Sutton, MA, United States
Sutton, MA, United States
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Ruiz-Cruz J.A.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Fahmi M.M.,University of Waterloo | Mansour R.R.,University of Waterloo | Mansour R.R.,NanoWave
IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques | Year: 2012

Novel combline resonators and filters with enhanced dual-band characteristics are introduced in this paper. The proposed resonator is made up of three metallic conductors: an inner post, an intermediate conductor, and an enclosure. This structure provides two asynchronous resonant modes that can be used for realizing compact microwave dual-band filters. Such dual-band filters offer the low cost, compact size, and ease of manufacturing features of traditional combline resonator filters, with additional size reduction due to the fact that a single physical cavity provides two electrical resonators. In addition, the new cavity introduces a transmission zero in the guard-bands enhancing the filter selectivity, while keeping a simple and compact inline topology. The design of filters based on this novel resonator is discussed, starting with the resonator circuit model, the coupling scheme, and the complete filter design methodology. Simulations as well as experimental results of a tenth-order (2 × 5) dual-band filter with a measured rejection level in excess of 100 dB in the guard-band are presented to show the concept. © 1963-2012 IEEE.


Patent
NanoWave | Date: 2013-11-25

A digitally compensated phase locked oscillator (DCPLO) is disclosed herein. The DCPLO comprises: a DCPLO input for receiving a reference signal at a known frequency; a DCPLO output for outputting a signal at a desired frequency; a phased locked loop (PLL), the phased locked loop comprising: a phase frequency detector, an oscillator, and a PLL output coupled to the output; a first direct digital synthesizer (DDS), the first DDS having an output coupled to the PLL to supply a DDS signal to the PLL for adjusting the frequency within the PLL so as to maintain phase lock over the operating temperature; a temperature sensor; and a processor coupled to the first DDS, the phase frequency detector, and the temperature sensor, the processor configured to set the frequency of the first DDS according to a temperature sensed by the temperature sensor.


Patent
NanoWave | Date: 2013-04-04

An electronically tunable filter (ETF) and systems comprising an ETF are disclosed herein. The ETF comprises: a first image rejection mixer; a second image rejection mixer; a first hybrid coupler, the first hybrid coupler being coupled to the first image rejection mixer; a second hybrid coupler, the second hybrid coupler being coupled to the second image rejection mixer; an internal filter coupled to the first hybrid coupler and the second hybrid coupler; a control port for receiving a control signal; a power splitter coupled to the control port, the first image rejection mixer, and the second image rejection mixer; a first port coupled to the first image rejection mixer; and a second port coupled to the first image rejection mixer.


Patent
NanoWave | Date: 2014-05-23

Embodiments disclosed herein relate to wave guide couplers as well as 3-way, 6-way, and 9-way combiners. The waveguide coupler comprises: a housing having a first outer waveguide branch, a second outer waveguide branch, and an inner waveguide branch; first, second, and third input ports in communication with the first outer, second outer, and the inner waveguide branches respectively; an output port in communication with the inner waveguide branch; a first wall separating the first outer waveguide branch and the inner waveguide branch, the first wall having a first iris; a second wall separating the second outer waveguide branch and the inner waveguide branch, the second wall having a second iris; a first tapered section in the first outer waveguide branch; and a second tapered section the second outer waveguide branch. Various embodiments of the 3-way, 6-way, and 9-way combiners are implemented using the wave guide coupler.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 135.15K | Year: 2010

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will establish the feasibility of transforming a wide-field optical microscope into a real-time imaging/metrology system. The system will have a spatial resolution better than 10 nanometers, when used as a wide-field optical microscope, and better than 1 Angstrom when used as a position tracker for nanoscale particles. Recent progress reaching effective resolutions below the Rayleigh diffraction limit of ~200 nm has spurred research in the fields of medical imaging and micro metrology. However, these optical microscopes and interferometers rely on a temporal image formed on an image sensor for the intensity and phase map calculation, which makes it difficult to isolate the measurement from vibration and other noise. In order to mitigate this issue, we will develop a system which integrates (1) an active optoelectronic mixing method to provide fast, synchronous phase-amplitude detection within a single frame acquisition time with high signal-to-noise and dynamic range, (2) a picometer-resolution motion scanner for precise active positioning of the pixel and/or structured illumination pattern with real-time super-resolution image reconstruction and (3) a real-time signal processing engine to solve the complicated inverse filter problem, to allow fast processing and better image resolution.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to provide an economical add-on solution to optical microscopes to enhance observation and metrology performance to a level which is comparable to much more expensive electron microscopy or scanning probe systems. The resulting add-on system will allow many researchers and industrial users to significantly enhance their existing optical microscopes performance at a fraction of the cost of conventional high-resolution imaging systems. The proposed system is expected to increase imaging productivity for manufacturing process evaluation and quality inspection in the fields of biomedical science, semiconductor devices, data storage and optical components. The new imaging capability, integrated with a quantitative phase measurement capability, is not only useful for life science (for example, for understanding system behavior at the molecular level in living cells), but also vital for inspecting and measuring surface parameters and nanoscale particle behavior for semiconductor manufacturers, makers of high precision optical components, and others involved in the fabrication and inspection of nanoscale materials and systems.


Patent
NanoWave | Date: 2012-11-29

An offset phase locked loop synthesizer comprising: an input; an output; a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO), the VCO output coupled to the synthesizer output; a phase frequency detector having a reference input, a feed-back input, and an output; a mixer having a first mixer input coupled to the synthesizer input and a second mixer input coupled to the VCO output; a first divider for frequency dividing a signal by a first value and having an input coupled to the mixer output and an output coupled to the second input of the phase frequency detector; a second divider for frequency dividing a signal by a second value and having an input coupled to the synthesizer input and an output coupled to the reference input of the phase frequency detector; and a low pass filter coupled between the output of the phase frequency detector and the VCO input.


Patent
NanoWave | Date: 2012-07-16

An apparatus and method for providing an output signal. The apparatus comprises an input for receiving a reference signal, an oscillator for providing an output signal, and an offset signal generator for frequency multiplying the reference signal to generate an offset signal that has a plurality of frequency products in a plurality of frequency bands. The apparatus further includes a mixer for mixing the offset signal with the output signal to produce a combined signal, an offset frequency selector for controllably selecting a frequency band of the offset signal, and a difference detector for detecting a difference between the reference signal and the combined signal and for providing a control signal to the oscillator based on the detected difference.


Patent
NanoWave | Date: 2013-10-25

Circuits and methods for identifying or verifying frequencies are disclosed herein. A frequency verification circuit comprises: an input port for receiving an input signal; a phase frequency difference detector for determining a difference in phase and frequency between the input signal and a feedback signal and for providing a control signal based on the detected difference; a voltage controlled crystal oscillator for producing an output signal based on the control signal; and a feedback loop including a feedback divider for frequency dividing the output signal by a factor R to produce the feedback signal, the feedback divider being programmable to a plurality of values of the factor R to correspond to a plurality of different test frequencies.


Trademark
NanoWave | Date: 2016-03-07

Wireless communication devices and component parts therefor; RADAR devices and components and parts therefor; microwave circuits, integrated microwave assemblies; amplifiers, multipliers, converters, mixers, electronic filters, power conditioners, limiters, switches; electromagnetic sensors; thin film electronic dies and circuits; transceivers; global positioning systems components; clock sources and electronic oscillators for wireless communication devices; LIDAR devices and component parts therefor; space qualified electronic devices. Electronic sub-component manufacturing services for others.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 135.15K | Year: 2010

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will establish the feasibility of transforming a wide-field optical microscope into a real-time imaging/metrology system. The system will have a spatial resolution better than 10 nanometers, when used as a wide-field optical microscope, and better than 1 Angstrom when used as a position tracker for nanoscale particles. Recent progress reaching effective resolutions below the Rayleigh diffraction limit of ~200 nm has spurred research in the fields of medical imaging and micro metrology. However, these optical microscopes and interferometers rely on a temporal image formed on an image sensor for the intensity and phase map calculation, which makes it difficult to isolate the measurement from vibration and other noise. In order to mitigate this issue, we will develop a system which integrates (1) an active optoelectronic mixing method to provide fast, synchronous phase-amplitude detection within a single frame acquisition time with high signal-to-noise and dynamic range, (2) a picometer-resolution motion scanner for precise active positioning of the pixel and/or structured illumination pattern with real-time super-resolution image reconstruction and (3) a real-time signal processing engine to solve the complicated inverse filter problem, to allow fast processing and better image resolution. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to provide an economical add-on solution to optical microscopes to enhance observation and metrology performance to a level which is comparable to much more expensive electron microscopy or scanning probe systems. The resulting add-on system will allow many researchers and industrial users to significantly enhance their existing optical microscopes' performance at a fraction of the cost of conventional high-resolution imaging systems. The proposed system is expected to increase imaging productivity for manufacturing process evaluation and quality inspection in the fields of biomedical science, semiconductor devices, data storage and optical components. The new imaging capability, integrated with a quantitative phase measurement capability, is not only useful for life science (for example, for understanding system behavior at the molecular level in living cells), but also vital for inspecting and measuring surface parameters and nanoscale particle behavior for semiconductor manufacturers, makers of high precision optical components, and others involved in the fabrication and inspection of nanoscale materials and systems.

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