Nanosystem Ltd.

Moscow, Russia

Nanosystem Ltd.

Moscow, Russia
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Wohlfart S.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Khalansky A.S.,Institute of Human Morphology | Gelperina S.,Nanosystem Ltd. | Maksimenko O.,Nanosystem Ltd. | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Background: Chemotherapy of glioblastoma is largely ineffective as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents entry of most anticancer agents into the brain. For an efficient treatment of glioblastomas it is necessary to deliver anti-cancer drugs across the intact BBB. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles coated with poloxamer 188 hold great promise as drug carriers for brain delivery after their intravenous injection. In the present study the anti-tumour efficacy of the surfactant-coated doxorubicin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles against rat glioblastoma 101/8 was investigated using histological and immunohistochemical methods. Methodology: The particles were prepared by a high-pressure solvent evaporation technique using 1% polyvinylalcohol (PLGA/PVA) or human serum albumin (PLGA/HSA) as stabilizers. Additionally, lecithin-containing PLGA/HSA particles (Dox-Lecithin-PLGA/HSA) were prepared. For evaluation of the antitumour efficacy the glioblastoma-bearing rats were treated intravenously with the doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles coated with poloxamer 188 using the following treatment regimen: 3×2.5 mg/kg on day 2, 5 and 8 after tumour implantation; doxorubicin and poloxamer 188 solutions were used as controls. On day 18, the rats were sacrificed and the antitumour effect was determined by measurement of tumour size, necrotic areas, proliferation index, and expression of GFAP and VEGF as well as Isolectin B4, a marker for the vessel density. Conclusion: The results reveal a considerable anti-tumour effect of the doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles. The overall best results were observed for Dox-Lecithin-PLGA/HSA. These data demonstrate that the poloxamer 188-coated PLGA nanoparticles enable delivery of doxorubicin across the blood-brain barrier in the therapeutically effective concentrations. © 2011 Wohlfart et al.


Watcharin W.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Schmithals C.,University Hospital Frankfurt | Pleli T.,University Hospital Frankfurt | Koberle V.,University Hospital Frankfurt | And 10 more authors.
European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics | Year: 2014

Tumor visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nanoparticle-based contrast agents may improve the imaging of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In particular, human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles appear to be a suitable carrier due to their safety and feasibility of functionalization. In the present study HSA nanoparticles were conjugated with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) using carbodiimide chemistry. The nanoparticles had a uniform spherical shape and a diameter of 235 ± 19 nm. For better optical visualization in vitro and in vivo, the HSA-Gd nanoparticles were additionally labeled with rhodamine 123. As shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, the fluorescent nanoparticles were readily taken up by Huh-7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. After 24 h incubation in blood serum, less than 5% of the Gd(III) was released from the particles, which suggests that this nanoparticulate system may be stable in vivo and, therefore, may serve as potentially safe T1 MRI contrast agent for MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | University Hospital Frankfurt, Goethe University Frankfurt and Nanosystem Ltd
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.V | Year: 2014

Tumor visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nanoparticle-based contrast agents may improve the imaging of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In particular, human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles appear to be a suitable carrier due to their safety and feasibility of functionalization. In the present study HSA nanoparticles were conjugated with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) using carbodiimide chemistry. The nanoparticles had a uniform spherical shape and a diameter of 23519nm. For better optical visualization in vitro and in vivo, the HSA-Gd nanoparticles were additionally labeled with rhodamine 123. As shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, the fluorescent nanoparticles were readily taken up by Huh-7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. After 24h incubation in blood serum, less than 5% of the Gd(III) was released from the particles, which suggests that this nanoparticulate system may be stable in vivo and, therefore, may serve as potentially safe T1 MRI contrast agent for MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma.


Korkusuz H.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Ulbrich K.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Welzel K.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Koeberle V.,Goethe University Frankfurt | And 18 more authors.
Molecular Imaging and Biology | Year: 2013

Purpose: In this study, the contrasting properties of human serum albumin nanoparticles (HSA-NPs) loaded with gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and coated with transferrin in MRI in mice are evaluated. Procedures: HSA-NPs were conjugated with Gd-DTPA (Gd-HSA-NPs) and coupled with transferrin (Gd-HSA-NP-Tf). Mice underwent MRI before or after injection of Gd-DTPA, Gd-HSA-NP, or Gd-HSA-NP-Tf. Results: All the studied contrast agents provided a contrast enhancement (CE) in the blood, heart muscle, and liver. Compared to Gd-DTPA, CE with HSA-NP was achieved at lower Gd doses. Gd-HSA-NP-Tf yielded significantly higher CE than Gd-HSA-NP in the skeletal muscle, blood, cardiac muscle, and liver (p < 0.05). Gd-HSA-NP-Tf achieved a significantly higher CE than Gd-HSA-NP and Gd-DTPA in the blood, cardiac muscle, and liver (p < 0.05). In the brain, only Gd-HSA-NP-Tf was found to cause a significant CE (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The Gd-HSA nanoparticles have potential as MRI contrast agents. In particular, Gd-HSA-NP-Tf has a potential as a specific contrast agent for the brain, while the blood-brain barrier is still intact, as well as in the heart, liver, and skeletal muscle. © 2012 World Molecular Imaging Society.


Watcharin W.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Schmithals C.,University Hospital of Frankfurt | Pleli T.,University Hospital of Frankfurt | Koberle V.,University Hospital of Frankfurt | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Controlled Release | Year: 2015

Nanoparticle (NP)-based contrast agents that enable high resolution anatomic T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the prospect of improving differential diagnosis of liver tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we investigated the possibility of employing novel non-toxic human serum albumin nanoparticles conjugated with Gd-DTPA and rhodamine 123 (Gd-Rho-HSA-NPs) for the detection of HCC by T1-weighted MRI. In addition, the influence of surface coating of the NPs with poloxamine 908, which alters the absorptive behavior of NPs and changes their distribution between the liver and tumor was examined. MRI of transgenic mice with endogenously formed HCCs following intravenous injection of Gd-Rho-HSA-NPs revealed a strong negative contrast of the tumors. Contrasting of the HCCs by NP-enhanced MRI required less Gd as compared to gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-enhanced MRI, which currently provides the most sensitive detection of HCC in patients. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the Gd-Rho-HSA-NPs were localized to macrophages, which were - similar to HCC in patients - fewer in number in HCC as compared to the liver tissue, which is in agreement with the negative contrasting of HCC in Gd-Rho-HSA-NP-enhanced MRI. Poloxamine-coated NPs showed lower accumulation in the tumor macrophages and caused a longer lasting enhancement of the MRI signal. These data indicate that Gd-Rho-HSA-NPs enable sensitive detection of HCC by T1-weighted MRI in mice with endogenous HCC through their uptake by macrophages. Poloxamine coating of the NPs delayed the tumor localization of the NPs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Nanosystem Ltd., University Hospital of Frankfurt and Goethe University Frankfurt
Type: | Journal: Journal of controlled release : official journal of the Controlled Release Society | Year: 2015

Nanoparticle (NP)-based contrast agents that enable high resolution anatomic T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the prospect of improving differential diagnosis of liver tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we investigated the possibility of employing novel non-toxic human serum albumin nanoparticles conjugated with Gd-DTPA and rhodamine 123 (Gd-Rho-HSA-NPs) for the detection of HCC by T1-weighted MRI. In addition, the influence of surface coating of the NPs with poloxamine 908, which alters the absorptive behavior of NPs and changes their distribution between the liver and tumor was examined. MRI of transgenic mice with endogenously formed HCCs following intravenous injection of Gd-Rho-HSA-NPs revealed a strong negative contrast of the tumors. Contrasting of the HCCs by NP-enhanced MRI required less Gd as compared to gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-enhanced MRI, which currently provides the most sensitive detection of HCC in patients. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the Gd-Rho-HSA-NPs were localized to macrophages, which were - similar to HCC in patients - fewer in number in HCC as compared to the liver tissue, which is in agreement with the negative contrasting of HCC in Gd-Rho-HSA-NP-enhanced MRI. Poloxamine-coated NPs showed lower accumulation in the tumor macrophages and caused a longer lasting enhancement of the MRI signal. These data indicate that Gd-Rho-HSA-NPs enable sensitive detection of HCC by T1-weighted MRI in mice with endogenous HCC through their uptake by macrophages. Poloxamine coating of the NPs delayed the tumor localization of the NPs.


Anshakova A.V.,Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology | Yermolenko Yu.V.,Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology | Konyukhov V.Yu.,Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology | Polshakov V.I.,Moscow State University | And 2 more authors.
Russian Journal of Physical Chemistry A | Year: 2015

The possibility of a intermolecular complex rifabutin (RB)-2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) formed as a result of the interaction of the piperidine fragment of the RB molecule and the hydrophobic cavity of the HP-β-CD molecule was found. The stability constant of the intermolecular complex was determined. © 2015 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.


Gelperina S.,Nanosystem Ltd. | Maksimenko O.,Nanosystem Ltd. | Khalansky A.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | Vanchugova L.,Nanosystem Ltd. | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics | Year: 2010

Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles coated with poloxamer 188 (Pluronic® F-68) or polysorbate 80 (Tween® 80) enable an efficient brain delivery of the drugs after intravenous injection. This ability was evidenced by two different pharmacological test systems employing as model drugs the anti-tumour antibiotic doxorubicin and the agonist of opioid receptors loperamide, which being P-gp substrates can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) only in pharmacologically insignificant amounts: binding of doxorubicin to the surfactant-coated PLGA nanoparticles, however, enabled a high anti-tumour effect against an intracranial 101/8 glioblastoma in rats, and the penetration of nanoparticle-bound loperamide into the brain was demonstrated by the induction of central analgesic effects in mice. Both pharmacological tests could demonstrate that therapeutic amounts of the drugs were delivered to the sites of action in the brain and showed the high efficiency of the surfactant-coated PLGA nanoparticles for brain delivery. The results of the study also demonstrated that the efficacy of brain delivery by nanoparticles not only is influenced by the coating surfactants but also by other formulation parameters such as core polymer, drug, and stabilizer. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Muhlstein A.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Gelperina S.,Nanosystem Ltd. | Shipulo E.,Nanosystem Ltd. | Maksimenko O.,Nanosystem Ltd. | Kreuter J.,Goethe University Frankfurt
Pharmazie | Year: 2014

Arylsulfatase A (ASA) deficiency is the cause of metachromatic leucodystrophy (MLD), a lysosomal storage disease associated with severe neurological disorders. Poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) (PBCA) nanoparticles overcoated with polysorbate 80 enabled the delivery of several drugs across the blood-brain barrier to the brain suggesting that these nanoparticles also may transport ASA across this barrier. The objective of this research, therefore, was to evaluate the feasibility of loading ASA onto PBCA nanoparticles. A stablea ASA-loaded PBCA nanoparticle formulation was developed that could be easily freeze-dried and stored over a period of more than 8 weeks. The maximum loading capacity for this enzyme was ∼59 μg per 1mg of PBCA. In the presence of 3% sucrose as a lyoprotector the activity of freeze-dried ASA was found to be 100% recoverable.


Sempf K.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Arrey T.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Gelperina S.,Nanosystem Ltd. | Schorge T.,Goethe University Frankfurt | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics | Year: 2013

The biodistribution of nanoparticles is significantly influenced by their interaction with plasma proteins. In order to optimize and possibly monitor the delivery of drugs bound to nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the protein adsorption pattern of uncoated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles after their incubation in human plasma was studied by mass spectrometry. After washing of the particles with water, the proteins were directly digested on the nanoparticle surface using trypsin and then analyzed by nLC MALDI-TOF/TOF. Up to now, the standard method for investigation into the plasma protein adsorption to the particles was 2D gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), in certain cases followed by mass spectrometry. The non-gel-based method proposed in the present study provides novel insights into the protein corona surrounding the nanoparticles. The proteins adsorbed on the PLGA nanoparticles after incubation that gave the best signal in terms of quality (high MASCOT score) in human plasma were apolipoprotein E, vitronectin, histidine-rich glycoprotein and kininogen-1. These proteins also are constituents of HDL. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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