Nantucket, MA, United States
Nantucket, MA, United States

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Omand K.A.,Nantucket Conservation Foundation | Karberg J.M.,Nantucket Conservation Foundation | Beattie K.C.,Nantucket Conservation Foundation | O'Dell D.I.,Nantucket Conservation Foundation | Freeman R.S.,Laurentide Environmental LLC
Natural Areas Journal | Year: 2014

Globally rare sandplain grassland and coastal heathland plant communities of Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, merit high conservation priority because they support many rare and endangered species. Management (brush-cutting, grazing, and prescribed fire) has been effective in maintaining these communities, but less successful in transforming overgrown native scrub oak shrubland to diverse grassland. These scrub oak (Quercus ilicifolia Wangenh.) communities may lack a seed bank of grassland species in their soil. To examine this on Nantucket, we used the seedling emergence method to compare the soil seed bank of grassland, heathland, and scrub oak sites. We classified seedlings by growth form (graminoid, forb, or woody) and identified them to genus and species when possible. We observed that seedling density declined along a successional gradient, with the highest total density and highest graminoid density at grassland sites and the lowest at one of the scrub oak sites. A nMDS ordination grouped grassland sites with dominant graminoids and heathland sites with dominant woody species and forbs. Seeds of key grassland dominants were absent from scrub oak and heathland samples but were found in grassland samples. Our results suggest that lack of seed bank of desirable grassland species may be a limiting factor in restoration projects intended to convert scrub oak shrubland to sandplain grassland. Scarcity of grassland species in the scrub oak seed bank highlights the importance of maintaining existing grassland communities, rather than attempting to restore them once they are gone.


Karberg J.M.,Nantucket Conservation Foundation | Gale M.R.,Michigan Technological University
Conservation Genetics | Year: 2010

The carnivorous wetland plant, Sarracenia purpurea (the northern pitcher plant) is native to eastern and Midwestern North America. This species is abundant within its habitat but suitable habitat is increasingly scarce, raising interest in S. purpurea restoration and conservation. Complicating conservation planning, two controversial subspecies of S. purpurea are historically defined primarily on morphologic traits: S. purpurea subsp. purpurea distributed north of Maryland and S. purpurea subsp. venosa distributed south of Maryland. S. purpurea is also found in three distinct habitat types defined by substrate: acidic Sphagnum peatlands, acidic sandy savannahs, and alkaline marl wetlands. In species level studies, S. purpurea leaves have exhibited morphological plasticity in response to environmental variability, bringing into question the validity of subspecies definitions based on morphology alone. This study examined morphologic and genetic variation throughout S. purpurea's natural distribution, encompassing both the traditional subspecies and three unique habitat types testing the validity of traditional subspecies definitions. Genetic analysis indicated possible ecological significance of considering a new grouping of S. purpurea populations into Midwest, N. East Coast and S. East Coast populations (AMOVA % variation = 13.34, P = 0.0078) based on genetic differentiation. Morphological variation in leaf shape measurements supported this division as well as indicating plasticity associated with environmental variables. This study conservatively suggests that new, geographical area conservation units may be a more important conservation unit for preserving S. purpurea genetic variation and morphological plasticity than traditional subspecies definitions. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Trademark
Nantucket Conservation Foundation | Date: 2012-10-17

Dried fruit, namely, cranberries. Fresh fruit, namely, cranberries.


Trademark
Nantucket Conservation Foundation | Date: 2012-10-17

Dried fruit, namely, cranberries. Fresh fruit, namely, cranberries. Promoting public awareness of the need for the protection and preservation of the environment and ecosystems; association services, namely, promoting the interests of conservationists and the environment; promoting public awareness of environmental issues and initiatives. Charitable fundraising services related to the protection and preservation of the environment and ecosystems. Educational services, namely, providing educational seminars in the field of conservation of nature, species and the environment; providing training in the field of conservation of nature, species and the environment; organizing community sporting and cultural events in the field of conservation of nature, species and the environment; organizing running and walking races; providing recreational facilities in the nature of hiking trails. Wetland habitat development and preservation services, namely, monitoring, testing and analyzing ecological success in the field of environmentally sensitive habitat conservation and preservation of native plants and wildlife; research in the fields of hydrography, oceanography, environmental impact assessments, and ecology.


Trademark
Nantucket Conservation Foundation | Date: 2012-10-17

Dried fruit, namely, cranberries. Fresh fruit, namely, cranberries. Promoting public awareness of the need for the protection and preservation of the environment and ecosystems; association services, namely, promoting the interests of conservationists and the environment; promoting public awareness of environmental issues and initiatives. Charitable fundraising services related to the protection and preservation of the environment and ecosystems. Educational services, namely, providing educational seminars in the field of conservation of nature, species and the environment; providing training in the field of conservation of nature, species and the environment; organizing community sporting and cultural events in the field of conservation of nature, species and the environment; organizing running and walking races; providing recreational facilities in the nature of hiking trails. Wetland habitat development and preservation services, namely, monitoring, testing and analyzing ecological success in the field of environmentally sensitive habitat conservation and preservation of native plants and wildlife; research in the fields of hydrography, oceanography, environmental impact assessments, and ecology.


Trademark
Nantucket Conservation Foundation | Date: 2012-10-17

Fresh fruit, namely, cranberries.

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