scheduler means that the transmission of the measurement vector is driven by a random process which is independent of system evolution. The MMSE estimator under this scheduler is cast as the Kalman filtering with intermittent observations. Some stability conditions are established for both the estimators. Finally, illustrative examples are included to validate the theoretical results. © 1991-2012 IEEE.


Chen C.-M.,Nanyang Technological University | Delmas M.A.,University of California at Los Angeles
Operations Research | Year: 2012

Growing social concerns over the environmental externalities associated with business activities are pushing firms to identify activities that create economic value with less environmental impact and to become more eco-efficient. Over the past two decades, researchers have increasingly used frontier efficiency models to evaluate productive efficiency in the presence of undesirable outputs, such as greenhouse gas emissions or toxic emissions. In this paper, we identify critical flaws in existing frontier models and show that these models can identify eco-inefficient firms as eco-efficient. We develop a new eco-inefficiency frontier model that rectifies these problems. Our model calculates an eco-inefficiency score for each firm and improvements in outputs necessary to attain eco-efficiency. We demonstrate through a Monte Carlo experiment that our eco-inefficiency model provides a more reliable measurement of corporate eco-inefficiency than the existing frontier models. We also extend the single-output Cobb-Douglas production function to multiple desirable and undesirable outputs. This extension allows for greater flexibility in the simulation analysis of frontier models. © 2012 INFORMS.


Ambrogio M.W.,Northwestern University | Thomas C.R.,University of California at Los Angeles | Zhao Y.-L.,Nanyang Technological University | Zink J.I.,University of California at Los Angeles | Stoddart J.F.,Northwestern University
Accounts of Chemical Research | Year: 2011

Medicine can benefit significantly from advances in nanotechnology because nanoscale assemblies promise to improve on previously established therapeutic and diagnostic regimes. Over the past decade, the use of delivery platforms has attracted attention as researchers shift their focus toward new ways to deliver therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents and away from the development of new drug candidates. Metaphorically, the use of delivery platforms in medicine can be viewed as the "bow-and-arrow" approach, where the drugs are the arrows and the delivery vehicles are the bows. Even if one possesses the best arrows that money can buy, they will not be useful if one does not have the appropriate bow to deliver the arrows to their intended location.Currently, many strategies exist for the delivery of bioactive agents within living tissue. Polymers, dendrimers, micelles, vesicles, and nanoparticles have all been investigated for their use as possible delivery vehicles. With the growth of nanomedicine, one can envisage the possibility of fabricating a theranostic vector that could release powerful therapeutics and diagnostic markers simultaneously and selectively to diseased tissue.In our design of more robust theranostic delivery systems, we have focused our attention on using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (SNPs). The payload "cargo" molecules can be stored within this robust domain, which is stable to a wide range of chemical conditions. This stability allows SNPs to be functionalized with stimulus-responsive mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) in the shape of bistable rotaxanes and psuedorotaxanes to yield mechanized silica nanoparticles (MSNPs).In this Account, we chronicle the evolution of various MSNPs, which came about as a result of our decade-long collaboration, and discuss advances in the synthesis of novel hybrid SNPs and the various MIMs which have been attached to their surfaces. These MIMs can be designed in such a way that they either change shape or shed off some of their parts in response to a specific stimulus, such as changes in redox potential, alterations in pH, irradiation with light, or the application of an oscillating magnetic field, allowing a theranostic payload to be released from the nanopores to a precise location at the appropiate time. We have also shown that these integrated systems can operate not only within cells, but also in live animals in response to pre-existing biological triggers. Recognizing that the theranostics of the future could offer a fresh approach to the treatment of degenerative diseases including cancer, we aim to start moving out of the chemical domain and into the biological one. Some MSNPs are already being tested in biological systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Patent
Agency For Science and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2013-12-10

The invention relates to a method to encapsulate nanoparticles into a protein cage by inserting the nanoparticles into the core through holes. Currently commercially available nanoparticles can be functionalized using the inventive method. The inventive hybrids have applications in biosensing and bioimaging. The use of an affinity between poly-histidine chains and nitrilotriacetic acid as chelating reagent to obtain the inventive cages and hybrid assemblies by the method according to the invention is shown in FIG. 1.


Patent
Agency For Science and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2014-12-09

Various embodiments provide a method of fabricating a fibre, the method comprising translating a fibre having a light transmissive core surrounding by a cladding material; and while translating, non-interferometrically applying energy to alter structure of the light transmissive core and/or the cladding material.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and Rice University | Date: 2012-08-27

Various embodiments of the resistive memory cells and arrays discussed herein comprise: (1) a first electrode; (2) a second electrode; (3) resistive memory material; and (4) a diode. The resistive memory material is selected from the group consisting of SiO_(x), SiO_(x)H, SiO_(x)N_(y), SiO_(x)N_(y)H, SiO_(x)Cz, SiO_(x)C_(z)H, and combinations thereof, wherein each of x, y and z are equal or greater than 1 or equal or less than 2. The diode may be any suitable diode, such as n-p diodes, p-n diodes, and Schottky diodes.


Patent
Agency For Science and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2014-09-18

Method of detecting one or more analytes having a thiol functional group is provided. The method includes contacting one or more analytes with at least one metal carbonyl cluster compound; and detecting changes in optical properties of the at least one metal carbonyl cluster compound as an indication of the presence of the one or more analytes having a thiol functional group.


Patent
Agency For Science and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2014-09-09

A photoacoustic imaging contrast agent composition is provided. The composition comprises a metal carbonyl cluster compound having the general formula (I) M_(3)(CO)_(x)L_(12-x )wherein M at each occurrence denotes a metal selected from Group 6 to Group 11 of the Periodic Table of Elements; x is an integer from 10 to 12; and each L is independently selected from the group consisting of H and -A-(CH_(2))_(n)COO^()Y^(+), wherein A is selected from the group consisting of S, O, C and N; n is an integer from 1 to 10; and Y is any cation. Use of the photoacoustic imaging contrast agent composition in photoacoustic imaging is also provided.


Patent
Agency For Science and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2014-11-14

A micro-machined optical pressure sensor, comprising: a diaphragm configured to deform when a force is applied thereto; and a sensing micro-ring spaced apart from the diaphragm by a gap, the gap being variable depending on the force applied on the diaphragm, wherein the sensing micro-ring is configured to produce a resonance wavelength shift when the gap is varied, the resonance wavelength shift indicative of the force applied to the diaphragm.


Patent
University of California at Los Angeles and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2014-06-10

Embodiments include methods, devices, software, and systems for identifying a person based on relatively permanent pigmented or vascular skin mark (RPPVSM) patterns in images. Locations of RPPVSMs in different images of people are point matched, and a correspondence probability that the point matched RPPVSMs are from different people is calculated. Other embodiments are also described. Other embodiments are also described and claimed.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and Agency For Science | Date: 2013-10-17

Sucker ring tooth (SRT) proteins called Suckerins were identified from the sucker tissue of three distantly related Decapodiformes species. These proteins assemble into silk-like beta-sheet reinforced materials. The use of suckerin proteins to produce fibres, films and tissue scaffolds is also described.


Patent
Agency For Science and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2014-03-28

The present invention provides the use of a metal-doped hydroxyapatite catalyst for highly selective conversion of an alcohol to an aldehyde at low temperatures. More specifically, the invention provides the use of a silver-doped hydroxyapatite catalyst for the highly selective oxidative dehydrogenation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. The present invention also provides the method for converting ethanol to acetaldehyde using a silver-doped hydroxyapatite catalyst.


Patent
Agency For Science and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2011-03-11

The invention relates to a method for detecting the presence or amount of an analyte, said method comprising (a) coupling the analyte to a carrier molecule, wherein the carrier molecule is larger in size, electrically charged and/or polar, to form an analyte:carrier molecule complex; (b) contacting the analyte:carrier molecule complex of (a) with an analyte-binding molecule coupled to a semiconducting nanostructure; and (c) determining the change in conductance upon binding of the analyte:carrier molecule complex to the analyte-binding molecule and correlating the determined change in conductance to the presence or amount of the analyte. Alternatively, the analyte:carrier molecule complex of (a) is immobilized on the nanostructure and the immobilized analyte:carrier molecule complex is contacted with the analyte-binding molecule.


Patent
Agency For Science and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2013-09-24

A composite comprising a conducting polymer and a graphene-based material is provided. The composite includes a graphene-based material doped with nitrogen or having a nitrogen-containing species grafted thereon, and a conducting polymer arranged on the graphene-based material. Methods of preparing the composite, and electrodes formed from the composite are also provided.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and Agency For Science | Date: 2014-09-16

A method of detecting one or more analytes comprising or consisting of hydrogen peroxide using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is provided. The method includes providing a SERS-active substrate having at least one metal carbonyl cluster compound attached thereon; contacting one or more analytes with the SERS-active substrate; and detecting changes in surface enhanced Raman signal from the at least one metal carbonyl cluster compound as an indication of the presence of one or more analytes comprising or consisting of hydrogen peroxide.


Patent
Nanyang Technological University and Agency For Science | Date: 2013-09-06

In various embodiments, a method of breaking down biological material is provided. The method may include providing a sample comprising the biological material in a liquid. The method may further include providing a gas such that the gas forms an interface with the liquid. The method may also include breaking down the biological material by applying acoustic waves in a plurality of sequential bursts to the interface.


A postdoctoral researcher at Tsinghua University was killed in a Dec. 18 explosion and fire in a chemistry laboratory on the Beijing campus, according to university statements on the Chinese microblogging site Weibo. Local media report that the deceased researcher is Xiangjian Meng, 32. He received a Ph.D. from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore in 2014. “We are deeply saddened by the accident and loss of a . . .


News Article | April 29, 2016
Site: phys.org

The new material is designed to help healthy cells "win the race" to a medical implant, beating off competition from bacterial cells and thus reducing the likelihood of the implant being rejected by the body. The failure rate of certain medical implants is high – around 40% for hip implants – due to the formation of thin films of microorganisms on an implant when it is first inserted into the body. This prevents healthy cells from attaching and results in the body eventually rejecting the implant, potentially leading to serious medical complications for patients. Reporting their findings in the IOP Publishing journal Biomedical Materials, a team of researchers from the Agency for Science, Technology and Research in Singapore, Nanyang Technological University and City University of Hong Kong produced a material that not only repelled bacteria but also attracted healthy cells. The base of the material was made of multiple layers of water-soluble macromolecules called polyelectrolytes, onto which specific bonding molecules, called ligands, were attached. The team tested various concentrations of different ligands. They found that a naturally occurring protein building block called RGD was effective at inhibiting the attachment of bacterial cells and attracting healthy cells when it was attached to multilayers of certain polyelectrolytes. It surpassed collagen in this regard. "The method we developed helped the host cells win the so-called 'race-for-surface' battle, forming a confluent layer on the implant surface which protects it from possible bacterial adhesion and colonisation," explains the lead author, Vincent Chan of Nanyang Technological University. Medical implants currently incorporate antibacterial silver coatings. "However, the total amount of silver used must be very carefully controlled because high concentrations could kill mammalian cells and become toxic to the human body," says Professor Chan. By comparison, "the bio-selective coatings we've created do not have this problem, as the materials used are non-toxic and the environmentally sustainable preparation process uses water as a solvent." "At the moment this is just a proof-of-concept study, so there is still a long way to go before the coating can be used on implants in a clinical setting," he adds. "In future studies we hope to improve the long-term stability of the coating." Explore further: New optimized coatings for implants reduce risk of infection


News Article | October 25, 2016
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Over the last two decades, Materials Today has established itself as one of the most respected sources of information in materials science and engineering, with the namesake journal recently achieving an Impact Factor* of 17.793, and its companion website covering news, opinion and interviews on the latest advances. Now, in addition to publishing invited reviews, our flagship journal Materials Today will also publish the most exciting original research papers from the materials community. Under the expert leadership of new Editors-in-Chief Professor Jun Lou of Rice University and Professor Gleb Yushin of Georgia Tech, the journal is now open for submissions showcasing the latest cutting-edge research. In tandem, the journal is becoming a hybrid open access and subscription title. But that’s only part of the story. We’re not just expanding a single journal; we’re launching new titles to offer comprehensive coverage across materials science. Regardless of the topic, article type or significance within the field, there’ll be a suitable journal within the combined Materials Today family. We want to give every materials researcher the opportunity to get involved with Materials Today. As well as expanding the scope and reach of Materials Today, Elsevier is also launching a series of specialist companion titles. Like Materials Today, each new title will offer a combination of the best peer-reviewed primary research and invited reviews from experts in the field. The first of these new titles, Applied Materials Today, was launched last year to provide a rapid communication forum for cutting-edge applications of novel materials, now under the expert guidance of Professor Martin Pumera at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Building on these foundations, Elsevier has recently launched Materials Today Energy and Materials Today Chemistry, placing some of the most active and engaging areas of research center stage. These new complementary titles will support the community as highly visible forums for the discussion of significant new discoveries in key areas of materials science. The extended Materials Today family of journals includes over 100 materials science journals published by Elsevier, including Biomaterials, Nano Energy, Carbon, and Polymer.  To complete the coverage provided by the new Materials Today portfolio of journals, Materials Today Communications is now providing a home for technically sound research in materials science, while Materials Today: Proceedings is dedicated to publishing peer-reviewed research presented at conferences. Closer connections between publications is expected to make publishing easier and more streamlined for authors, as papers can be transferred to the journal which offers the best fit, across the titles united under the Materials Today banner. Each of the Materials Today family of titles will be able to accept articles into Materials Today Communications based on existing reviews; a process that’s already in place and saving valuable time for thirteen materials science titles in the extended family. In a new era of communication, and with the boundaries between traditional disciplines blurring, the Materials Today family of journals will showcase all the latest materials science research from the big picture to the smallest – but often most crucial – detail. “It’s a very exciting time,” says Elsevier’s Publishing Director for Materials Science, Dr Christiane Barranguet. “And we’re very delighted that Materials Today is able to lead the way in the field. By forging closer links between publications, Elsevier and Materials Today are enhancing the connectivity in the materials research community in news ways.” Click here to read more about the Materials Today family.


News Article | January 23, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

It has been a puzzle why blinking does not change the consistency in vision. People blink every few seconds yet there are no intervals of darkness and light. A new research has explained the matter saying the brain must be thanked for the seamless vision despite blinking shuttering the eyes. In the mechanics of blinking, an automatic shuttering of eyelids happens with the rolling of eyeballs in the sockets. But often the eyeballs do not return to the former position when the eyes are opened. A research on the topic says the brain plays a big role in stabilizing vision despite the eyes closing momentarily. The study was led by a team of scientists from UC Berkeley, Singapore's Nanyang Technological University, Dartmouth College and Université Paris Descartes who showed that blinking does more than mere lubricating of dry eyes and shielding the eyes from irritants. The study published in Current Biology explains the process behind blinking and notes a repositioning exercise of eyeballs under the aegis of brain happens, keeping the focus steady on what was being viewed. A misalignment follows with eyeballs rolling in the sockets during a blink but when the eyes are reopened, their positions may be changed. The brain intervenes to correct this distortion and directs the eye muscles to readjust the vision, according to lead author Gerrit Maus who works at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore as an assistant professor. "Our eye muscles are quite sluggish and imprecise, so the brain needs to constantly adapt its motor signals to make sure our eyes are pointing where they're supposed to," said Maus. The findings point to the brain as the perceiver of difference in what was being viewed before and after a blink and guiding the eye muscles to make the corrections accordingly. This explains the paradox as to why there is more coherence of vision after blinking and no interruption or darkness. The experiments involved a dozen young adults who were made to watch a dot etched on a screen for long hours in a dark room. The participants' eye movements including their eye blinks were tracked in real time with the help of an infrared camera. For every blink, there was a 1-centimeter shift of the dot to the right. However, without the participants knowing it, the minor shift was being registered by the oculomotor system of the brain and the vision was being adjusted properly with respect to the dot. Many blinks and movements later, the eyes of the participants kept adjusting and automatically shifted to the spot where the dot was stationed previously. It was a real-time demonstration of the brain's ability to handle changes by prodding the muscles to repeal the errors, noted the author. Meanwhile, researchers at the University of Virginia Health System has come up with a treatment for dry eye. The human testing of the therapeutic drug will start in March. It marks a change in approach in terms of the treatments existing so far with the cause of dry eye being targeted than treating the outward symptoms. To be marketed under a trademark "Lacripep," the drug is a topical eye drop. Instead of suppressing inflammation, Lacripep aims to remove inflammation with a natural basal tearing mechanism and will add more health to cells that come in contact with tears. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Medronho B.,University of Algarve | Lindman B.,Lund University | Lindman B.,Nanyang Technological University
Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science | Year: 2014

Cellulose is a polymer so widely abundant and versatile that we can find it almost everywhere in many different forms and applications. Cellulose dissolution is a key aspect of many processes; the present treatise reviews the main achievements in the dissolution area. In particular, the main solvents used and underlying mechanisms are discussed. As is described, cellulose solvents are of highly different nature giving great challenges in the understanding and analyzing the subtle balance between different interactions. Recent work has much emphasized the role of cellulose charge and the concomitant ion entropy effects, as well as hydrophobic interactions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Muller F.,University of Birmingham | Tora L.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Tora L.,Nanyang Technological University
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Gene Regulatory Mechanisms | Year: 2014

One of the key events in eukaryotic gene regulation and consequent transcription is the assembly of general transcription factors and RNA polymerase II into a functional pre-initiation complex at core promoters. An emerging view of complexity arising from a variety of promoter associated DNA motifs, their binding factors and recent discoveries in characterising promoter associated chromatin properties brings an old question back into the limelight: how is a promoter defined? In addition to position-dependent DNA sequence motifs, accumulating evidence suggests that several parallel acting mechanisms are involved in orchestrating a pattern marked by the state of chromatin and general transcription factor binding in preparation for defining transcription start sites. In this review we attempt to summarise these promoter features and discuss the available evidence pointing at their interactions in defining transcription initiation in developmental contexts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin and epigenetic regulation of animal development. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Zhao D.,Nanyang Technological University | Reyhanoglu M.,Embry - Riddle Aeronautical University
Journal of Sound and Vibration | Year: 2014

Transient growth of acoustic disturbances could trigger thermoacoustic instability in a combustion system with non-orthogonal eigenmodes, even with stable eigenvalues. In this work, feedback control of transient growth of flow perturbations in a Rijke-type combustion system is considered. For this, a generalized thermoacoustic model with distributed monopole-like actuators is developed. The model is formulated in state-space to gain insights on the interaction between various eigenmodes and the dynamic response of the system to the actuators. Three critical parameters are identified: (1) the mode number, (2) the number of actuators, and (3) the locations of the actuators. It is shown that in general the number of the actuators K is related to the mode number N as K=N2. For simplicity in illustrating the main results of the paper, two different thermoacoustic systems are considered: system (a) with one mode and system (b) that involves two modes. The actuator location effect is studied in system (a) and it is found that the actuator location plays an important role in determining the control effort. In addition, sensitivity analysis of pressure- and velocity-related control parameters is conducted. In system (b), when the actuators are turned off (i.e., open-loop configuration), it is observed that acoustic energy transfers from the high frequency mode to the lower frequency mode. After some time, the energy is transferred back. Moreover, the high frequency oscillation grows into nonlinear limit cycle with the low frequency oscillation amplified. As a linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) is implemented to tune the actuators, both systems become asymptotically stable. However, the LQR controller fails in eliminating the transient growth, which may potentially trigger thermoacoustic instability. In order to achieve strict dissipativity (i.e., unity maximum transient growth), a transient growth controller is systematically designed and tested in both systems. Comparison is then made between the performance of the LQR controller and that of the transient growth controller. It is found in both systems that the transient growth controller achieves both exponential decay of the flow disturbance energy and unity maximum transient growth. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Zhang J.,Nanyang Technological University | Li C.M.,Nanyang Technological University | Li C.M.,Southwest University | Li C.M.,Chongqing Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Technologies of Clean Energies
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2012

Nanoporous metals, a representative type of nanostructured material, possess intriguing properties to generate enormously promising potentials for various important applications. In particular, with the advances of fabrication strategies, nanoporous metals with a variety of superior properties including unique pore structure, large specific surface area and high electrical conductivity have fuelled up great interests to explore their electrocatalytic properties and greatly extend their emerging applications in electrochemical sensing and energy systems. This tutorial review attempts to summarize the recent important progress towards the development of nanoporous metals, with special emphasis on fabrication methods and advanced electrochemical applications, such as electrocatalysts, chemical sensors and energy systems. Key scientific issues and prospective directions of research are also discussed. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Lu H.,Harbin Institute of Technology | Min Huang W.,Nanyang Technological University
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2013

The present work studies the synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon fiber on the electrical property and electro-activated recovery behavior of shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposites. The combination of CNT and carbon fiber results in improved electrical conductivity in the SMP nanocomposites. Carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs are grafted onto the carbon fibers and then self-assembled by deposition to significantly enhance the reliability of the bonding between carbon fiber and SMP via van der Waals and covalent crosslink. Furthermore, the self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs and carbon fibers enable the SMP nanocomposites for Joule heating triggered shape recovery. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.


Poh H.L.,Nanyang Technological University | Simek P.,Institute of Chemical Technology Prague | Sofer Z.,Institute of Chemical Technology Prague | Pumera M.,Nanyang Technological University
ACS Nano | Year: 2013

Doping of graphene with heteroatoms is an effective way to tailor its properties. Here we describe a simple and scalable method of doping graphene lattice with sulfur atoms during the thermal exfoliation process of graphite oxides. The graphite oxides were first prepared by Staudenmaier, Hofmann, and Hummers methods followed by treatments in hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, or carbon disulfide. The doped materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, combustible elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The ζ-potential and conductivity of sulfur-doped graphenes were also investigated in this paper. It was found that the level of doping is more dramatically influenced by the type of graphite oxide used rather than the type of sulfur-containing gas used during exfoliation. Resulting sulfur-doped graphenes act as metal-free electrocatalysts for an oxygen reduction reaction. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Jiang J.,Central China Normal University | Li Y.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Liu J.,Central China Normal University | Huang X.,Central China Normal University | And 2 more authors.
Advanced Materials | Year: 2012

Metal oxide nanostructures are promising electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors because of their high specific capacity/capacitance, typically 2-3 times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials. However, their cycling stability and rate performance still can not meet the requirements of practical applications. It is therefore urgent to improve their overall device performance, which depends on not only the development of advanced electrode materials but also in a large part "how to design superior electrode architectures". In the article, we will review recent advances in strategies for advanced metal oxide-based hybrid nanostructure design, with the focus on the binder-free film/array electrodes. These binder-free electrodes, with the integration of unique merits of each component, can provide larger electrochemically active surface area, faster electron transport and superior ion diffusion, thus leading to substantially improved cycling and rate performance. Several recently emerged concepts of using ordered nanostructure arrays, synergetic core-shell structures, nanostructured current collectors, and flexible paper/textile electrodes will be highlighted, pointing out advantages and challenges where appropriate. Some future electrode design trends and directions are also discussed. The development of high-performance lithium-ion batteries/ supercapacitors relies on not only the use of advanced electrode materials but also the design of electrode architectures. This Review focuses on the recent advances in design of advanced metal oxide-based hybrid nanostructure electrode. Several recently emerged concepts of using ordered nanostructure arrays, synergetic core-shell structures, nanostructured current collectors, and flexible paper/textile electrodes are highlighted. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Ambrosi A.,Nanyang Technological University | Sofer Z.,Institute of Chemical Technology Prague | Pumera M.,Nanyang Technological University
Small | Year: 2015

MoS2 and other transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have recently gained a renewed interest due to the interesting electronic, catalytic, and mechanical properties which they possess when down-sized to single or few layer sheets. Exfoliation of the bulk multilayer structure can be achieved by a preliminary chemical Li intercalation followed by the exfoliation due to the reaction of Li with water. Organolithium compounds are generally adopted for the Li intercalation with n-butyllithium (n-Bu-Li) being the most common. Here, the use of three different organolithium compounds are investigated and compared, i.e., methyllithium (Me-Li), n-butyllithium (n-Bu-Li) and tert-butyllithium (t-Bu-Li), used for the exfoliation of bulk MoS2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) are adopted for a comprehensive characterization of all materials under investigation. In addition, catalytic properties towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and capacitive properties are also tested. Different organolithium compounds exhibit different extent of Li intercalation resulting in different degrees of exfoliation. The inherent electrochemical behavior of MoS2 consisting of significant anodic and cathodic peaks as well as its capacitive behavior and catalytic properties towards hydrogen evolution reaction are strongly connected to the exfoliation compound used. This research significantly contributes to the development of large-scale synthesis of electrocatalytic MoS2-based materials. © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Pumera M.,Nanyang Technological University | Sofer Z.,Institute of Chemical Technology Prague | Ambrosi A.,Nanyang Technological University
Journal of Materials Chemistry A | Year: 2014

Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) (MoS2, MoSe 2, WS2, WSe2, etc.) are a chemically diverse class of compounds having band gaps from 0 to ∼2 eV and remarkable electrochemical properties. The band gaps and electrochemical properties of TMDs can be tuned by exchanging the transition metal or chalcogenide elements. After a brief description of the most commonly followed synthetic routes to prepare TMDs, we wish to highlight in this review the diverse electrochemical applications of MoS2, a representative and well-studied TMD, which range from its use as catalysts in hydrogen evolution reactions to its adoption in supercapacitors, batteries, solar cells, and hydrogen storage. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.


Le conseil d'administration constitué pour le Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award (Prix Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum de la Connaissance) s'est réuni pour la première fois dans les bureaux de la Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Foundation (MBRF) pour débattre des orientations générales de la récompense. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161116/440065 ) Présidé par Son Excellence Jamal bin Huwaireb, directeur général de la MBRF, vice-président du conseil d'administration et secrétaire général du prix, la réunion a rassemblé les membres du conseil Nick Rawlins, professeur en neurosciences comportementales à l'université d'Oxford, David Bennett, responsable des Partenariats d'entreprise à l'échelle internationale au National Geographic, le Dr Ali Ahmed Al Ghafli, vice-doyen de la faculté de sciences sociales et de sciences humaines de l'université des Émirats arabes unis, et Alexander J.B. Zehnder, professeur invité et membre du conseil d'administration de la Nanyang Technological University (NTU) à Singapour. Le principal objectif du prix est de favoriser la transition vers une économie fondée sur la connaissance dans les EAU, la région et le monde et d'instaurer une culture construite autour de l'échange de connaissances et du respect des avancées intellectuelles et créatives qui permettent de produire et diffuser le savoir. Son Excellence bin Huwaireb a déclaré : « Le Knowledge Award vise à sensibiliser à l'importance qu'il y a à diffuser la connaissance pour parvenir à un développement durable en récompensant les précurseurs qui s'emploient à révolutionner l'industrie du savoir. » Le conseil d'administration organisera une série de réunions pour définir les conditions de candidature et critères de sélection des lauréats ainsi que pour préparer la cérémonie de remise des prix qui aura lieu lors du Knowledge Summit 2016 (Sommet du savoir 2016) du 5 au 7 décembre, a indiqué Son Excellence bin Huwaireb. Parallèlement, le Dr Al Ghafli a déclaré que le monde arabe avait joué un rôle crucial dans la diffusion du savoir au cours des siècles passés été que cette récompense mettait les Arabes en bonne position pour se réapproprier cette facette admirable de leur histoire. Le professeur Zehnder a salué la récompense, notant au passage qu'elle serait profitable à l'ensemble de l'humanité, soulignant le rôle que joue la connaissance dans notre vie et incitant chacun à participer à la création et la diffusion du savoir. David Bennett a déclaré que ce prix était une initiative importante qui vient récompenser celles et ceux qui diffusent le savoir auprès des peuples du monde entier. Le professeur Rawlins a pour sa part souligné que l'université d'Oxford possède une vaste expérience en matière d'évaluation des contributions apportées au domaine du savoir et jouera, de fait, un rôle actif au sein du conseil d'administration. Le prix vise à contribuer au développement durable des EAU et du monde. Le montant de la récompense s'élève à la coquette somme d'un million de dollars. Fin 2015, Son Altesse le Cheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum a promulgué le décret n° 36/2015 portant création du Knowledge Award. Son Altesse a également adopté le décret n° 17/2016 portant création du conseil d'administration et nomination de ses membres pour un mandat de trois ans renouvelable. Le conseil est présidé par Son Altesse le Cheikh Ahmed bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum et co-présidé par Son Excellence Jamal bin Huwaireb. Au nombre de ses membres figurent des représentants de l'université des Émirats arabes unis, de l'université du Caire, de la Nanyang Technological University à Singapour, de l'université d'Oxford et de National Geographic.


News Article | August 25, 2016
Site: phys.org

From left are Prof. Cheol-Min Park (School of Natural Science) and his student, Subin Choi. Credit: UNIST A new research, affiliated with UNIST has been highlighted on the inside front cover of the June issue of the prestigious journal Chemical Communications. The key finding of this study is the development of new synthetic methods that facilitate the design and synthesis of bioactive compounds and chemical tools for pharmacological studies, the team reports. The study was jointly conducted by Prof. Cheol-Min Park of Department of Chemistry at UNIST, Prof. Nicole S. Y. Loy of School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Nanyang Technological University, and two other researchers. In the study, Prof. Park's team addresses the importance of developing a new simple synthetic method for chemical compounds, as it plays a significant role in drug discovery. According to the team, "The primary goal of this research, in particular, is to improve the scientific basis for drug discovery by better understanding the biochemical mechanisms for diseases" In the study, the formation of an alkyl oxonium ion, which has long been proposed as a key reaction intermediate in alcohol dehydration, is studied by time-resolved fluorescence quenching of a strong photoacid. Their results revealed, for the first time, that the collaboration of two alcohol molecules through hydrogen bonding is critical to enhancing their reactivity and promotes the resulting alcohol cluster to form an effective Brønsted base when reacting with an acid as strong as sulfuric acid. Prof. Park states, "The findings of this research has allowed us to develop the highly efficient synthesis of pyrroles and oxazoles." The synthesis of pyrroles and oxazoles are also known as bioactive components, the team reports. In fact, pyrroles have been used to treat a number of medical conditions, as they possess a broad spectrum of biological activities, such as antidepressant, anticarciogenic, and psychoanalytic. Oxazoles also show the following biological activities, such as anti-influenza virus and cytostatic activities. Explore further: New type of nanowires, built with natural gas heating More information: Nicole S. Y. Loy et al, The synthesis of pyrroles and oxazoles based on gold α-imino carbene complexes, Chem. Commun. (2016). DOI: 10.1039/C6CC01742H


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Men who adhere to masculine norms also less likely to seek treatment, study says WASHINGTON - Men who see themselves as playboys or as having power over women are more likely to have psychological problems than men who conform less to traditionally masculine norms, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. "In general, individuals who conformed strongly to masculine norms tended to have poorer mental health and less favorable attitudes toward seeking psychological help, although the results differed depending on specific types of masculine norms," said lead author Y. Joel Wong, PhD, of Indiana University Bloomington. The study was published in the Journal of Counseling Psychology. Wong and his colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 78 research samples involving 19,453 participants that focused on the relationship between mental health and conformity to 11 norms generally considered by experts to reflect society's expectations of traditional masculinity: Specifically, they focused on three broad types of mental health outcomes: negative mental health (e.g., depression), positive mental health (e.g., life satisfaction), and psychological help seeking (e.g., seeking counseling services). While most of the U.S.-based studies focused on predominantly white males, some focused predominantly on African-Americans and some on Asian-Americans. While overall, conforming to masculine norms was associated with negative mental health outcomes in subjects, the researchers found the association to be most consistent for these three norms - self-reliance, pursuit of playboy behavior, and power over women. "The masculine norms of playboy and power over women are the norms most closely associated with sexist attitudes," said Wong. "The robust association between conformity to these two norms and negative mental health-related outcomes underscores the idea that sexism is not merely a social injustice, but may also have a detrimental effect on the mental health of those who embrace such attitudes." Even more concerning, said Wong, was that men who strongly conformed to masculine norms were not only more likely to have poor mental health but also also less likely to seek mental health treatment. There was one dimension for which the researchers were unable to find any significant effects. "Primacy of work was not significantly associated with any of the mental health-related outcomes," said Wong. "Perhaps this is a reflection of the complexity of work and its implications for well-being. An excessive focus on work can be harmful to one's health and interpersonal relationships, but work is also a source of meaning for many individuals." Also, conformity to the masculine norm of risk-taking was significantly associated with both negative and positive mental health outcomes, suggesting that risk-taking can have both positive and negative psychological consequences, said Wong. Article: "Meta-Analyses of the Relationship Between Conformity to Masculine Norms and Mental Health-Related Outcomes," by Y. Joel Wong, PhD, Shu-Yi Wang, MS, and S. Keino Miller, MA, Indiana University Bloomington, and Moon-Ho Ringo Ho, PhD, Nanyang Technological University. Journal of Counseling Psychology, published online Nov. 21, 2016. Full text of the article is available from the APA Public Affairs Office and at Contact: Joel Wong can be contacted by email at joelwong@indiana.edu or by phone at (812) 856-8293. The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA's membership includes more than 117,500 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives. If you do not want to receive APA news releases, please let us know at public.affairs@apa.org or 202-336-5700.


Hao X.,Tongji University | Hao X.,Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology | Zhai J.,Tongji University | Kong L.B.,Nanyang Technological University | Xu Z.,City University of Hong Kong
Progress in Materials Science | Year: 2014

Lead zirconate (PbZrO3 or PZ)-based antiferroelectric (AFE) materials, as a group of important electronic materials, have attracted increasing attention for their potential applications in high energy storage capacitors, micro-actuators, pyroelectric security sensors, cooling devices, and pulsed power generators and so on, because of their novel external electric field-induced phase switching behavior between AFE state and ferroelectric (FE) state. The performances of AFE materials are strongly dependent on the phase transformation process, which are mainly determined by the constitutions and the external field. For AFE thin/thick films, the electrical properties are also strongly dependent on their thickness, crystal orientation and the characteristics of electrode materials. Accordingly, various strategies have been employed to tailor the phase transformation behavior of AFE materials in order to improve their performances. Due to their relatively poor electrical strength (low breakdown fields), most PZ-based orthorhombic AFE ceramics are broken down before a critical switching field can be applied. As a consequence, the electric-field-induced transition between AFE and FE phase of only those AFE bulk ceramics, with compositions within tetragonal region near the AFE/FE morphotropic phase boundary (MPB), can be realized experimentally at room temperature. AFE materials with such compositions include (Pb,A)ZrO3 (A = Ba, Sr), (Pb1-3/2xLa x)(Zr1-yTiy)O 3 (PLZT x/(1-y)/y), (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr,Sn,Ti) O3 (PLZST) and Pb0.99(Zr,Sn,Ti)0.98Nb 0.02O3 (PNZST). As compared to bulk ceramics, AFE thin and thick films always display better electric-field endurance ability. Consequently, room temperature electric-field-induced AFE-FE phase transition could be observed in the AFE thin/thick films with orthorhombic structures. Moreover, AFE films are more easily integrated with silicon technologies. Therefore, AFE thin/thick films have been a subject of numerous researches. This review serves to summarize the recent progress of PZ-based AFE materials, focusing on the external field (electric field, hydrostatic pressure and temperature) dependences of the AFE-FE phase transition, with a specific attention to the performances of AFE films for various potential applications, such as high energy storage, electric field induced strains, pyroelectric effect and electrocaloric effect. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Das S.,Jadavpur University | Suganthan P.N.,Nanyang Technological University
IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation | Year: 2011

Differential evolution (DE) is arguably one of the most powerful stochastic real-parameter optimization algorithms in current use. DE operates through similar computational steps as employed by a standard evolutionary algorithm (EA). However, unlike traditional EAs, the DE-variants perturb the current-generation population members with the scaled differences of randomly selected and distinct population members. Therefore, no separate probability distribution has to be used for generating the offspring. Since its inception in 1995, DE has drawn the attention of many researchers all over the world resulting in a lot of variants of the basic algorithm with improved performance. This paper presents a detailed review of the basic concepts of DE and a survey of its major variants, its application to multiobjective, constrained, large scale, and uncertain optimization problems, and the theoretical studies conducted on DE so far. Also, it provides an overview of the significant engineering applications that have benefited from the powerful nature of DE. © 2010 IEEE.


Yuan J.,Nanyang Technological University | Liu Z.,Microsoft | Wu Y.,Northwestern University
IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence | Year: 2011

Actions are spatiotemporal patterns. Similar to the sliding window-based object detection, action detection finds the reoccurrences of such spatiotemporal patterns through pattern matching, by handling cluttered and dynamic backgrounds and other types of action variations. We address two critical issues in pattern matching-based action detection: 1) the intrapattern variations in actions, and 2) the computational efficiency in performing action pattern search in cluttered scenes. First, we propose a discriminative pattern matching criterion for action classification, called naive Bayes mutual information maximization (NBMIM). Each action is characterized by a collection of spatiotemporal invariant features and we match it with an action class by measuring the mutual information between them. Based on this matching criterion, action detection is to localize a subvolume in the volumetric video space that has the maximum mutual information toward a specific action class. A novel spatiotemporal branch-and-bound (STBB) search algorithm is designed to efficiently find the optimal solution. Our proposed action detection method does not rely on the results of human detection, tracking, or background subtraction. It can handle action variations such as performing speed and style variations as well as scale changes well. It is also insensitive to dynamic and cluttered backgrounds and even to partial occlusions. The cross-data set experiments on action detection, including KTH, CMU action data sets, and another new MSR action data set, demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed multiclass multiple-instance action detection method. © 2011 IEEE.


Straub D.,Georgia State University | Ang S.,Nanyang Technological University
MIS Quarterly: Management Information Systems | Year: 2011

A divorce between IS academicians and those in practice is premature. First, researchers have produced evidence that the topics attacked by scholars are what practice needs and wants to know about. Second, there is no credible evidence that knowledge transfer is not taking place. The first gap relates to the topics or themes that researchers tackle and their alignment with what practitioners deem to be central to their needs. The second alleged gap relates to whether research conducted by academics is made accessible to and is actually used by practitioners. One of the ways scholars have studied topic relevance is through the analysis of different types or classes of journals so it is important that we develop this idea next as a basis for our later reasoning. There is additional recent scientific evidence of the usefulness of topics in the IS academic press.


Zhang J.,Nanyang Technological University | Cohen R.,University of Waterloo
ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology | Year: 2013

In this article, we present a framework of use in electronic marketplaces that allows buying agents to model the trustworthiness of selling agents in an effective way, making use of seller ratings provided by other buying agents known as advisors. The trustworthiness of the advisors is also modeled, using an approach that combines both personal and public knowledge and allows the relative weighting to be adjusted over time. Through a series of experiments that simulate e-marketplaces, including ones where sellers may vary their behavior over time, we are able to demonstrate that our proposed framework delivers effective seller recommendations to buyers, resulting in important buyer profit. We also propose limiting seller bids as a method for promoting seller honesty, thus facilitating successful selection of sellers by buyers, and demonstrate the value of this approach through experimental results. Overall, this research is focused on the technological aspects of electronic commerce and specifically on technology that would be used to manage trust. © 2013 ACM.


Patent
California Institute of Technology, French National Center for Scientific Research and Nanyang Technological University | Date: 2015-11-10

Provided are methods, systems and devices for thermodynamically evaluating electrochemical systems and components thereof, including electrochemical cells such as batteries. The present systems and methods are capable of monitoring selected electrochemical cell conditions, such as temperature, open circuit voltage and/or composition, and carrying out measurements of a number of cell parameters, including open circuit voltage, time and temperature, with accuracies large enough to allow for precise determination of thermodynamic state functions and materials properties relating to the composition, phase, states of charge, health and safety and electrochemical properties of electrodes and electrolytes in an electrochemical cell. Thermodynamic measurement systems of the present invention are highly versatile and provide information for predicting a wide range of performance attributes for virtually any electrochemical system having an electrode pair.


News Article | April 1, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Scientists implanted electrodes into the muscles of beetles to turn them into "cyborg" insects. More By implanting electrodes into the muscles of beetles, scientists can now precisely control how cyborg insects walk — an ability that may help these bugs carry out complicated tasks, researchers said in a new study. For decades, scientists have looked to insects for inspiration when designing robots, with the hope of learning from millions of years of evolution. After all, insects may be the most successful animals on Earth, making up about 75 percent of all animal species known to humanity. In the past two decades, instead of attempting to create intricate robots that mimic the complexity of the insect form, researchers have tried hijacking bugs to turn them into robots themselves. Scientists can already control the flight of live moths using implanted electronics. Such cyborg insects could find a wide variety of uses, from espionage to search-and-rescue missions. [Video: It Walks! Scientists Turn Beetle Into 'Cyborg'] Although the researchers acknowledged that cyborg insects do have a number of drawbacks compared to true robots, such as limited life spans, they have several advantages, too. For example, insects are ready-made platforms, so inventors wouldn't have to devise and integrate countless tiny parts. Cyborg insects also consume about 100 times less power than robots of comparable size and do not "need complicated code to overcome obstructions" as robots do, study co-author Hirotaka Sato, a mechanical engineer at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, told Live Science. "We can just shut off our controls and let the insect overcome the obstructions by itself." Previous research used electrical signals to spur cyborg insects to walk via electrodes wired to their antennas or brains. However, such connections could often prove unreliable, and scientists had no control over the speed or gait of the insects, the researchers said. Instead of wiring the insects' antennas or brains, Sato and his colleagueswired the insects' muscles to control the way they walked — a strategy the researchers say can improve the agility of cyborg insects toward practical applications. [Robots on the Run! 5 Bots That Can Really Move] Scientists experimented with Mecynorrhina torquata, a giant beetle native to central Africa that can grow to be up to 3.3 inches (8.5 centimeters) long. The researchers experimented with live male beetles purchased from a beetle company in Taiwan. (The males are the larger sex of the species.) The scientists implanted eight pairs of electrodes in each beetle. These electrodes controlled eight muscles in the front legs of each beetle. Electrically stimulating the muscles could make the legs extend or retract, and lower or lift, the researchers said. The scientists analyzed the natural 3D motions of the beetle legs to understand what sequences of motions normally occurred when the insects walked. Next, they developed sequences of electrical stimulation designed to precisely alter the beetles' step frequency, which, in turn, adjusted their step length and walking speed. A future goal of this research is to control all six legs of insects, Sato said. The scientists also want to introduce systems to help monitor the positions of the cyborg insects and steer their paths toward specific targets, he added. The scientists detailed their findings online March 30 in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. Copyright 2016 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


News Article | March 30, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Resistance may soon be futile. With machine implants worthy of a Star Trek villain, a new breed of beetle takes walking instructions from its human overlords. Hirotaka Sato and his colleagues at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore inserted electrodes into flower beetles (Mecynorrhina torquata) to stimulate specific leg muscle groups. By altering the order of electrical zap sequences, the team was able to control a beetle’s gait. Changing the duration of the electrical signals also altered the insects’ speed and step length, Sato and colleagues report March 30 in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. Scientists have already made cyborg insects that can fly, scuttle, and crawl, but controlling things like speed could allow biobots to do more complex tasks. Cyborg beetles and other insects provide a more energy efficient and easier-to-assemble alternative to plain old robots and double as a means to study insect locomotion, the researchers argue.


News Article | November 6, 2016
Site: cen.acs.org

With a new nanoparticle-based thermosensor, researchers have revealed minute variation in temperature along the muscle fibers of a beetle as it prepares for flight (ACS Sens. 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acssensors.6b00320). The work is one of the first to trace the internal temperature of a live animal on the scale of micrometers. Tracking temperature at the microscale in cells and live organisms could help researchers answer fundamental questions in physiology and developmental biology, and even design more precise cancer therapeutics. In one approach toward this goal, scientists use temperature-sensitive fluorescent probes that can be visualized under a microscope. But there are challenges in applying this method in live samples. For one thing, naturally present biomolecules, such as certain coenzymes and other proteins, can generate their own fluorescence and create background noise. Additionally, when cells or organisms move under a fluorescence microscope, the focus changes, generating more noise. To circumvent these problems, Madoka Suzuki of Waseda University and his colleagues, including Hirotaka Sato of Nanyang Technological University, decided to make a probe containing two different fluorescent dyes—a highly temperature-sensitive dye called EuDT, and a less temperature-sensitive one, rhodamine 800, used as a reference. The intensity of EuDT’s glow varies with temperature between 21.5 and 44 °C, whereas the signal from rhodamine 800 doesn’t change much over that range. The system takes out the noise in two ways. The dyes emit reddish light at different wavelengths, avoiding overlap with the blue and green autofluorescence generated by cells. Then, determining temperature by looking at the ratio of the two signals eliminates noise due to movement of the sample. To create the probe, the researchers encapsulated the two dyes in polymeric nanoparticles and verified that the ratio of their emissions showed a strong relationship with temperature. The team then tested the particles in a live animal. Previously, they and other researchers had measured temperature in nematodes and fruit fly larvae on the microscale, but these studies monitored externally induced temperature changes, like those created by shining a laser on the creatures. To see if they could monitor natural heat production by the muscles of relatively larger animals, Suzuki and his colleagues chose to study the 4-cm-long beetle Dicronorrhina derbyana. To try and detect a heat response in the beetle, the researchers tethered it to a stick and removed the cuticle above its shoulder muscle. They spread the nanoparticle sensor over the muscle surface, then pinched one of the beetle’s hind legs with a tweezer to generate a preflight muscle response, and measured the fluorescence. Their results show temperature variation at a much higher spatial resolution than could be detected with an infrared camera. With the nanoparticles, Suzuki says they could see that the temperature seemed to vary along a single muscle fiber. The researchers monitored the fluorescence of 68 μm by 68 μm areas in this study, but Suzuki says the technique could also work at a spatial resolution down to about 200 nm, which would allow researchers to locate heat sources inside cells, such as mitochondria and other organelles. The technique could also be applied to other animals such as mice, he says. Peter Maurer, a physicist developing nanoscale imaging techniques at Stanford University, says it is “an exceptional task” to probe temperature in a living organism on a micrometer scale, and this study takes a step in that direction. The method “can readily be implemented and is relatively robust to many leading sources of systematic errors, making it an ideal technique for many biological applications,” he says. This article has been translated into Spanish by Divulgame.org and can be found here.


News Article | August 25, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: Title Flexible Micro-supercapacitors based on graphene Abstract Micro-supercapacitors with unique two-dimensional (2D) structures are gaining attention due to their small size, high energy density and potential applications in on-chip and portable electronics. Compared to the sandwich structure of conventional supercapacitors, the 2D structure of micro-supercapacitors enables a reduction in the ionic diffusing pathway, and more efficient utilization of the surface area of electrode materials. Meanwhile, emerging wearable electronics require the property of stretchability in addition to flexibility for application on the soft and curved human body that is covered with highly extensible skins. Micro-supercapacitors, as a candidate for essential integrated energy conversion and storage units on wearable electronics, ought to be capable of accommodating large strain while retaining their performance. In this talk, I will present our recent development of highly stretchable micro-supercapacitors with stable electrochemical performance. The excellent stretchable and electrochemical performance relies on the out-of-plane wavy structures of graphene micro-ribbons. It decreases the stain concentration on the electrode fingers, so that the detaching and cracking of the electrode materials could be prevented. In addition, it ensured the electrode fingers keeping relative constant distance, so the stability of the micro-supercapacitors could be enhanced. A future of soft robots that wash your dishes or smart T-shirts that power your cell phone may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid -- not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene. The researchers will present their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world's largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday. It features more than 9,000 presentations on a wide range of science topics. "Most power sources, such as phone batteries, are not stretchable. They are very rigid," says Xiaodong Chen, Ph.D. "My team has made stretchable electrodes, and we have integrated them into a supercapacitor, which is an energy storage device that powers electronic gadgets." Supercapacitors, developed in the 1950s, have a higher power density and longer life cycle than standard capacitors or batteries. And as devices have shrunk, so too have supercapacitors, bringing into the fore a generation of two-dimensional micro-supercapacitors that are integrated into cell phones, computers and other devices. However, these supercapacitors have remained rigid, and are thus a poor fit for soft materials that need to have the ability to elongate. In this study, Chen of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, and his team sought to develop a micro-supercapacitor from graphene. This carbon sheet is renowned for its thinness, strength and conductivity. "Graphene can be flexible and foldable, but it cannot be stretched," he says. To fix that, Chen's team took a cue from skin. Skin has a wave-like microstructure, Chen says. "We started to think of how we could make graphene more like a wave." The researchers' first step was to make graphene micro-ribbons. Most graphene is produced with physical methods -- like shaving the tip of a pencil -- but Chen uses chemistry to build his material. "We have more control over the graphene's structure and thickness that way," he explains. "It's very difficult to control that with the physical approach. Thickness can really affect the conductivity of the electrodes and how much energy the supercapacitor overall can hold." The next step was to create the stretchable polymer chip with a series of pyramidal ridges. The researchers placed the graphene ribbons across the ridges, creating the wave-like structure. The design allowed the material to stretch without the graphene electrodes of the superconductor detaching, cracking or deforming. In addition, the team developed kirigami structures, which are variations of origami folds, to make the supercapacitors 500 percent more flexible without decaying their electrochemical performance. As a final test, Chen has powered an LCD from a calculator with the stretchy graphene-based micro-supercapacitor. Similarly, such stretchy supercapacitors can be used in pressure or chemical sensors. In future experiments, the researchers hope to increase the electrode's surface area so it can hold even more energy. The current version only stores enough energy to power LCD devices for a minute, he says. ### Chen acknowledges funding from the National Research Foundation, Prime Minister's Office, Singapore, under its Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise (CREATE) Programme of Nanomaterials for Energy and Water Management. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | September 13, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Researchers in Singapore have developed a new protein that can alter DNA in living cells with much higher precision than current methods. The ability to alter DNA accurately will open more doors in the development of personalized medicine that could help to tackle human diseases that currently have few treatment options. Examples of diseases that have unmet therapeutic needs include neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington's disease, muscular dystrophies and blood disorders like sickle cell anaemia. This new protein, named iCas, can be easily controlled by an external chemical input and thus solves some of the problems with CRISPR-Cas, the existing gold-standard for DNA altering. For example, existing Cas enzymes may sometimes alter places in the DNA that result in dire consequences. With iCas, users now have the ability to control enzyme activity and thus minimize unintended DNA modifications in the cell. Developed by a collaboration between A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), iCas was published in the peer reviewed scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology this week. Leading the joint research team is Tan Meng How, senior research scientist of stem cell & regenerative  biology at the GIS, and assistant professor at NTU's School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering. "DNA is like an instruction manual that tells living cells how to behave, so if we can rewrite the instructions in this manual, we will be able to gain control over what the cells are supposed to do," explained Tan. "Our engineered iCas protein is like a light switch that can be readily turned on and off as desired. It also outperforms other existing methods in terms of response time and reliability." To ensure that DNA is precisely altered, which is required in many biomedical and biotechnological applications, the activity of the Cas protein must be tightly regulated. The chemical that switches the iCas protein on or off is tamoxifen, a drug commonly used to treat and prevent breast cancer. In its absence, iCas is switched off with no changes made to the DNA. When switched on with tamoxifen, iCas will then edit the target DNA site. In the study, iCas was found to outperform other chemical-inducible CRISPR-Cas technologies, with a much faster response time and an ability to be switched on and off repeatedly. The higher speed at which iCas reacts will enable tighter control over exactly where and when DNA editing takes place. This is useful in research or applications that demand precise control of DNA editing. For example, in studies of cell signaling pathways or vertebrate development, iCas can precisely target a subset of cells within a tissue (spatial control) or to edit the DNA at a particular developmental stage (temporal control). "The iCas technology developed by Dr Tan is an exciting addition to the growing CRISPR toolbox. It enables genome editing in a precisely controlled manner, thus opening new doors for applications of the CRISPR technology in basic and applied biological research," said Huimin Zhao, the Steven L. Miller Chair Professor of the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). "This development allows the researchers to have precision control for more accurate DNA editing, and it can help researchers engineer cells with new properties or repair diseased cells with mutated DNA," added Ng Huck Hui, GIS executive director. "DNA editing is an exciting field with many potential uses in the treatment of diseases. NTU has been active in research in the area of gene sequencing and bioengineering over the past years and this work by Dr Tan and his Singapore team will add to the growing body of knowledge in cell engineering for medicine," said Teoh Swee Hin, chair of NTU's School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering.


News Article | September 13, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Researchers in Singapore have developed a new protein that can alter DNA in living cells with much higher precision than current methods. The ability to alter DNA accurately will open more doors in the development of personalised medicine that could help to tackle human diseases that currently have few treatment options. Examples of diseases that have unmet therapeutic needs include neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington's disease, muscular dystrophies, and blood disorders like sickle cell anaemia. This new protein, named iCas, can be easily controlled by an external chemical input and thus solves some of the problems with CRISPR-Cas*, the existing gold-standard for DNA altering. For example, existing Cas enzymes may sometimes alter places in the DNA that result in dire consequences. With iCas, users now have the ability to control enzyme activity and thus minimize unintended DNA modifications in the cell. Developed by a collaboration between A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), iCas was published in the peer reviewed scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology this week. Leading the joint research team is Dr Tan Meng How, Senior Research Scientist of Stem Cell & Regenerative Biology at the GIS, and Assistant Professor at NTU's School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering. "DNA is like an instruction manual that tells living cells how to behave, so if we can rewrite the instructions in this manual, we will be able to gain control over what the cells are supposed to do," explained Dr Tan. "Our engineered iCas protein is like a light switch that can be readily turned on and off as desired. It also outperforms other existing methods in terms of response time and reliability." To ensure that DNA is precisely altered, which is required in many biomedical and biotechnological applications, the activity of the Cas protein must be tightly regulated. The chemical that switches the iCas protein on or off is tamoxifen, a drug commonly used to treat and prevent breast cancer. In its absence, iCas is switched off with no changes made to the DNA. When switched on with tamoxifen, iCas will then edit the target DNA site. In the study, iCas was found to outperform other chemical-inducible CRISPR-Cas technologies, with a much faster response time and an ability to be switched on and off repeatedly. The higher speed at which iCas reacts will enable tighter control over exactly where and when DNA editing takes place. This is useful in research or applications that demand precise control of DNA editing. For example, in studies of cell signalling pathways or vertebrate development, iCas can precisely target a subset of cells within a tissue (spatial control) or to edit the DNA at a particular developmental stage (temporal control). "The iCas technology developed by Dr Tan is an exciting addition to the growing CRISPR toolbox. It enables genome editing in a precisely controlled manner, thus opening new doors for applications of the CRISPR technology in basic and applied biological research," said Dr Huimin Zhao, the Steven L. Miller Chair Professor of the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). GIS Executive Director Prof Ng Huck Hui added, "This development allows the researchers to have precision control for more accurate DNA editing, and it can help researchers engineer cells with new properties or repair diseased cells with mutated DNA." Prof Teoh Swee Hin, Chair of NTU's School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, said, "DNA editing is an exciting field with many potential uses in the treatment of diseases. NTU has been active in research in the area of gene sequencing and bioengineering over the past years and this work by Dr Tan and his Singapore team will add to the growing body of knowledge in cell engineering for medicine."


News Article | September 13, 2016
Site: phys.org

The ability to alter DNA accurately will open more doors in the development of personalised medicine that could help to tackle human diseases that currently have few treatment options. Examples of diseases that have unmet therapeutic needs include neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington's disease, muscular dystrophies, and blood disorders like sickle cell anaemia. This new protein, named iCas, can be easily controlled by an external chemical input and thus solves some of the problems with CRISPR-Cas, the existing gold-standard for DNA altering. For example, existing Cas enzymes may sometimes alter places in the DNA that result in dire consequences. With iCas, users now have the ability to control enzyme activity and thus minimize unintended DNA modifications in the cell. Developed by a collaboration between A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), iCas was published in the peer reviewed scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology this week. Leading the joint research team is Dr Tan Meng How, Senior Research Scientist of Stem Cell & Regenerative Biology at the GIS, and Assistant Professor at NTU's School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering. "DNA is like an instruction manual that tells living cells how to behave, so if we can rewrite the instructions in this manual, we will be able to gain control over what the cells are supposed to do," explained Dr Tan. "Our engineered iCas protein is like a light switch that can be readily turned on and off as desired. It also outperforms other existing methods in terms of response time and reliability." To ensure that DNA is precisely altered, which is required in many biomedical and biotechnological applications, the activity of the Cas protein must be tightly regulated. The chemical that switches the iCas protein on or off is tamoxifen, a drug commonly used to treat and prevent breast cancer. In its absence, iCas is switched off with no changes made to the DNA. When switched on with tamoxifen, iCas will then edit the target DNA site. In the study, iCas was found to outperform other chemical-inducible CRISPR-Cas technologies, with a much faster response time and an ability to be switched on and off repeatedly. The higher speed at which iCas reacts will enable tighter control over exactly where and when DNA editing takes place. This is useful in research or applications that demand precise control of DNA editing. For example, in studies of cell signalling pathways or vertebrate development, iCas can precisely target a subset of cells within a tissue (spatial control) or to edit the DNA at a particular developmental stage (temporal control). "The iCas technology developed by Dr Tan is an exciting addition to the growing CRISPR toolbox. It enables genome editing in a precisely controlled manner, thus opening new doors for applications of the CRISPR technology in basic and applied biological research," said Dr Huimin Zhao, the Steven L. Miller Chair Professor of the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). GIS Executive Director Prof Ng Huck Hui added, "This development allows the researchers to have precision control for more accurate DNA editing, and it can help researchers engineer cells with new properties or repair diseased cells with mutated DNA." Prof Teoh Swee Hin, Chair of NTU's School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, said, "DNA editing is an exciting field with many potential uses in the treatment of diseases. NTU has been active in research in the area of gene sequencing and bioengineering over the past years and this work by Dr Tan and his Singapore team will add to the growing body of knowledge in cell engineering for medicine." More information: Kaiwen Ivy Liu et al. A chemical-inducible CRISPR–Cas9 system for rapid control of genome editing, Nature Chemical Biology (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nchembio.2179


Wang Z.,Nanyang Technological University | Liu W.,Wuhan University | Xiao W.,Wuhan University | Lou X.W.,Nanyang Technological University
Energy and Environmental Science | Year: 2013

Amorphous CoSnO3@C nanoboxes have been synthesized by thermal annealing of CoSn(OH)6 nanoboxes, followed by carbon nanocoating. Benifiting from the unique structure, they exhibit exceptional long-term cycling stability over 400 cycles for highly reversible lithium storage. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.


Oggier F.,Nanyang Technological University | Hassibi B.,California Institute of Technology
IEEE Transactions on Information Theory | Year: 2011

We consider the MIMO wiretap channel, that is a MIMO broadcast channel where the transmitter sends some confidential information to one user which is a legitimate receiver, while the other user is an eavesdropper. Perfect secrecy is achieved when the transmitter and the legitimate receiver can communicate at some positive rate, while insuring that the eavesdropper gets zero bits of information. In this paper, we compute the perfect secrecy capacity of the multiple antenna MIMO broadcast channel, where the number of antennas is arbitrary for both the transmitter and the two receivers. Our technique involves a careful study of a Sato-like upper bound via the solution of a certain algebraic Riccati equation. © 2011 IEEE.

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